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What to expect during a pelvic examWWhat to expect during a pelvic examWhat to expect during a pelvic examEnglishAdolescent;DevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)Pelvis;BodyReproductive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00Z9.6000000000000057.4000000000000719.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>To make sure that your reproductive organs are healthy, you should have a pelvic exam every 3 years, starting at age 25, or sooner if you are sexually active or have specific concerns . Find out what you can expect during your first pelvic exam.</p><div class="callout2"><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. After reading this article, please take 5 minutes to complete our Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey.</p> <button> <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">click here</a></button> </div><h2>What is a pelvic exam?</h2><p>A pelvic exam (or internal exam) is a test done by a health-care provider to examine your vulva, vagina and cervix for any abnormalities. Sometimes it also involves taking a sample from the vagina or cervix to test for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or for changes that can lead to cervical cancer.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A pelvic exam is a test done to examine the vulva, vagina and cervix for abnormalities and to test for STIs and changes that can cause cervical cancer.</li><li>A pelvic exam should be done once you turn 25 and then every 3 years after that if you are sexually active; however, you may have a pelvic exam before you turn 25 if you are sexually active or if you have any specific concerns.</li><li>A pelvic exam includes external and internal visual exams to check for any abnormalities. In some cases, you may also need a physical exam to check the size, shape and position of your internal reproductive organs.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

What to expect during a pelvic exam3991.00000000000What to expect during a pelvic examWhat to expect during a pelvic examWEnglishAdolescent;DevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)Pelvis;BodyReproductive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00Z9.6000000000000057.4000000000000719.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>To make sure that your reproductive organs are healthy, you should have a pelvic exam every 3 years, starting at age 25, or sooner if you are sexually active or have specific concerns . Find out what you can expect during your first pelvic exam.</p><div class="callout2"><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. After reading this article, please take 5 minutes to complete our Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey.</p> <button> <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">click here</a></button> </div><h2>What is a pelvic exam?</h2><p>A pelvic exam (or internal exam) is a test done by a health-care provider to examine your vulva, vagina and cervix for any abnormalities. Sometimes it also involves taking a sample from the vagina or cervix to test for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or for changes that can lead to cervical cancer.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A pelvic exam is a test done to examine the vulva, vagina and cervix for abnormalities and to test for STIs and changes that can cause cervical cancer.</li><li>A pelvic exam should be done once you turn 25 and then every 3 years after that if you are sexually active; however, you may have a pelvic exam before you turn 25 if you are sexually active or if you have any specific concerns.</li><li>A pelvic exam includes external and internal visual exams to check for any abnormalities. In some cases, you may also need a physical exam to check the size, shape and position of your internal reproductive organs.</li></ul><h2>Why do I need a pelvic exam?</h2><p>There are several reasons you may need a pelvic exam. Pelvic exams are done to:</p><ul><li>Check that your internal reproductive organs are healthy and inspect your vulva and vagina for any abnormalities</li><li>Test for STIs – this is suggested every year and every new partner</li><li>Take a Pap test to check for early signs of cervical cancer – Paps should start at age 25 and only if you are sexually active</li><li>Diagnose a medical condition if you’re experiencing pelvic pain, or unusual bleeding or discharge</li></ul><p>You should have a pelvic exam once you turn 25, and then every 3 years after that if you are sexually active. You may have a pelvic exam before you turn 25 if you are sexually active or if you have any specific concerns. </p><h2>What happens during a pelvic exam?</h2><p>First, your health-care provider will ask you questions about your health and sexual activity.</p><p>A pelvic exam only takes a few minutes. It’s normal to feel nervous or shy, especially before your first pelvic exam. Remember, if you feel unsafe or uncomfortable, tell your health-care provider to stop. You may also choose to wait to do a pelvic exam at a future visit if you are feeling nervous or uncomfortable.</p><p>You will be asked to undress from the waist down and will be given a sheet to place over your lap for privacy. Then, you will lie down on your back on an exam table, with your knees bent and your feet placed in footrests. You will need to slide your body toward the end of the table and have your knees fall open to the sides.</p><p>This may feel uncomfortable, especially the first time. It’s important to listen to your provider’s instructions on how to position yourself in order to make the exam more comfortable. Don’t be afraid to ask your health-care provider about any questions or concerns you have!</p><h3>External visual exam</h3><p>The health-care provider will look at your vulva and surrounding area to check for redness, irritation, sores and any other abnormalities.</p><h3>Internal visual exam</h3><p>The health-care provider will then gently insert a metal or plastic tool called a speculum into your vagina. This is done to open the vaginal walls so they can see your vagina and cervix. </p><h3>Pap test and STI testing</h3> If your physical exam includes a Pap test (Pap smear), the health-care provider will swab your cervix with a small broom to collect cells. These cells are then tested for signs of cervical cancer. Swabs of the vagina or cervix may also be performed to test for STIs such as gonorrhea and chlamydia. <p></p><h3>Bimanual or physical exam</h3><p>Your health-care provider may need to do a bimanual exam to check the size, shape and position of your internal reproductive organs including the ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus. They will insert two gloved fingers into your vagina and press on the outside of your lower abdomen (belly) with the other hand. They will check for any tenderness or abnormal growths.</p>