AboutKidsHealth for Teens

Welcome to the AboutKidsHealth website just for teens

Learn about your health




 

 

How to become more resilientHow to become more resilientHow to become more resilientHEnglishAdolescent;Psychiatry;PreventionTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000066.5000000000000631.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out what mindfulness is, how it can help you to build resilience and lower your stress levels, and different methods to practise mindfulness everyday.</p><h2>Learn about mindfulness</h2><p>Mindfulness involves paying attention, on purpose, with kindness. Think about it as the opposite of multi-tasking. Instead of switching between lots of things, you’re paying full attention to and being completely aware of what you’re doing from one moment to the next. Mindfulness can be seen as a way of life.<br></p><p>Mindfulness, including both formal and informal meditation, is linked to lower stress levels, more even moods, better memory and concentration and a stronger immune system. </p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QTsUEOUaWpY?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"><strong>Everyday mindfulness</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains what everyday mindfulness is, and how being aware of what is going on around you and inside of you can help make life more enjoyable and less stressful.</p></div><h2>Formal mindfulness</h2><p>This involves choosing something to pay attention to, for example your breath. Then, when you get distracted, you may notice where your attention went and bring it back to your breath (or whatever you had been focusing on before). </p><p>Distractions will happen; everybody gets distracted. The distractions might be thoughts, emotions or physical sensations in your body. </p><p>But noticing when you are distracted can be a good thing. It means you were paying attention! Gently and with kindness, you can then bring your attention back to your breath. </p><p>It is important not to be too hard on yourself. Mindfulness may sound simple but that doesn’t mean it is easy. Being kind to yourself is just as important as practising focusing your attention. </p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xcO8IIeV12M?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title">Mindfulness of </span><span class="vid-title"></span> <span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title">thoughts</span><span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This audio meditation helps you slow down the thoughts in your mind and meditate on them. Use this practice when you are feeling distracted with too many thoughts in your mind. You may stand, sit or lie down to follow along. Try to find a comfortable position that will not require you to move around.</p></div><h2>Informal mindfulness</h2><p>This involves paying total attention to activities you do in your everyday life, like eating or brushing your teeth. </p><p>Consider informal mindfulness an open awareness of the thoughts, feelings, memories or physical sensations that come up while you’re doing everyday things. It is important to do this with kindness and allow yourself to notice whatever surfaces without criticizing yourself.</p><p>Everybody has judgments throughout the day, but try to notice them and be kind to yourself when they are there. Remember, having various thoughts, feelings or sensations doesn’t mean you have to act on them.</p><h2>Take care of yourself</h2><p>Create a list of things that help you feel relaxed and be sure to do them regularly. These can be things like meditating, taking a bath, taking deep breaths, listening to relaxing music or getting a massage. It doesn’t matter what you do as long as it is something that you enjoy and that makes you feel calm.</p><h2>Remember how you have coped in the past</h2><p>When the going gets tough, remember the hurdles you have overcome or accomplishments you have already made. How did you do it? What skills and strategies helped you? Thinking back on how you have succeeded in the past can help you use the same skills in the future.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0QXmmP4psbA?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"><strong>You are not your thoughts</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains some of the things you can try when you feel overwhelmed by your thoughts. After the video, take a few moments to observe your thoughts with curiosity, paying attention to how each one makes you feel. Paying attention to your thoughts and sorting through them takes practice and patience.</p></div><div id="ymhp-animation" class="asset-animation asset-cv-animation"> <iframe src="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/AKH/animations/YMHP-UnhelpfulThoughts/MentalHealth-UnhelpfulThoughts.html"></iframe>  <br></div><h2>Practise daily gratitude</h2><p>When people are feeling stressed out or struggling with physical, emotional or social issues, it can be hard to be thankful.</p><p>But try to pick a time of day and think of three things that you have been thankful or grateful for from the previous 24 hours. Be as detailed and specific as you can. You can pick something seemingly small, like finding money in an old coat pocket, catching the bus just in time or having someone hold a door for you.<br></p><h2>Stay in touch with friends and take time to thank others</h2><p>If you haven’t spoken to someone in a while, contact them. Take the time to think of someone who has been helpful to you every day and let them know. This can be in an email, a text or a chat in person. Staying connected with friends and showing them gratitude can do a lot to support your own resilience.</p><p>Remember that resilience is a way of life. Practising these skills and strategies is something you do every day, not just when you are feeling stressed or having a hard time. When you practise them on neutral or good days, you will find it easier to use them on the hard days.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cFCiUlFKuO4?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"><strong>Two wings to fly</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains the value of balancing mindfulness and compassion. Use it to help you respond to change and other unwanted experiences. Mindfulness helps you find opportunities to understand your situation more clearly. Compassion helps you respond with kindness and less judgment. After you watch the video, think about how you can practise mindfulness and show compassion towards yourself and others.</p></div><p>For more information on mindfulness, check out the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/patient-family-resources/child-family-centred-care/spiritual-care/the-mindfulness-project/index.html">SickKids Mindfulness Project</a> website.<br></p><h3>Kids Help Phone – <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">kidshelpphone.ca</a></h3><p>Kids Help Phone is a 24/7 e-mental health service offering free, confidential support to young people.</p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/12-instant-stress-busters/">12 instant stress busters</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/kids-help-phones-wheel-of-well-being/">Kids Help Phone’s Wheel of Well-Being</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/what-is-mindfulness-and-how-can-i-practise-it/">What is mindfulness, and how can I practise it?</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/how-can-i-cope-with-my-feelings-about-the-future/">How can I cope with my feelings about the future?</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/8-ways-foster-hope-your-daily-life/">8 ways to foster hope in your daily life</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/how_to_become_more_resilient.jpgTeens
Nutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy dietNutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy dietNutrition and mental health: The basics of a healthy dietNEnglishNutrition;Psychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years)BodyNAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00Z9.2000000000000060.5000000000000555.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>For your mood and general wellbeing, eat a balance of macronutrients (complex carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals).</p><h2>Carbohydrates</h2><p>Carbohydrates are your body’s main source of energy and your brain’s only source of energy. This energy keeps you thinking clearly and ready to take on your daily routine.</p><p>To keep your mood and energy levels stable, try to choose complex carbohydrates such as vegetables, legumes (such as chickpeas or lentils), whole grain products, and some fruits, with their skins on if possible. These foods are also an important source of fibre, which helps you feel full for longer and helps food move through your digestive system regularly. </p><p>Candy, juices and other sugary food and drinks are all forms of simple carbohydrates. You can eat them occasionally, but don’t rely on them to give you energy. They can cause your blood sugar to “spike” and then suddenly drop off, leading to energy slumps during the day. </p><h2>Protein</h2><p>As a building block for your body, protein helps to build and repair your muscles, organs and bones and helps to maintain a healthy immune system to keep you feeling well. Protein is made up of amino acids that your body needs to function as well as possible. Overall, protein also helps you feel full for longer, which in turn helps you function better. </p><p>You can get protein from chicken, beef, fish and other meats as well as from eggs, milk, cheese and yogurt. Plant-based sources of protein include beans, lentils, nuts, seeds, tofu and tempeh. </p><h2>Fats</h2><p>Fats play a key role in body and brain development. They also help your body absorb essential micronutrients such as vitamins A, D, E and K.</p><p>You might have heard or read that all fat is bad, but there are healthier and less healthy fats. Oily fish, nuts, seeds, avocados and vegetable oils contain unsaturated fats. When eaten in moderation, these fats help prevent many chronic (long-term) conditions such as high cholesterol, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Less healthy fats, also known as saturated and trans fats, are found in animal products such as high-fat meats and dairy products, including butter. You can still include these foods a balanced diet, but choose leaner options when you can.</p><h2>Vitamins and minerals</h2><p>It is important to get a range of vitamins and minerals every day for your general health.</p><p>Your brain and mental wellbeing benefit from eating regularly throughout the day, roughly every three hours. Rather than zone in on any trendy ‘super foods’ or supplements, simply try to eat a colourful mix of vegetables and fruits daily. These foods contain lots of vitamins and minerals (also known as micronutrients) and phytochemicals, which may play an important role in brain health.</p><p>Iron plays a key role in regulating fatigue. Every day, aim to eat foods rich in iron, such as dark leafy greens, beans, nuts, legumes (such as chickpeas or lentils) and lean meats. Whole grains, low-fat dairy, eggs, nuts, lean meats and legumes are rich in B vitamins. These help your brain and body transform food into energy.</p><p>Remember that different foods provide different micronutrients. “Eating the rainbow” (foods of different colours) makes sure you are consuming all the vitamins and minerals your body needs.</p><p> <a href="https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/listing_of_vitamins">Harvard Health Publishing - Listing of vitamins</a></p><p> <a href="https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/tips-for-everyday-living/food-and-mood/#.XJU1eBNKiWZ">Mind (UK) - Food and mood</a></p><p> <a href="https://meant2preventkitchen.ca/">Meant2Prevent: Kitchen</a></p><h3>Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) – <a href="http://www.camh.ca/">camh.ca</a></h3><p>CAMH is a mental health and addiction teaching and research hospital that provides a wide range of clinical care services for patients of all ages and families.</p><p> <a href="https://youtu.be/qMnQFTy3t30">Mood Matters: How Food, Movement & Sleep Can Have an Impact on You</a></p>healthydiethttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/basics_of_health_diet.jpgThe basics of a healthy diet Learn about macronutrients and micronutrients and how eating a balance of these can help support your mood and general wellbeing.Teens
The right to safe spacesThe right to safe spacesThe right to safe spacesTEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-08-16T04:00:00Z11.100000000000048.00000000000001284.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Everyone has the right to receive care and services in a safe and welcoming environment. Learn more about your rights to safe spaces at school, work and in health-care environments.</p><h2>Your right to safe spaces</h2><p>You have the right to certain levels of respect, service and care in the community, whether you are a student, an employee, a patient, or a client of any other institution or business. Here is information about what you should expect of school, work and health-care environments if those institutions are fostering safe spaces.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A safe space is a place or environment where anyone can express themselves and feel confident that they will not be exposed to discrimination.</li><li>An institution should never share your personal information with others without your consent.</li><li>If you have legally changed your name and/or gender, your official records at an institution should reflect those changes.</li><li>You have the right to be addressed by a name that feels comfortable to you and a pronoun that corresponds with your gender identity.</li><li>An institution that fosters a safe space will have staff that are trained to recognize and take disciplinary action against people who discriminate, harass or bully others.</li><li>You have a right to safe restroom facilities and to use a washroom that best corresponds to your gender identity.</li><li>If you go to school and/or work for an employer that enforces a dress code, the dress code should be flexible and gender neutral.</li><li>If your school offers gender-segregated activities like physical education classes or sports programs, you have the right to participate in the activities that correspond with your gender identity.</li><li>A safe place will ensure that it is promoting a welcoming and comforting environment.</li></ul><h2>What is a safe space?</h2><p>A safe space is a place or environment where anyone can express themselves and feel confident that they will not be exposed to discrimination, harassment, or any other emotional or physical harm based on their biological sex, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, cultural background, age, or physical or mental ability. A safe space can be a dedicated physical space, or it can be the overarching principals that guide an organization.</p><h2>How should I expect to be treated in a safe space?</h2><p>Many institutions and businesses work hard to create inclusive safe spaces for their students, employees, patients and clients. It may seem like common sense to treat people kindly and with respect, but it can be helpful to have those acts of respect and dignity put into written policies.</p><p>You will know that you are in a safe space if you are provided the following:</p><h3>Privacy</h3><p>You have a right to privacy when it comes to your <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3976&language=English">personal information</a>. You may want to share certain personal information with your school, employer or health-care provider so that they may better serve your needs, but you are not required to tell them everything. This means that you can keep things like your medical history, your sexual orientation and your gender status to yourself unless there is a specific “need to know” reason to disclose them (e.g., to fulfill a specific accommodation request, to provide appropriate medical care). An institution should never share this information with others without your consent. In some cases, sharing certain information (e.g., medical information) is illegal without your consent.</p><h3>Up-to-date record keeping</h3><p>If you have legally changed your name and/or gender, your official records at an institution should reflect those changes. You may need to provide official documentation to your school, place of work and/or health-care provider so that they may make the appropriate changes in their files. This will help them prevent any mistakes in your care, how they serve you and how they address you.</p><h3>Use of your preferred name and pronouns</h3><p>No matter how you identify, it is important that the words you use to describe yourself are respected. How you are addressed can make a big difference in making you feel welcome. You have the right to be addressed by a name that feels comfortable to you and a pronoun that corresponds with your gender identity. An organization that uses <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3963&language=English">gender-inclusive language</a> in general also makes everyone feel heard and avoids mistakes made when making assumptions.</p><h3>Protection from harassment and discrimination</h3> You may be worried about telling your teachers, employer or health-care provider about your sexual orientation, your gender or your medical history. <p>You may worry that you will face discrimination, which means experiencing unjust or unfair treatment based on your personal characteristics. Discrimination violates your rights as a person and is illegal.</p><p>An institution that fosters a safe space will have staff that are trained to recognize and take disciplinary action against people who discriminate, harass or bully others.</p><p>If you feel you are facing discrimination, harassment or bullying, consider the following:</p><ul><li>Write down what happened, when and where it happened, and who was involved.</li><li>Talk to a friend, parent or guardian so that people who support you are aware of the situation.</li><li>Talk about the situation with someone in a position of authority like your teacher, principal, employer, doctor, or a human resources department (if there is one) and ask about accommodations.</li><li>Ask a legal expert to see whether the law would consider your experience to be discrimination. If it is, you can explore the possibility of taking legal action.</li><li>Look for support from a community support group. You may be able to learn from the experience of others in a similar situation.</li></ul><h3>Washroom access</h3><p>You have a right to safe restroom facilities and to use a washroom that best corresponds to your gender identity. Many institutions provide accessible all-gender single-stall washrooms for anyone who requires increased privacy, regardless of the reason. You may use one of these facilities if you are not comfortable choosing between gendered washroom facilities.</p><h3>Flexible dress codes</h3><p>Many schools and workplaces have a dress code. If you go to school and/or work for an employer that enforces a dress code, the dress code should be flexible and gender neutral. You should not have to choose between ‘male’ or ‘female’ clothing. A good dress code policy will apply to all clothing for all bodies.</p><h3>Access to gender segregated activities</h3><p>If your school offers gender-segregated activities like physical education classes or sports programs, you have the right to participate in the activities that correspond with your gender identity.</p><h3>Inclusive messaging</h3><p>A safe space will ensure that it is promoting a welcoming and comforting environment.</p><ul><li>At school this might include teaching inclusivity and diversity through the school curriculum, encouraging the start of clubs for LGBTQ2S+ students and providing a dedicated physical safe space on campus for these groups to meet.</li><li>At work this might include diversity trainings, being transparent about salaries at all levels of the organization, and taking effective steps to address and rectify incidents of harassment.</li><li>In a health-care setting this might include ensuring that the physical office space carries signs and pamphlets that are welcoming to all people (e.g., gender-neutral washroom signs), offering an interpreter to patients whose first language is not English, and providing forms that include more than two genders.</li></ul><h2>AboutKidsHealth</h2><p> <strong><a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3980&language=English">The right to safe spaces</a></strong><br> Share this article with your parents or guardian so they can learn more about your rights to safe spaces at school, work and in health-care environments.</p><p>TDSB Guidelines for the Accommodation of Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Students and Staff. <em>Toronto District School Board</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.tdsb.on.ca/Portals/0/docs/tdsb%20transgender%20accommodation%20FINAL_1_.pdf">https://www.tdsb.on.ca/Portals/0/docs/tdsb%20transgender%20accommodation%20FINAL_1_.pdf</a>.</p><p>Trans Youth at School: Y-GAP Community Bulletin. <em>Central Toronto Youth Services</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://ctys.org/wp-content/uploads/YGAP_Health.pdf">https://ctys.org/wp-content/uploads/YGAP_Health.pdf</a>.</p><p>Trans Youth at Work: Y-GAP Community Bulletin. <em>Central Toronto Youth Services</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://ctys.org/wp-content/uploads/YGAP_Work.pdf">https://ctys.org/wp-content/uploads/YGAP_Work.pdf</a>.</p><p>Trans Youth Accessing Health and Social Services: Y-GAP Community Bulletin. <em>Central Toronto Youth Services</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://ctys.org/wp-content/uploads/YGAP_Health.pdf">https://ctys.org/wp-content/uploads/YGAP_Health.pdf</a>.</p>safespaceshttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/The_right_to_safe_spaces.jpg Learn about your right to receive care and services in a safe and welcoming environment, including at school, work and in health-care environments.Teens
What to expect during a pelvic examWhat to expect during a pelvic examWhat to expect during a pelvic examWEnglishAdolescent;DevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)Pelvis;BodyReproductive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00Z9.6000000000000057.4000000000000719.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>To make sure that your reproductive organs are healthy, you should have a pelvic exam every 3 years, starting at age 25, or sooner if you are sexually active or have specific concerns. Find out what you can expect during your first pelvic exam.</p><h2>What is a pelvic exam?</h2><p>A pelvic exam (or internal exam) is a test done by a health-care provider to examine your vulva, vagina and cervix for any abnormalities. Sometimes it also involves taking a sample from the vagina or cervix to test for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or for changes that can lead to cervical cancer.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A pelvic exam is a test done to examine the vulva, vagina and cervix for abnormalities and to test for STIs and changes that can cause cervical cancer.</li><li>A pelvic exam should be done once you turn 25 and then every 3 years after that if you are sexually active; however, you may have a pelvic exam before you turn 25 if you are sexually active or if you have any specific concerns.</li><li>A pelvic exam includes external and internal visual exams to check for any abnormalities. In some cases, you may also need a physical exam to check the size, shape and position of your internal reproductive organs.</li></ul><h2>Why do I need a pelvic exam?</h2><p>There are several reasons you may need a pelvic exam. Pelvic exams are done to:</p><ul><li>Check that your internal reproductive organs are healthy and inspect your vulva and vagina for any abnormalities</li><li>Test for STIs – this is suggested every year and every new partner</li><li>Take a Pap test to check for early signs of cervical cancer – Paps should start at age 25 and only if you are sexually active</li><li>Diagnose a medical condition if you’re experiencing pelvic pain, or unusual bleeding or discharge</li></ul><p>You should have a pelvic exam once you turn 25, and then every 3 years after that if you are sexually active. You may have a pelvic exam before you turn 25 if you are sexually active or if you have any specific concerns. </p><h2>What happens during a pelvic exam?</h2><p>First, your health-care provider will ask you questions about your health and sexual activity.</p><p>A pelvic exam only takes a few minutes. It’s normal to feel nervous or shy, especially before your first pelvic exam. Remember, if you feel unsafe or uncomfortable, tell your health-care provider to stop. You may also choose to wait to do a pelvic exam at a future visit if you are feeling nervous or uncomfortable.</p><p>You will be asked to undress from the waist down and will be given a sheet to place over your lap for privacy. Then, you will lie down on your back on an exam table, with your knees bent and your feet placed in footrests. You will need to slide your body toward the end of the table and have your knees fall open to the sides.</p><p>This may feel uncomfortable, especially the first time. It’s important to listen to your provider’s instructions on how to position yourself in order to make the exam more comfortable. Don’t be afraid to ask your health-care provider about any questions or concerns you have!</p><h3>External visual exam</h3><p>The health-care provider will look at your vulva and surrounding area to check for redness, irritation, sores and any other abnormalities.</p><h3>Internal visual exam</h3><p>The health-care provider will then gently insert a metal or plastic tool called a speculum into your vagina. This is done to open the vaginal walls so they can see your vagina and cervix. </p><h3>Pap test and STI testing</h3><p>If your physical exam includes a Pap test (Pap smear), the health-care provider will swab your cervix with a small broom to collect cells. These cells are then tested for signs of cervical cancer. Swabs of the vagina or cervix may also be performed to test for STIs such as gonorrhea and chlamydia. </p> <a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Pelvic_exam.jpg" target="_blank"> <figure class="asset-small"> <img alt="Click to see pelvic exam image" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Pelvic%20exam%20click.jpg" /> </figure> </a> <h3>Bimanual or physical exam</h3><p>Your health-care provider may need to do a bimanual exam to check the size, shape and position of your internal reproductive organs including the ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus. They will insert two gloved fingers into your vagina and press on the outside of your lower abdomen (belly) with the other hand. They will check for any tenderness or abnormal growths. To see an illustration of what this exam looks like, click the image on the right.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-863348696.jpg A pelvic exam should be done once you turn 25 or sooner and then every 3 years after that. Learn what to expect during your first pelvic exam.Teens
The cancer care team: Occupational therapistThe cancer care team: Occupational therapistThe cancer care team: Occupational therapistTEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)NANAHealth care professionalsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z12.000000000000040.8000000000000425.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>An occupational therapist can help you with everyday tasks at home and at school. Find out why occupational therapy is imporant and why you might need it as part of your recovery.</p><h2>What is an occupational therapist?</h2><p>Occupational therapy is treatment to help you do everyday tasks, whether at home, at school or at work. An occupational therapist assesses, educates and offers recommendations for people with cancer and other medical conditions. They can help you to improve your ability to perform everyday tasks and help you find ways to continue to do the things you enjoy. </p><p>Occupational therapists are trained to evaluate performance and help you function as well as possible in everyday tasks by considering your motor skills (such as your co-ordination), sensory functions, and thinking skills. For example, they may recommend assistive devices—special aids that make it easier to do certain tasks like walking or hearing. </p><p>An occupational therapist may be part of the health-care team that you see frequently. Often, occupational therapists work together with physiotherapists and speech therapists as a rehabilitation team. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Occupational therapists help you improve your ability to perform everyday tasks such as eating, climbing stairs and self-care activities.</li><li>Occupational therapists will assess your abilities and make recommendations to help you with your daily tasks, including activity recommendations and assistive devices.</li></ul><h2>How can an occupational therapist help me?</h2><p>Sometimes, cancer or treatment can make it hard for you to do the simple things you used to do before, such as getting dressed, climbing stairs, or eating. An occupational therapist can help you adapt to changes in your abilities and be more independent.</p><p>The occupational therapist will discuss your goals so that they can provide therapy focused on the things that matter to you. The therapy may include working on challenges related to your body, activities, or the environment. </p><p>Some of the different things an occupational therapist can help with include:</p><ul><li>self-care activities such as dressing and grooming</li><li>school or work skills such as writing, typing, organizing, or memorizing things</li><li>leisure activities such as reading or playing computer games</li><li>home safety evaluations, to see if any changes are needed in your home to make it safer for you </li><li>assistive devices such as walking aids or special tools to open jars or cans</li><li>equipment such as wheelchairs </li><li>splinting (supporting or bracing) your joints to help you maintain movement</li><li>energy conservation (saving your energy) to make sure you don’t tire yourself out too easily </li><li>swallowing difficulties and feeding skills (with the help of a <a href="/Article?contentid=3497&language=English">speech-language pathologist</a>)</li></ul><p>Occupational therapists may work with you in the hospital, at a rehabilitation centre, at home or at school. If you are working with an occupational therapist in the hospital they will help to organize follow-up therapy if you need it. The occupational therapist will assess your abilities and needs regularly while you are working with them.</p><p>If you feel that an occupational therapist can help you, you or your family can ask your health-care team to recommend one.<br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Occupational_therapist_TTC_Cancer.jpg ​An occupational therapist can help you with everyday tasks. Find out why you might need occupational therapy as part of your recovery. Teens
Dating with celiac diseaseDating with celiac diseaseDating with celiac diseaseDEnglishGastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2023-09-26T04:00:00Z8.8000000000000064.1000000000000993.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>You may have a range of emotions and concerns about dating with celiac disease. Learn how assessing your comfort level, clearly communicating your needs and planning ahead can help make the experience more enjoyable.</p><p>Dating is a way to learn more about someone you like and to let them know about you. For example, you might share details about having celiac disease to help your date know you better and understand your need for gluten-free foods and activities. You might also choose not to share your celiac disease diagnosis. Here are some tips for navigating dating as someone living with celiac disease.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Navigating the dating scene can be difficult when you have celiac disease. </li><li>Before you start dating, think about your comfort level with sharing your diagnosis and explaining your need to follow a strict gluten-free diet.</li><li>Clear communication and planning can help make a date more enjoyable. </li><li>Remember that celiac disease does not define you! Your value does not change because of your diagnosis.</li></ul><h2>Assess your comfort level</h2><p>Before you start dating, you may want to think about when to tell your date about your diagnosis of celiac disease and the need to follow a strict gluten-free diet. </p><p>If you feel comfortable sharing with your date that you have celiac disease, be open about what this means for you and explain your gluten-free diet. If you want to plan a date that involves going out to eat, you may also want to suggest places that you are comfortable navigating or have been to before and know can safely provide gluten-free meals. </p><p>If you aren’t comfortable sharing right away that you have celiac disease, you may want to plan a date that doesn’t revolve around food. </p><p>Depending on who you date or how long you have been dating, your comfort level may change. This is normal! </p><h2>Communication is key</h2><p>Communication is an important part of building a healthy relationship. Once when you are ready and comfortable, you may decide that you want to tell your date about your diagnosis of celiac disease and need for a gluten-free diet. Sometimes, it can be hard to know exactly what to say. Here are some examples of how to communicate your diagnosis for the first time: </p><ul><li>“I would love to hang out again and get to know you more, but before we do that, I think it’s important for you to know that I have celiac disease, which means I need to follow a strict gluten-free diet. There are a few restaurant spots that I know of that have gluten-free options. Would you be interested in going to any of these restaurants for our next date? [List two to three restaurants you know can safely accommodate your gluten-free diet.]”</li><li>“Just so you know, I have been diagnosed with celiac disease, which means I have to follow a gluten-free diet. I am still learning how to follow this diet and build up my comfort level with dining out. Would it be okay if we plan our next date at [suggest a non-food-related activity or spot] or hang out at my house?” </li><li>“I have to eat gluten-free for celiac disease, so I’ll have to talk to the server about my meal to make sure it’s gluten-free and prepared safely.”</li></ul><p>There are other important things to tell your date about managing celiac disease. For example, exposure to gluten, even in the smallest amount (this might come from sharing foods, from surfaces or a kiss), can make you feel very sick. Encourage your date to wash their hands after eating and offer a new travel toothbrush for them to brush their teeth and rinse their mouth to minimize gluten exposure. </p><p>Non-food products like lip products and hand lotions can also contain gluten. Ask your date if they are wearing any of these products and suggest they look into the ingredients for gluten before seeing you next. If they are not sure, ask them to send you a picture of the ingredients for you both to review together. </p><h2>Plan ahead</h2><p>If you will be going out to eat, suggest restaurants that you know are safe for you or call ahead to make sure the restaurant you plan to go to can provide safe gluten-free options. </p><p>There are many date options that do not involve food. If you prefer not to go to a restaurant or you are not comfortable with having to navigate dining out with your date, consider these non-food related date activities:</p><ul><li>Try something athletic like bowling, mini golf or going to a batting cage. </li><li>Visit a museum or an art gallery. </li><li>Enjoy the outdoors with a bike ride, hike or a walk around the neighborhood. </li><li>Attend a class like a paint night or a yoga, pottery, spin or dance class. </li><li>Embrace Canadian winters by going ice skating, skiing or building a snowman or fort. </li><li>Organize a board game or trivia night with friends. </li><li>Take your puzzle and riddle skills to the next level by attempting an escape room. </li><li>Do something festive. In the fall or winter, you might carve pumpkins, watch holiday movies, go apple picking or make holiday cards or decorations.</li></ul><h2>Navigating your significant other's family and friends</h2><p>If you choose to pursue a relationship, you will likely be invited to family and/or friend gatherings. This may mean you will have to share your diagnosis and details about the strict gluten-free diet with others. You may want to have a conversation with your significant other about your expectations around support in these settings. Although there are things you can do to make sure you follow your gluten-free diet and feel safe, having a supportive partner in your corner can make things much easier. </p><p>Whether or not the date goes well, or you decide to pursue a relationship, remember that having celiac disease does not define you. There are many things that make you who you are beyond living with celiac disease.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Dating_with_celiac_disease-Teen.jpg ​Learn how assessing your comfort level, clearly communicating your needs and planning ahead can help make dating with celiac disease more enjoyable. Teens
Self-care tips for teens living with celiac diseaseSelf-care tips for teens living with celiac diseaseSelf-care tips for teens living with celiac diseaseSEnglishAdolescent;GastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)NADigestive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2023-10-11T04:00:00Z9.3000000000000054.3000000000000769.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Being diagnosed with celiac disease and navigating the strict gluten-free diet can be tough. Learn how incorporating self-care activities into your routine can help you reduce stress, manage symptoms and build resilience.</p><h2>What is self-care?</h2><p>Self-care means taking action to protect or improve your physical, mental and emotional health and wellness. Many resources focus on individual self-care strategies, but it's important to remember that wellness is a shared responsibility. This page includes ways to care for yourself as an individual, as well as ways for your family and friends to help and support you.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Self-care is taking action to protect and improve your physical, mental and emotional health and wellness.</li><li>Self-care can look different for everyone. For someone with celiac disease, self-care involves doing things for your general well-being and to help prevent gluten exposure.</li><li>Self-care is not selfish! Wellness is a shared responsibility.</li></ul><h2>Celiac disease and self-care</h2><p>Self-care can look different for everyone. For a person with celiac disease, self-care involves:</p><ul><li>doing things for your general well-being</li><li>developing habits to help prevent gluten exposure</li><li>having a plan for how you will recover after an exposure to gluten</li></ul><p>Following a strict gluten-free diet can be difficult and sometimes feel lonely, frustrating and exhausting. Incorporating routine self-care activities can help you reduce stress, manage symptoms and <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=3778&language=english">build resilience</a> (the ability to adapt to and navigate something difficult or stressful).</p><p>Here are ten self-care practices you may want to try:</p><ol><li> <strong>Include movement in your day.</strong> Getting at least 30 minutes of physical activity can help you boost your mood and improve your health. This can be any kind of movement. For example, you might join your school's sports team, go for a walk with your family or dance to your favourite music in your bedroom.</li><li> <strong>Eat well-balanced, regular meals and snacks.</strong> Having meals and snacks that incorporate fruits and vegetables, a protein source and a gluten-free whole grain can improve your energy levels and nourish your body.</li><li> <strong>Prepare gluten-free meals and snacks in advance</strong> so that you have safe gluten-free options available when you need them. This can help you focus on having fun at events or hangouts instead of worrying about whether you will have safe food options.</li><li> <strong>Get a good night's sleep!</strong> Sleep is important for brain health and development and for keeping up your energy levels. Stick to a regular bedtime and create a relaxing nighttime routine that involves removing devices (tablets, phones, etc.) at least one hour before bed.</li><li> <strong>Advocate for yourself.</strong> <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=4161&language=english&hub=celiacdisease">Self-advocacy</a> means speaking up for yourself, supporting yourself and making decisions that are in your best interest. Try using the <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=3581&language=english">MyHealth 3 Sentence Summary</a> to practise summarizing and communicating your health needs or important information to others, including your health-care team, teachers and peers.</li><li> <strong>Be mindful.</strong> Mindfulness is paying attention to what's happening in the present moment in the mind, body and external environment with curiosity and kindness. It can help you steady your emotions and find out what you need. Mindfulness can also help build self-compassion, gratitude and resilience. See <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=3941&language=english&hub=celiacdisease">Mindfulness meditations for celiac disease</a> for guided meditations that can help you relax, focus on your thoughts and cope with pain and stress related to managing celiac disease.</li><li> <strong>Practise gratitude.</strong> Practising gratitude is another way to be mindful. Remind yourself of the daily things that you are grateful for and write them down at night or get into a routine of saying them out loud before bed.</li><li> <strong>Stay connected.</strong> Surround yourself with friends and family who understand you and your celiac disease needs and who will help advocate for you. Reach out to them when you need to talk.</li><li> <strong>Give yourself permission to say no.</strong> Sometimes self-care involves saying no to activities or events that do not serve you well.</li><li> <strong>Create a self-care plan for when you are accidentally exposed to gluten.</strong> Note the symptoms you experience when exposed to gluten and brainstorm ways to help you feel better. This might be wearing comfy clothes, taking a bubble bath or using a heating pad. You may also want to work with your parents or caregivers to make sure you have easy-to-digest gluten-free foods (e.g., gluten-free plain crackers or bread, white rice, potatoes, bananas) and fluids (e.g., water, broths, peppermint tea) on hand. Communicate your self-care plan to your family or friends so they know how to best support you when you are accidentally exposed to gluten.</li></ol><p>Remember, self-care is not selfish! Incorporating routine self-care activities can help protect and maintain your health and well-being.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Self-care_tips_for_teens_living_with_celiac_disease.jpgSelf-care tips for teens with celiac disease Learn how incorporating self-care activities into your routine can help you reduce stress, manage symptoms and build resilience.Teens

 

 

Sickle cell diseaseSickle cell diseaseSickle cell diseaseSEnglishHaematologyTeen (13-18 years)NACardiovascular system;Arteries;Capillaries;VeinsConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)Fatigue;Joint or muscle pain;Pain2023-11-22T05:00:00ZLanding Page (Overview)Collection Hub<p>Learn about sickle cell disease, including its signs and symptoms and how it's treated. Also find information, tips and stories from other teens to help you manage sickle cell pain.</p><h2>Welcome to the iCanCope with Sickle Cell Pain program!</h2><p>This learning hub provides advice and tips to help you manage your sickle cell pain and in-depth information to answer questions.</p><p>Check out the sickle cell library, under About sickle cell disease, for background information on a range of topics related to sickle cell disease. Visit the skills modules, under Managing sickle cell pain, for information, tips and stories from other teens to help you manage your condition. </p><p>Don’t forget, the information provided by the iCanCope with Sickle Cell Pain program does not replace the expert advice from your health-care team! Always talk to your team first if you have any questions about your health.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iCanCopeSCD/ICCSC_hero.jpgSCDSCD Learn about sickle cell disease and find information, tips, stories from other teens and quizzes to help you learn how to manage your condition.Teens
Cystic fibrosisCystic fibrosisCystic fibrosisCEnglishRespiratoryPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)LungsRespiratory systemTeen (13-18 years)NA2023-01-25T05:00:00ZLanding PageLearning Hub<p>Find out about cystic fibrosis and what you need to know to take care of it. Learn about how it can affect things such as exercise, nutrition and sleep and what you can do about it. Find resources to help you understand your rights with regards to your health care and help you to transition to adult care.</p><p>Find out about cystic fibrosis and what you need to know to take care of it. Learn about how it can affect things such as exercise, nutrition and sleep and what you can do about it. Find resources to help you understand your rights with regards to your health care and help you to transition to adult care.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">About cystic fibrosis</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn about cystic fibrosis and how to take care of yourself.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4104&language=English">Cystic fibrosis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4196&language=English">How cystic fibrosis affects your body</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4106&language=English">Medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4194&language=English">CFTR modulators: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4195&language=English">CFTR modulators: Diet and lifestyle modifications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Living with cystic fibrosis</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn about cystic fibrosis and physical activity, nutrition, sleep and infection control.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4111&language=English">Living with cystic fibrosis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4108&language=English">Airway clearance techniques</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4112&language=English">Physical activity and exercise</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4107&language=English">Using a nebulizer and compressor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4113&language=English">Nutrition</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4114&language=English">Infection control</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4109&language=English">Clinic appointment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4110&language=English">The health-care team</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Mental health and chronic conditions</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Understand how having a chronic condition can affect your mental health.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">Sleep and your mental health: Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3633&language=English">Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routine</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3780&language=English">Adjusting to life with a chronic condition</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3779&language=English">Supporting your mental health and wellbeing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3810&language=English">Anxiety and anxiety disorders</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3983&language=English">Depression and depressive disorders</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Your rights and managing your own care</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>You have rights when it comes to making your own health-care decisions. Learn about your rights to managing your own care, how to demonstrate that you are capable of making your own health-care decisions, and your rights to privacy in a health-care setting.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3996&language=English">Knowing your rights in a health-care setting</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3993&language=English">Consent and capacity in health care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3994&language=English">What is confidentiality?</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">What do I need to know about transitioning to adult care</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Moving from paediatric health care to adult care can be both exciting and stressful. Learn what to expect when making the switch to adult care, and how to prepare for taking charge of your own care.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3916&language=English">Transitioning to adult care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3917&language=English">Transitioning through health care as a teenager: Timeline</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3918&language=English">Moving on: Higher education</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3919&language=English">Moving on: Working</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3920&language=English">Managing your finances</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3921&language=English">Getting involved in your community</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3922&language=English">Factors to consider when leaving home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3978&language=English">Finding a primary health-care provider</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3923&language=English">Transitioning to adult care: Resources</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Resources to help you cope with pain and stress</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Videos and meditations to help you understand your situation more clearly and help you cope with stressful thoughts and experiences.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/nQdM_Cku9pA">A moment of peace</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/cFCiUlFKuO4">Two wings to fly</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/jaNAwy3XsfI">Being with all of your experiences</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/0QXmmP4psbA">You are not your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/Ty93GRPplJo">Dealing with difficult moments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/QTsUEOUaWpY">Everyday mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/GgBVIZAEQqU">STOP for mindfulness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EWzDHN7Jdg8">Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EnrNtaMskik">Breathing meditation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EL_fvAepwv8">Equal breathing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/EL_fvAepwv8">Comfort your pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/YnL-hjXo4EQ">Self-compassion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/fZdw6wm3A3E">Body scan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/xcO8IIeV12M">Mindfulness of thought</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://youtu.be/3IK7yWuEs3k">Visualize your pain</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Cystic%20fibrosis%20teen.jpgcysticfibrosis Find out about cystic fibrosis and what you need to know to take care of it, including how it affects exercise, nutrition and sleep.Teens
JIAJIAJIAJEnglishNATeen (13-18 years)NANANATeen (13-15 years)NA2018-03-16T04:00:00ZLanding PageLearning Hub<p>The Taking Charge: Managing JIA Online Program provides teens with information on different types of JIA, managing symptoms, and coping with JIA management now and in the future.<br></p><p>The Taking Charge: Managing JIA Online Program provides teens with information on different types of JIA, managing symptoms, and coping with JIA management now and in the future.<br></p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Getting started</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Welcome to the Taking Charge: Managing JIA Online Program! In this section you will learn what to expect in the program, how to get started and how to set goals to better manage JIA.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2550&language=English">Introduction: Goals of this session and getting started</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2551&language=English">Goal setting in JIA</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">About JIA<br></h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>JIA stands for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Find out what causes JIA, the different types of JIA and how it will affect you now and in the future.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Overview</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2552&language=English">What is JIA?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2553&language=English">What causes JIA?</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Different types of JIA</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2554&language=English">Types of JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2555&language=English">Oligoarticular JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2556&language=English">Polyarticular JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2557&language=English">Systemic JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2558&language=English">Enthesitis-related JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2559&language=English">Psoriatic JIA</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Effects of JIA</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2560&language=English">How will JIA affect you?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2561&language=English">Complications of JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2562&language=English">Eye problems and JIA</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Diagnosis of JIA<br></h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Diagnosing JIA may be difficult as joint pain and swelling may be a part of many different illnesses. Diagnosis of JIA typically includes a physical exam, blood tests and imaging studies.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Diagnostic tests</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2563&language=English">Diagnosing JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2564&language=English">Blood tests and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2565&language=English">Imaging tests and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2566&language=English">Bone scan and bone density and JIA</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Coping with diagnosis</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2567&language=English">Coping with a JIA diagnosis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2568&language=English">Regular check-ups for JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2569&language=English">Regular eye exams for JIA</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Managing symptoms<br></h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Pain, stiffness, and tiredness or fatigue, are common symptoms of JIA. These symptoms can lead to difficulties with participating in school and sports activities, and enjoying time with your friends. Learn about pain, fatigue, and stiffness, how to manage symptoms and how these symptoms can cause stress.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Managing pain</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2570&language=English">What is pain?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2571&language=English">Medications for pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2572&language=English">Physical methods to treat pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2573&language=English">Coping strategies for pain</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Managing fatigue</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2574&language=English">What is fatigue?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2575&language=English">Medications for fatigue</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2576&language=English">Physical methods to improve fatigue</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2577&language=English">Coping strategies for fatigue</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Managing stiffness</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2578&language=English">What is stiffness?</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Managing stress</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2579&language=English">What is stress?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2580&language=English">What causes stress?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2581&language=English">Symptoms of stress</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2582&language=English">Managing your stress</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Your plan for managing symptoms</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2583&language=English">Your plan for managing symptoms</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Coping strategies<br></h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>There are several strategies you can use to help you cope with pain, stress, and sleep problems. These include relaxation, distraction, and managing your thoughts. In this section, learn more about how each of these strategies work.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Relaxation</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2584&language=English">What is relaxation?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2585&language=English">Ways to relax</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2586&language=English">Relaxation with tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2587&language=English">Relaxation without tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2588&language=English">Mini relaxation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2589&language=English">Behaviour rehearsal</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Distraction</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2590&language=English">What is distraction?</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Managing your thoughts</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2591&language=English">Becoming aware of your thoughts</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2592&language=English">Changing unhelpful thoughts</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">JIA medications<br></h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>When you know about your medications, you can talk to your doctor about them and make good choices for yourself. Find out about the different types of JIA medications, how they work, common side effects, and the importance of talking to your doctor about your medication plan.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2593&language=English">Overview of JIA medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2594&language=English">Taking JIA medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2595&language=English">Types of JIA medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2596&language=English">Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2597&language=English">Corticosteroids for JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2598&language=English">Corticosteroid injections for JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2599&language=English">Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2600&language=English">Biologic agents for JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2601&language=English">Other questions about JIA medications</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Other types of care for JIA</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p> Did you know that there are many other therapies that you can use to manage JIA symptoms? They can help to prevent complications so that you can do all the things you want to do. In this section, learn more about physical, occupational, and psychological therapies; maintaining healthy nutrition; surgical options for JIA, and more.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Physiotherapy</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2602&language=English">Physiotherapy and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2603&language=English">Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and JIA</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Exercise and yoga</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2604&language=English">Exercise and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2605&language=English">Yoga</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2606&language=English">Basic yoga poses</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2607&language=English">Yoga poses for tension relief</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2608&language=English">Yoga poses for muscle strengthening</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Occupational therapy</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2610&language=English">Occupational therapy and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2611&language=English">Footwear and orthotics for JIA</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Other types of care</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2609&language=English">Nutrition and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2612&language=English">Psychological therapy and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2613&language=English">Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) for JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2614&language=English">Surgical procedures and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2615&language=English">Eye care and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2616&language=English">Dental care and JIA</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Therapies, self-monitoring and supports</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Your role in making decisions about your treatment plan is very important. Your health-care team and other members of your support system are available to help you make these decisions. In turn, they can help you to manage your JIA. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2617&language=English">Getting the most from JIA treatments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2618&language=English">Self-monitoring: How to recognize JIA symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2619&language=English">Getting the most from your support systems</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2620&language=English">Talking to your doctor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2621&language=English">Speaking alone with your doctor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2622&language=English">Talking to your teacher</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2623&language=English">Dealing with bullying</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Your lifestyle</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Whether you have JIA or not, you need to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Find out how to stay healthy and active, learn about puberty and relationships, healthy body image, and making healthy lifestyle choices.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2624&language=English">Staying active</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2625&language=English">Eating healthy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2626&language=English">Getting enough sleep</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2627&language=English">Puberty, relationships and JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2628&language=English">Feeling good about yourself</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2629&language=English">Lifestyle choices and JIA</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Looking ahead</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Sometime between the ages of 18 to 22, you most likely will transition from your pediatric rheumatologist to the adult health care setting. At that time, there are a number of things you, your family, and your health-care team can do to help make this change go smoothly.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2630&language=English">Transitioning to adult health care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2631&language=English">Birth control and pregnancy </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2632&language=English">Moving on: Higher education</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2633&language=English">Moving on: Working</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2634&language=English">Maintaining your treatment program</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2635&language=English">Coping with symptoms, stress, flare-ups and setbacks</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2636&language=English">The future of JIA</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2637&language=English">JIA resources</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/encouraging_healthy_coping_behaviors_JIA_US.jpgjiateenhub ​Learn about the different types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and find tips for managing symptoms and coping with JIA management. Teens
Living with hand and upper limb conditionsLiving with hand and upper limb conditionsLiving with hand and upper limb conditionsLEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)Arm;NeckNAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-12-20T05:00:00ZLanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they do home, school, work, and leisure activities in their own way.</p><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they do home, school, work, and leisure activities in their own way.</p><p>The Embracing Our Limb Differences series is a video library of young people just like you with arm and hand differences doing a variety of tasks including opening a jar, shampooing their hair, typing on a computer, and many more.</p> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUy1XfS9MxGrWZ38ifea3LM" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div><p>To view other AboutKidsHealth videos, please visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidsHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">About the Embracing Our Differences series</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The Embracing Our Differences series is a video library of young people with arm and hand differences doing a variety of tasks. Learn how to submit your own video tutorial.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4002&language=English">Living with hand and upper limb conditions: Embracing Our Differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Grooming and personal care activities</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they perform grooming and other personal care activities in their own way.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4003&language=English">Performing grooming and personal care activities with arm and hand differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Kitchen activities</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they perform kitchen activities in their own way.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4004&language=English">Performing kitchen activities with arm and hand differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">School, work and computer-based activities</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they perform school, work and computer-based activities in their own way.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4005&language=English">Performing school, work, and computer-based activities with arm and hand differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Resources</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>View the entire Embracing Our Differences series and other resources.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUy1XfS9MxGrWZ38ifea3LM">Embracing Our Differences series playlist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/plastic-reconstructive-surgery/#programs">SickKids Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Clinic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.waramps.ca/ways-we-help/child-amputees/">The CHAMP Program </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/our-services/about-your-visit/virtual-tour/prosthetic-services">Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Prosthetic Department</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/limb-differences-learning-hub.jpghandlimbconditionsTeens

 

 

Performing grooming and personal care activities with arm and hand differencesPerforming grooming and personal care activities with arm and hand differencesPerforming grooming and personal care activities with arm and hand differencesPEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)Arm;NeckNAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Applying_makeup_with_a_limb_difference.jpg2021-12-20T05:00:00Z9.8000000000000057.9000000000000672.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they perform hygiene, hair and personal care activities in their own way.</p><h2>Hygiene, hair and personal care</h2><p>Many young people with arm and hand differences use adaptive strategies and aids to help them perform personal care tasks.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>There are a variety of adaptive techniques and aids you can use to help you to keep objects steady and/or perform tasks with one or two limbs when grooming and caring for your hygiene.</li><li>There are many ways you can adapt to performing different personal care tasks. Find what works best for you!</li></ul><h2>Aids</h2><p>There are a variety of adaptive aids you can use to help you perform personal care tasks. Below are just a few of many aids that are available to you:</p><ul><li>Long handled brushes or combs, sponges and shavers</li><li>Hand-held shower heads</li><li>Long handled sponges</li><li>Universal cuffs and built-up handles to aid in holding/gripping any personal care items such as deodorants, shavers, brushes and combs</li><li>A clipper that is fixed in place (nailed or glued to a surface)</li></ul><h2>Adaptive strategies</h2><p>The way that you perform personal care tasks is unique to you and your particular hand or arm difference. There is no “right way” of doing these tasks; do them the way that works the best for you! </p><p>Watch the videos below to see how Alicia and Lauren, young women with brachial plexus injury, adapt to the tasks of washing and styling their hair.<br></p><h3>Washing and styling hair</h3><p><strong>Applying shampoo and conditioner: Embracing Our Limb Differences – Alicia</strong></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-5T3OuwI3hg" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br> </div><p>Alicia is a young adult with a left brachial plexus birth injury who had difficulty shampooing and conditioning her hair. She demonstrates how she overcame this challenge by using a shower dispenser or dispensing the product on her forearm and using her dominant hand to scoop up the product.</p><p><strong>Styling my hair: Embracing Our Limb Differences – Lauren</strong></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-F_yzKLMBrs" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br> </div><p>Lauren is a young adult with a right brachial plexus birth injury who had difficulty putting her hair in a ponytail or bun and drying her hair. She demonstrates how she overcame these challenges by using a counter or wall for support when tying up her hair and using a hair dryer brush to dry her hair.</p><h3>Getting dressed</h3><p>Watch the videos below to see how Audrey adapts to the tasks of putting on and taking off different types of shirts and pants.</p><p><strong>Putting on and taking off shirts: Embracing Our Limb Differences – Audrey</strong></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zpU9Cvlotlg" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br> </div><p>Audrey is a young adult with a left brachial plexus birth injury. She demonstrates how she puts on and takes off short-sleeve shirts, sweaters and blouses with buttons using just one hand.<br></p><p><strong>Putting on and taking off pants: Embracing Our Limb Differences – Audrey</strong></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ljx-EQSQkt0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br> </div><p>Audrey is a young adult with a left brachial plexus birth injury. She demonstrates how she puts on and takes off pants and leggings using just one hand.<br></p><h3>Applying makeup</h3><p><strong>Applying makeup: Embracing Our Limb Differences – Sheriauna</strong></p><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9euhVoNVFZ0?si=bCBS8h9vvchtCT3c" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br> </div><p>Sheriauna is a young adult who is a below-the-elbow amputee. She demonstrates how she applies her makeup, including foundation, blush, mascara and highlighter.</p><p>There are many other ways you can adapt, like Alicia, Lauren, Audrey and Sheriauna, to performing different personal care tasks. Check back to this page to watch other videos on how other young people with arm and hand differences perform various grooming tasks.</p><p>To view the entire Embracing Our differences library, click <a href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUy1XfS9MxGrWZ38ifea3LM">here</a>.</p><h2>Tell us what you think</h2><p>Please click on the survey below to let us know if these videos were helpful:<br><a href="https://redcapexternal.research.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=NX4DHTKTRL">Post Video Survey</a></p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p> <strong>SickKids Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Clinic</strong><br><a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/plastic-reconstructive-surgery/#programs">https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/plastic-reconstructive-surgery/#programs</a></p><ul><li>Congenital Upper Limb Differences Program</li><li>Brachial Plexus Palsy and Nerve injuries clinic</li></ul><p>For more information on the Embracing Our Differences series, email: <a href="mailto:hand.arm@sickkids.ca">hand.arm@sickkids.ca</a>.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <strong>The CHAMP Program</strong><br> <a href="https://www.waramps.ca/ways-we-help/child-amputees/">https://www.waramps.ca/ways-we-help/child-amputees/</a></p><p>The Child Amputee (CHAMP) Program offers comprehensive services to child amputees and their families, including financial assistance, regional seminars and peer support.</p><p> <strong>Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Prosthetic Department</strong><br> <a href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/our-services/about-your-visit/virtual-tour/prosthetic-services">https://hollandbloorview.ca/our-services/about-your-visit/virtual-tour/prosthetic-services</a></p><p>The Holland Bloorview Prosthetic Services Department provide custom-fitted devices and innovative solutions for clients who were born without a limb or who have lost a limb due to injury or health conditions. They offer a full range of services, including assessment, prescription, custom manufacturing, training and repair of prosthetic devices.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/AKH%20Social%20Media/Teens_Brachial%20Plexus_Grooming%20Activities.jpgApplying makeup with arm and hand differences Sheriauna is a young adult who is a below-the-elbow amputee. In this video, she demonstrates how she applies her makeup.Teenshttps://youtu.be/9euhVoNVFZ0
Anxiety and anxiety disordersAnxiety and anxiety disordersAnxiety and anxiety disordersAEnglishAdolescent;PsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/feeling-tense-or-restless.png2021-09-30T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Everyone experiences some anxiety but sometimes anxiety can interfere with daily routines. Learn about the symptoms, causes and treatments for anxiety.</p><h2>What is anxiety?</h2><p>Anxiety is a normal feeling that everyone experiences. It acts as your body’s alarm system to warn you of a threat so you can either fight it or flee from it.</p><p>Everyone feels anxious or nervous sometimes. For instance, we all might feel scared if a car is approaching too fast. Some of us might also feel nervous before a test or before going somewhere like a new school or meeting new people. If you can manage the anxiety and it does not prevent you from doing things, then your anxiety is helpful.</p><h2>What is an anxiety disorder? </h2><p>When someone has an anxiety disorder, their anxiety interferes with their ability to do things. An anxiety disorder is usually diagnosed when a person’s anxiety prevents them from doing things that would be normal for someone their age to do. </p><p>For instance, you might have an anxiety disorder if your anxiety prevents you from going to school, spending time away from your family, doing well at school or with sports, or being with your friends. </p><h2>What are the signs and symptoms of an anxiety disorder?</h2><p>A big symptom of an anxiety disorder is excessive worrying, to the point that you can’t control or stop it. You might worry about lots of different things such as the future, your family, your friends, things you have said or done, your health, your school marks or making mistakes. </p><p>Another major symptom is that your anxiety makes you avoid even fun things.</p><p>Other major signs and symptoms of anxiety include:</p><ul><li>difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep </li><li>nightmares that wake you up in the middle of the night </li><li>stomach aches, headaches, generally feeling unwell</li><li>restlessness or irritability</li><li>feeling tense and not being able to relax</li><li>difficulty concentrating</li><li>feeling too shy or too uncomfortable with new people</li><li>difficulty speaking with friends or other kids </li></ul><div class="symptoms-container" id="symp-anxiety"> <a href="#" class="symp-fullscreen"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/CoverPhoto.png" alt="" /></a> <a href="#" class="symp-close-full material-icons pull-right">close</a> <div class="instruction-container"><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL</span></div><div class="thumbnail-col"><div class="symp-title"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL</span> </div></div><div class="anim-instructions"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/Icons_Intro_Characters_Anxiety.png" alt="" /> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Stomach aches or headaches</span> <p>Many people develop stomach aches or headaches when they feel anxious. This is because blood flows from the stomach and head to the muscles and heart in preparation of facing a threat.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/stomach-aches-headaches.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Faster heartbeat and breathing</span> <p>Your heart rate naturally speeds up when you are feeling tense or anxious about something. A faster heartbeat prepares you to run fast or fight any scary threat</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/faster-heartbeat-breathing.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Difficulty falling or staying asleep</span> <p>When you are worrying too much it may be difficult to stop thinking and that makes it hard to relax and fall asleep.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/difficulty-falling-staying-asleep.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Feeling tense or restless</span> <p>When you feel anxious, your muscles typically tense up, as if they are waiting for something bad to happen. This tension can make you feel restless or “on edge”</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/feeling-tense-or-restless.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Excessive worrying</span> <p>Someone with anxiety might worry about many different things such as school marks, friends, things they have said and done, making mistakes or their future.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/excessive-worrying.png?RenditionID=10" alt="Excessive worrying" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Difficulty meeting new people</span> <p>Because of their worries about what they say or do, someone with anxiety might find it harder to talk with people they do not know.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/difficulty-meeting-new-people.png?RenditionID=10" alt="Difficulty meeting new people" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Difficulty concentrating</span> <p>If a person has frequent anxious thoughts about many areas of their life, it is understandable that they may find it hard to concentrate on individual tasks</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/difficulty-concentrating.png?RenditionID=10" alt="Difficulty concentrating" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Avoiding fun activities</span> <p>Someone with an anxiety disorder may avoid something that would usually be enjoyable because they worry that it is too hard, they will make a mistake or that others might laugh at them.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anxiety/avoiding-fun-activities.png?RenditionID=10" alt="Avoiding fun activities" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><br></div></div><h3 class="main-title">ANXIETY <span class="symp-subtitle">Common Signs</span></h3></div><h2>How common are anxiety disorders?</h2><p>Anxiety disorders are very, very common. In fact, they are the most common mental health condition. They affect up to one in every five people. In other words, four kids in a class of twenty may have an anxiety disorder. </p><p>Anxiety disorders can develop at any age – children as young as three or four can have an anxiety disorder. Others may not develop an anxiety disorder until they are in high school.</p><h2>What causes an anxiety disorder?</h2><p>Many researchers are working to understand what exactly causes an anxiety disorder. At the moment, they believe the causes include a mix of genes (for example a family history of anxiety) and factors in your environment.</p><h2>What makes an anxiety disorder more likely?</h2><p>The things that make an anxiety disorder more likely are called risk factors. </p><p>One risk factor is having a family member, such as a parent or sibling, with an anxiety disorder. There is also some evidence to suggest that depression in family members may be another risk factor. </p><p>Some people are naturally more shy, quiet and cautious than others, right from the time they’re born. This is known as your natural temperament. This way of being can be associated with an increased risk of having an anxiety disorder. But it is also important to know that an anxiety disorder does not develop in all shy, quiet or cautious people. </p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jaNAwy3XsfI?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Being with all of your experiences</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This animation explains why pushing away unwanted thoughts, feelings and sensations can often make a situation worse. Use it when you are finding it hard to focus on the people and things that are important to you, or if you are spending too much energy avoiding your unwanted thoughts or feelings. After the video, take a moment to let all of your thoughts, feelings and sensations be with you, without pushing any of them away.</p></div><h2>How is an anxiety disorder diagnosed?</h2><p>There is no medical test for an anxiety disorder. A physician or nurse practitioner can make an initial diagnosis from talking with you and your parents and understanding how your anxiety affects your everyday life. </p><p>Sometimes your health-care provider may suggest you see a psychiatrist (a medical doctor who specializes in mental health) or a psychologist (a mental health specialist) to get a confirmed diagnosis using their expertise. The psychiatrist or psychologist will also make a diagnosis from talking to you and your parents to understand how your anxiety interferes with your ability to do things. </p><h2>How are anxiety disorders treated?</h2><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EnrNtaMskik?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title">Breathing</span><span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> Use the meditation when you’d like to refocus, take a break or reset your day. Follow along with the meditation, taking time to focus on your natural in-breath and out-breath without any judgment, counting or visualization.</p></div><p>Remember that a little anxiety can be a good thing – for example, feeling a little anxious about a test can help motivate you to study harder. However, when anxiety doesn’t let you do things that you need or like to do, then you might need to seek out treatment.</p><p>The first step in treatment is talking to someone. A special type of talk therapy called cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help. CBT helps people understand the link between their thoughts, feelings and actions. A CBT therapist can also help you learn relaxation strategies such as deep breathing or muscle relaxation. CBT typically takes place once a week for about eight to 14 weeks.</p><p>Other types of talk therapy can also be helpful. Sometimes family therapy may be a good idea as well. Family therapy can be done together with your family members or close relations and can be beneficial if there is a lot of family tension or conflict. This type of therapy can help your family to better understand and support each other, and help you improve communication.</p><p>With moderate to severe anxiety, a doctor might suggest a trial of medications called serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SHc8hi76ZSY?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Overwhelmed: Managing feelings and racing thoughts</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> We all get overwhelmed sometimes. Whether you are overwhelmed by too many feelings, too many tasks to do at once or too many racing thoughts, this video can help you hit the pause button to allow you to care for yourself and find out what you need right now.</p></div><h2>How to manage your anxiety at home</h2><p>Good sleep habits, good eating habits and regular exercise can help manage anxiety. You can also help yourself by reducing your daily intake of caffeine (such as coffee and caffeinated soft drinks or energy drinks). </p><p>It is also a good idea to cut down on your use of social media, and screen time in general. Listening to music or podcasts or following along with some relaxation or meditation apps may also help ease anxiety. In addition, you can try deep breathing, muscle relaxation exercises, mindfulness and silent meditation. </p><p>Click through the following interactive for ways you can use your five senses to distract yourself.</p><div class="asset-animation asset-cv-animation"> <iframe src="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/AKH/animations/YMHP-Distractions/MentalHealth-Distractions.html"></iframe> <br></div><p></p><div class="asset-video"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kHbTskmIJUk"></iframe> </div> <h2>When should I see a health-care provider? </h2><p>Go see a health-care provider when anxiety does not let you do things that you want to do, like being with your friends, doing well at school, or being without your family or parents.</p><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. Please take 5 minutes to complete our <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey</a>.</p><p>The following resources offer useful advice and information about anxiety.</p><p> <a href="https://anxietycanada.com/">Anxiety Canada</a> – Provides free, online resources on anxiety and anxiety disorders, as well as an app for youth and young adults to help them manage anxiety.</p><p>Benoit, D., & Monga, S. (2018). <em>Taming Sneaky Fears – Leo the Lion’s Story of Bravery & Inside Leo’s Den: The Workbook</em>. FriesenPress.</p><p>Huebner, D. (2005). <em>What to Do When You Worry Too Much: A Kid’s Guide to Overcoming Anxiety</em>. Magination Press.</p><h3>Kids Help Phone – <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">https://kidshelpphone.ca/</a></h3><p>Kids Help Phone is a 24/7 e-mental health service offering free, confidential support to young people.</p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/calm-your-anxiety-with-this-glowing-fire-body-scan/">Calm your anxiety with this glowing fire body scan</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/how-cope-panic-and-anxiety/">How to cope with panic and anxiety</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/questionnaire-reflecting-on-feelings-of-anxiety/">Questionnaire: Reflecting on feelings of anxiety</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/tension-release-exercise/">Tension Release Exercise</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/12-instant-stress-busters/">12 instant stress busters</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/worry-rockets/">Worry Rockets</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/breathing-balloon/">Breathing Balloon</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/understanding-your-window-of-tolerance-for-stress/">Understanding your window of tolerance for stress</a></p><h3>Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) – <a href="http://www.camh.ca/">camh.ca</a></h3><p>CAMH is a mental health and addiction teaching and research hospital that provides a wide range of clinical care services for patients of all ages and families.</p><p> <a href="https://youtu.be/qMnQFTy3t30">Mood Matters: How Food, Movement & Sleep Can Have an Impact on You</a></p> <h3>Emotional Well-being Tool Kit<br></h3><p>The <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=4221&language=English">Emotional Well-being Tool Kit</a> serves as a free resource to help you care for your mental health.</p>Anxiety Click on icons to learn about the physical and behavioural symptoms of an anxiety disorder. Then, scroll down for things to try when feeling anxious.Teens
Bulimia nervosaBulimia nervosaBulimia nervosaBEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2023-03-13T04:00:00Z10.100000000000054.1000000000000723.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder where a person overeats and feels out of control, called binge eating, and does things to make up for overeating to prevent weight gain, called purging. Learn about the signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatments.</p><h2>What is bulimia nervosa? </h2><p>Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder where a person struggles with eating a larger amount of food than most people would eat over a short time, once a week or more for at least three months. A person with bulimia nervosa worries about gaining weight, feels shameful about the binge eating and will engage in unhealthy or dangerous purging behaviours (e.g., vomiting, taking pills, dieting to extremes or doing too much exercise) to prevent weight gain.</p><p>People with bulimia nervosa may be thin, average weight, or overweight. In addition to bingeing and purging, someone with bulimia nervosa feels unhappy about their appearance and wants to lose weight. People with bulimia nervosa may not seek help on their own because they may be embarrassed by or ashamed of their eating patterns. However, with treatment, they can often get better.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder where a person has a distorted body image and a fear of gaining weight. </li><li>The disorder involves both binge eating (eating much more than most people would in a short period of time and feeling guilty or ashamed) and purging (self-induced vomiting, taking laxatives, diuretics, weight loss pills, fasting, or exercising) to try to prevent weight gain. </li><li>It is important to see a health-care provider if you experience episodes of binge eating or purging, or you think you might have bulimia nervosa or another eating disorder. </li></ul><h2>What are the signs and symptoms of bulimia nervosa?</h2><p>Bulimia nervosa has a range of signs and symptoms. </p><div class="symptoms-container" id="symp-bulimia"> <a href="#" class="symp-fullscreen"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/B_Landing_screen_mobile.png" alt="" /></a> <a href="#" class="symp-close-full material-icons pull-right">close</a> <div class="instruction-container"><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL</span></div><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL</span></div><div class="anim-instructions"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/SpeechBubbles_Bulimia.png" alt="" /> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Eating quickly or large amounts of food in a short time</span> <p>A person with bulimia may eat faster than expected in an effort to eat a lot of food in a short time.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia01_eatingQuickLarge.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Eating when nobody is around</span> <p>Binge eating has links with guilt and shame. If someone has bulimia, they might eat in the middle of the night or when no one else around and may hide food wrappers around the home.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia06_sneakFood.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Disappearing immediately after a meal</span> <p>Someone with bulimia tends to purge or otherwise compensate for their eating. Purging can include vomiting or taking pills such as laxatives to affect how the body responds to food.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia05_dissapear.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Becoming more irritable</span> <p>Because their brains are starved of nutrients, a person with bulimia might not think clearly. They may become irritable and have emotional outbursts and sudden mood swings.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia02_irritable.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"> <i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button></div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Puffy face</span> <p>Because of their repeated purging, someone with bulimia may develop swollen parotid glands (just in front of their ears). When these glands are swollen, they can make cheeks look puffy.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia03_puffyFace.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Calloused knuckles</span> <p>If someone with bulimia engages in regular purging, their knuckles can get calloused. This is from repeatedly putting their fingers down their throat to induce vomiting. </p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia04_callous.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Dramatic changes in weight</span> <p>Someone with bulimia often has average weight, but this can rise and fall quickly due to bingeing and purging cycles.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia09_dramaticWeightChange.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Broken blood vessels in eyes or face</span> <p>Repeated attempts to vomit puts pressure on the small blood vessels in the face and eyes. When someone retches regularly over a short time, these small blood vessels can start to burst.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia08_brokenVessels.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Dizziness, confusion and weakness</span> <p>Inappropriate intake of nutrition and fluids, along with purging, may interfere with a person’s electrolyte levels and cause them to feel dizzy, confused or weak.<br></p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia07_dizziness.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"> <i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button></div></div><h3 class="main-title">Bulimia <span class="symp-subtitle">Common Signs</span></h3></div><h3>Physical signs of bulimia nervosa</h3><ul><li>can be of any body weight, shape or size </li><li>puffiness of the face, especially around the cheeks</li><li>callouses or marks on the knuckles</li><li>broken blood vessels around the eyes and face</li><li>bad breath because of vomiting</li><li>dizziness</li><li>vomiting blood</li><li>digestive problems</li><li>confusion, weakness or fatigue due changes in important electrolytes such as potassium or sodium</li><li>thinning hair</li><li>tooth decay</li><li>potentially dangerous and sometimes fatal changes in heart rate</li></ul><h3>Behavioural signs of bulimia nervosa</h3><ul><li>hide their binging and purging behaviors </li><li>skipping meals </li><li>weight fluctuations (increases and decreases) because of bingeing and purging </li><li>eating large amounts in a short time </li><li>eating quickly </li><li>hiding food wrappers around the house </li><li>eating in the middle of the night </li><li>disappearing to the bathroom after eating </li><li>not wanting to eat with others </li><li>becoming more irritable or having mood swings and outbursts </li><li>judge themselves based on their body weight </li></ul><h2>What if I think I may have bulimia nervosa? </h2><p> <strong>Tell someone</strong>. Tell a trusted adult such as a parent, caregiver, teacher, coach or therapist. Explain your concerns and ask for their help. </p><p> <strong>Don’t feel alone</strong>. It can be hard to tell someone about your eating disorder thoughts and behaviors. You might be concerned about how they will react. However, it can help to have an open and honest conversation about your eating disorder with those you trust. It will help you feel less alone. </p><p> <strong>Get help early</strong>. It is important for you to see your health-care provider as soon as possible. Your health-care provider can help to determine whether you have an eating disorder and can also assess how serious the situation is. The sooner a diagnosis is made, the quicker you can start treatment, and the better chance for recovery. </p><p>It’s important to see your health-care provider if you: </p><ul><li>are worried you might have bulimia nervosa or another eating disorder </li><li>have out-of-control eating episodes or binges </li><li>are purging by making yourself throw up after you eat or taking pills to alter how food affects your body </li></ul><p>It is especially important to see a health-care provider if you experience pain in your body, especially chest or stomach pain, or you begin to vomit blood. </p><h2>What will a health-care provider do during an assessment for bulimia nervosa? </h2><p>A health-care provider will do a complete history (medical, nutritional and psychosocial history) and a thorough physical examination including: </p><ul><li>measuring your weight and height (plotting measurement on a growth curve) </li><li>taking your lying and standing blood pressure and heart rate </li><li>taking your temperature </li><li>assessing your pubertal growth development </li></ul><p>They may also do some initial tests including blood and urine tests to check if there are abnormalities and an electrocardiogram to check how the heart is functioning. </p><h2>How is bulimia nervosa treated? </h2><p>If the health-care provider determines that a person has bulimia nervosa, they will arrange for appropriate care. Eating disorder care is usually done with multiple health-care professionals including pediatrician or adolescent medicine doctor or family doctor or nurse practitioner, nurses, dietitians, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers who specialize in treating children and teens with eating disorders. </p><p>The health-care provider will decide if the patient can be managed as an outpatient (outside the hospital), either in the health-care provider’s office, or in a specialized eating disorder program. </p><p>The first treatment recommended for young people is an outpatient treatment is called family-based treatment, which focuses on recovery of the eating disorder. Parents/caregivers play an essential role in the treatment and recovery of their child. Family-based treatment includes 3 treatment phases. </p><ul><li>Phase 1 focuses on weight restoration. Parents, supported by the therapist, take responsibility for making sure that the adolescent is eating sufficiently and also takes on all meal planning and preparation. </li><li>Phase 2 is when substantial weight recovery has occurred and the adolescent gradually assumes responsibility for their own eating. </li><li>Phase 3 is when weight is restored and the focus is on general issues of adolescent development. </li></ul><p>If the health-care provider finds that the patient is too sick for outpatient treatment, they may refer the patient for urgent hospitalization. </p><p>The goals of treatment are to: </p><ul><li>ensure that the adolescent is medically safe </li><li>achieve a weight that guarantees healthy growth and development </li><li>stop the cycles of bingeing and purging </li><li>work on having all types of food in moderation, including foods the adolescent may have binged on </li><li>help manage any emotions about eating, including any worries about weight </li></ul><p>If you are experiencing depression or anxiety in addition to bulimia nervosa, your health-care team may suggest other treatments for those mental health disorders once the eating disorder is under control. </p><p>Sometimes your health-care team may also suggest medication. Antidepressants can help with depression or anxiety and can sometimes also help with urges to binge or purge. </p><p>Full recovery from bulimia nervosa is possible. It is important to remember that an early diagnosis and treatment and an early response to treatment may be associated with better outcomes. </p><p>SickKids has an eating disorder program that treats children and teens who are struggling with symptoms of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. For more information on our program visit: <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/adolescent-medicine/">www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/adolescent-medicine/</a></p><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><p> <a href="https://anad.org/">ANAD - National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders</a> (United States) </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Bulimia-Interactive.png Learn about the common behavioural and physical signs and symptoms of bulimia nervosa with this interactive click through. Teens
Mental health, wellbeing and celiac disease: Video resourcesMental health, wellbeing and celiac disease: Video resourcesMental health, wellbeing and celiac disease: Video resourcesMEnglishAdolescent;GastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesAdult (19+) Teen (13-18 years) CaregiversNAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/A%20moment%20of%20peace.jpg2021-04-21T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>This page features videos and animations to help support your mental health and wellbeing while you manage celiac disease. Find resources on mindfulness, for when you need a moment of peace, and coping with pain and other difficult moments.</p><p>Celiac disease is a life-long condition that requires careful management. Coping with management, pain and other factors can impact your mental health and wellbeing. This page has a list of videos that you can watch when you are having trouble coping with pain, are feeling stressed or anxious, or you just need a moment of peace.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Celiac disease is a life-long condition that can impact your mental health and well-being.</li><li>When you are feeling stressed, experiencing pain or just need to breathe, sitting and watching or listening to an animated meditation can help.</li></ul><h2>Mindfulness</h2><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QTsUEOUaWpY?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Everyday mindfulness</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains what everyday mindfulness is, and how being aware of what is going on around you and inside of you can help make life more enjoyable and less stressful.</p></div><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0QXmmP4psbA?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>You are not your thoughts</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains some of the things you can try when you feel overwhelmed by your thoughts. After the video, take a few moments to observe your thoughts with curiosity, paying attention to how each one makes you feel. Paying attention to your thoughts and sorting through them takes practice and patience.</p></div><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cFCiUlFKuO4?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Two wings to fly</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video explains the value of balancing mindfulness and compassion. Use it to help you respond to change and other unwanted experiences. Mindfulness helps you find opportunities to understand your situation more clearly. Compassion helps you respond with kindness and less judgment. After you watch the video, think about how you can practise mindfulness and show compassion towards yourself and others.</p></div><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jaNAwy3XsfI?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"><strong>Being with all of your experiences</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This animation explains why pushing away unwanted thoughts, feelings and sensations can often make a situation worse. Use it when you are finding it hard to focus on the people and things that are important to you, or if you are spending too much energy avoiding your unwanted thoughts or feelings. After the video, take a moment to let all of your thoughts, feelings and sensations be with you, without pushing any of them away.</p></div><h2>Coping with pain and stress</h2><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ty93GRPplJo?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Dealing with difficult moments</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video guides you through an exercise of compassion. Use it when you are finding it hard to show kindness to yourself and others or if you are having trouble getting along with someone in your life.</p></div><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EWzDHN7Jdg8?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Dealing with flares: Controlling the controllables</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This video explains how to recognize what is and what is not in your control and how to accept what you cannot change when living with a chronic physical or mental illness. This will help you to direct your energy towards the things that are important to you instead of trying to control the uncontrollables.</p></div><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nQdM_Cku9pA?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe><span class="vid-title"><strong>A moment of peace</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This video explains how to find some calm and peace in difficult moments. It can help you find a sense of peace when your world seems overwhelming or when things are getting you down. After the video, pause to think about the moments of peace that you can pull from your own experience right now.</p></div>A moment of peace ​Find out how you can find a sense of peace when your world seems overwhelming or when things are getting you down. Teenshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?hub=animations&v=nQdM_Cku9pA&feature=youtu.be#mentalhealth
Physical activity and mental health: OverviewPhysical activity and mental health: OverviewPhysical activity and mental health: OverviewPEnglishPreventionTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Diabetes-How_social_workers_can_help.jpg2019-03-22T04:00:00Z10.100000000000056.8000000000000553.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Regular physical activity has a range of benefits for your physical and mental health. But sometimes it is difficult to know exactly what type of exercise is best and how much activity should be part of your routine every week.</p><h2>How exactly is physical activity good for my health?</h2><h3>Physical health</h3><p>Regular physical activity helps your bones become stronger and builds a healthy heart and stronger muscles. When you exercise, your body releases chemicals called endorphins. These natural painkillers can ease certain types of stomach or back pain as well as improve mood.</p><h3>Brain function</h3><p>Regular <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">moderate-intensity</a> exercise can help improve your focus and memory. Exercise also helps you improve your motor skills (such as hand-eye co-ordination), problem-solving skills and ability to learn new things. Not surprisingly, these all combine to help you do better at school and other activities. </p><h3>Emotional and mental health</h3><p>The endorphins that the brain releases during exercise help to improve your mood, energy levels and even your sleep.</p><p>If you experience a lot of unwanted thoughts, for instance, exercise can help your brain focus on the demands of the physical activity instead. This helps you develop new skills and achieve a sense of accomplishment.</p><p>If you feel sad, a focus, such as a sport, may relieve some of your feelings. Being with others and sharing experiences with them can foster friendships and help you feel less alone. Even working towards common goals, for example as part of a team, can help you develop a sense of achievement, which can improve how you feel. </p><p>Sometimes we get too focused on the way we look. However, regular activity helps us see and appreciate all the amazing things our bodies can do. Over time, we can realize that feeling healthy is an important reason on its own for making sure our body stays strong. </p><h2>I know physical activity is good for me, but I rarely feel like doing it </h2><p>If you have depression or anxiety, or even just an “off” day, exercise may be the last thing on your mind. Remind yourself that you don’t need to be the best or the fastest, but try to do some physical activity because you will likely feel better afterwards. </p><p>Remember, physical activity releases those chemicals called endorphins that will make you feel less anxious and sad and can put you in a good mood. If you’re doing something your own, make a deal with yourself to do just 10 or 15 minutes (if you can) to start off – sometimes when you actually get started you might feel like doing more. Even a short five-minute walk puts you further ahead of the person sitting on the couch. </p><p>If you find it hard to motivate yourself every day, try setting some weekly goals, like “I’m going to do something physical at least once per week.” It’s okay to start low to begin with. Many apps can help you track your activity and some even offer rewards for a certain level of activity each day or week. Other things to keep you motivated include doing an activity with a friend so that it’s harder to skip, trying something new or trying different activities each time to give you some variety.</p><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. Please take 5 minutes to complete our <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey</a>.</p><h3>Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) – <a href="http://www.camh.ca/">camh.ca</a></h3><p>CAMH is a mental health and addiction teaching and research hospital that provides a wide range of clinical care services for patients of all ages and families.</p><p> <a href="https://youtu.be/qMnQFTy3t30">Mood Matters: How Food, Movement & Sleep Can Have an Impact on You</a></p>exercisehttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/physical_activity_mental_health.jpgDiabetes: How social workers can help This video explains how social workers can help when you are diagnosed with diabetes, from emotional support to how to receive tax benefits and care.Teenshttps://youtu.be/bFzS2i1hDEs
What to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentWhat to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentWhat to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentWEnglishAdolescent;DevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)Pelvis;BodyReproductive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>If you’re sexually active, or thinking about becoming sexually active, you should make an appointment with your primary care provider to make sure you’re healthy. Find out what you need to know to prepare for that appointment.</p><h2>Do I need a sexual health appointment?</h2><p>If you’ve had sex or are thinking about having sex in the near future, it’s a good idea to talk to your health-care provider to make sure you’re staying healthy, protected from <a href="/article?contentid=3989&language=english&hub=sexualhealth#adolescenthealth">sexually transmitted infections (STIs)</a>, know how to prevent pregnancy if relevant, and understand the concepts of consent. As you get older you should have regular sexual and reproductive health appointments to make sure you are staying healthy and safe.</p><p>The information on this page will give you an idea of what to expect, including:</p><ul><li>What consent is and why it’s important</li><li>What to expect from the health-care provider during the appointment</li><li>Asking questions during a sexual health appointment<br></li></ul><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4WyWRj0YKiw" frameborder="0"></iframe><br> </div><h2>What is consent?<br></h2><p>In a health-care setting, giving consent means you agree to have a specific procedure, test or treatment done. During a sexual and reproductive health appointment, your health-care provider should ask for your consent before touching or examining any part of your body, including your breasts or genitals. Consent can be given either verbally or in writing.</p><p>If at any point during the appointment you feel uncomfortable, you can withdraw, or take back, your consent. Tell your health-care provider if you do not feel comfortable. Remember, just because you gave your consent at the start of an appointment, that does not mean you have to have any procedure, test or treatment that makes you uncomfortable; you can always change your mind.</p><p>To learn more, read the article <a href="/article?contentid=3993&language=english">Consent and capacity in health care</a>. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If you are sexually active or thinking about having sex, you should consider making an appointment with a health-care provider to make sure you are staying healthy and safe.</li><li>Anything you discuss at your appointment with your provider is confidential unless there are safety concerns. Treatment is also confidential (i.e., contraception and other treatments) and does not require parental consent.</li><li>Your health-care provider should ask for your consent before touching any part of your body. You can always withdraw your consent at any point if you don’t feel comfortable or safe during the appointment.</li><li>The health-care provider will review the 7 Ps with you: Partners, practices, protection from STIs, past history of STIs, prevention of pregnancy, permission (consent), and personal identity (gender identity).</li><li>You will also be able to ask your health-care provider any questions you may have during the appointment.</li></ul><h2>Can I bring my parent/guardian to my sexual and reproductive health appointment?</h2><p>It’s up to you whether you would like your parent/guardian to attend your appointment with you. Some teens may feel more comfortable if their parent/guardian is there, while others might not want their parent/guardian to know they are having this appointment. It is also OK to tell your parent/guardian about your appointment without having them present in the room. </p><p>If you choose not to have your parent/guardian there, your doctor will keep what you tell them, and any treatment you received, confidential (private) unless there are safety concerns. To learn more about confidentiality, take a look at this resource: <a href="/article?contentid=3994&language=english&hub=adulthealthcare#adolescenthealth">What is confidentiality?</a></p><h2>What happens at a sexual and reproductive health appointment?</h2><p>Your health-care provider should review confidentiality and limits with you at the start of your appointment. If they don’t, you can ask them about their policy on confidentiality. For example, they should not discuss your health with anyone else, including your parent/guardian, without your permission/consent.</p><p>Your health-care provider will ask you several questions and may examine you to make sure you are healthy. If you have never had a sexual and reproductive health appointment before, you may feel nervous or unsure about what to expect. It’s important to remember that not all appointments will require an examination. </p><h2>The 7 Ps</h2><p>Your doctor should review the '7 Ps' with you. These include:</p><ul><li>Partners</li><li>Practices</li><li>Protection from STIs</li><li>Past history of STIs</li><li>Prevention of pregnancy</li><li>Permission (consent)</li><li>Personal identity (gender identity)</li></ul><h3>Partners</h3><p>Your health-care provider will ask you if you are currently having sex or if you have ever had sex. They will ask about any sexual partners you have had to assess your risk of STIs. They may ask you how many sexual partners you have had and the length of time you have been having sex with them.</p><h3>Practices</h3><p>Your health-care provider will ask you about the type of sex you’ve had (vaginal, anal, oral etc.). This will help them to determine which tests to perform, if any (e.g., STI testing, pregnancy testing). </p><h3>Protection from STIs</h3><p>Your health-care provider may ask you the following questions: </p><ul><li>Do you use protection against <a href="/article?contentid=3989&language=english&hub=sexualhealth#adolescenthealth">STIs</a> (condoms)?</li><ul><li>If yes, what kind of protection do you use?</li><li>If no, why do you not use protection? </li></ul><li>How often do you use protection?</li><li>In what situations do you use protection?</li></ul><p>Depending on your answers to these questions, your health-care provider may tell you more about safe sex, what types of protection are available to you, and your/your partner’s risk for STIs. </p><p>They may also recommend that you be screened for STIs, even if you do not have symptoms (asymptomatic screening). This usually means you will need to provide a urine sample and have a blood test done. Your health-care provider may also need to do a urethral, cervical, vaginal or anal swab, depending on what they are testing you for. It is sometimes an option to obtain the swab yourself. They should explain each test to you clearly. If you do not understand why you are having a test done, ask your health-care provider to explain or provide more information!</p><h3>Past history of STIs</h3><p>Your health-care provider may ask you the following questions:</p><ul><li>Have you ever been diagnosed with an STI? When? How were you treated?</li><li>Has your partner(s) ever been diagnosed with an STI? Did they receive treatment?</li><li>Have you had any recurring symptoms of STIs or diagnoses of STIs? </li></ul><p>The answers to these questions will also help your health-care provider determine your current risk for STIs but also determine if you need to be tested or treated for STIs.</p><h3>Prevention of pregnancy</h3><p>Depending on your answers to previous questions, your health-care provider may ask you questions such as:</p><ul><li>Are you worried about getting pregnant/getting your partner pregnant?</li><li>Are you using <a href="/article?contentid=3988&language=english&hub=sexualhealth#adolescenthealth">contraception or birth control</a>?</li><li>Do you need information on birth control?</li></ul><h3>Permission (consent)</h3><p>You and your health-care provider should have a conversation about consent and confidentiality, including the age of <a href="/article?contentid=3995&language=english&hub=sexualhealth#adolescenthealth">consent for sexual activity</a> in Canada and what that means.</p><h3>Personal identity (gender)</h3><p>Your health-care provider may ask you questions about your <a href="/article?contentid=3953&language=english&hub=gender#adolescenthealth">sexual orientation and gender identity</a>. They should not make any assumptions about identity, attraction or sexual behaviour, and they should not pass judgement on how you answer.</p><h2>Can I ask questions during a sexual health appointment?</h2><p>You will have the chance to ask your health-care provider about any concerns you may have. You may feel nervous or embarrassed to ask but remember, it is your health care provider’s job to answer your health questions and make sure you’re healthy and being responsible! The information you share, including questions and concerns, is confidential.</p><p>If you do not feel comfortable with your health-care provider or if you feel judged by them, you can call a local health clinic or health services hotline to ask for a referral. The most important thing is that you feel comfortable with your health-care provider and that you trust them.</p><p>To find a sexual health clinic near you, visit: <a href="https://www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services">www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services</a><br></p><p>Relevant laws for Ontario can be found at: <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/">www.ontario.ca</a>:<br></p><ul><li> <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/96h02">Healthcare Consent Act (1996)</a><br></li><li> <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/90m07">Mental Health Act (1990)</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/04p03">Personal Health Information Protection Act (2004)</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/92s30">Substitute Decisions Act (1992)</a></li><li> <a href="https://www.ontario.ca/laws/statute/17c14">Child, Youth, Family Services Act</a></li></ul><p>N Johnson; Canadian Paediatric Society, Adolescent Health Committee. Comprehensive sexual health assessments for adolescents. <em>Paediatr Child Health</em>. 2020; 25(8):551. (Abstract). <a href="https://cps.ca/documents/position/comprehensive-sexual-health-assessments-for-adolescents">https://cps.ca/documents/position/comprehensive-sexual-health-assessments-for-adolescents</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1463773444.jpgWhat to expect at a sexual health appointment ​If you’re sexually active, or thinking about it, find out what you need to know to prepare for an appointment with your primary care provider. Teenshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WyWRj0YKiw