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Managing sickle cell painManaging sickle cell painManaging sickle cell painMEnglishHaematologyTeen (13-18 years)NACardiovascular system;Arteries;Veins;CapillariesConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)Fatigue;Joint or muscle pain;Pain2023-09-25T04:00:00Z10.000000000000049.5000000000000586.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about the 3P approach to pain management, which is a combination of psychological, physical and pharmacological (medications) strategies.</p><p>Pain is much like hunger and thirst—it requires you to do something to get some relief.</p><p>Even if you cannot remove your pain, you can reduce it by changing the pain signals that reach your brain. The most effective way to change your pain signals is through the "3P approach" to pain management.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The most effective way to manage pain is with a combination of psychological, physical and pharmacological methods. This is called the "3P approach".</li><li>Psychological strategies may include managing stress, practising mindfulness and learning to think differently about pain.</li><li>Physical strategies include exercising and finding comfort positions.</li><li>Pharmacological strategies are medications. These may be a combination of pain medications and other types of medications to manage sickle cell symptoms.</li></ul><h2>3P approach to pain management</h2><p>Pain is best treated with:</p><ul><li> <a href="#psych">psychological strategies, or methods</a></li><li> <a href="#physical">physical strategies</a></li><li> <a href="#pharma">pharmacological strategies</a></li></ul><p>Together, these form the 3P approach to pain management. Check out this animation to learn more!<br></p><div class="asset-animation"> <iframe src="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/AKH/animations/3Ps_chronic_pain_management_SCD/3Ps_chronic_pain_management_SCD_EN.aspx"></iframe><br></div><h2 id="psych">Psychological strategies</h2> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iCanCopeSCD/INM_ICCP_3Ps_psychological_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Psychological strategies include learning how to manage stress, practise mindfulness, relax tense muscles and think differently about pain. All these strategies can help people reduce pain. Your goal is to find the strategies that will help you manage your pain in healthy ways and let you do the things you enjoy.</p><p>A number of psychological strategies are based on the principles of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).</p><h3>Cognitive behavioural therapy</h3><p>Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a form of psychological treatment. Its name comes from its focus on the role of thoughts (the cognitive part) and behaviours in how we feel and what we do.</p><p>The image below shows how what you think, what you do and how you feel are all related to each other.</p> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iCanCopeSCD/what_is_CBT_SCD_J4T_EN.png" alt="" /> </figure> <p>CBT has been used for over 30 years with teens dealing with many different pain conditions. It can alter pain signals and change how someone perceives pain. It is one of the best methods for reducing pain and helping people get back to doing their everyday activities.</p><p>Cognitive strategies are ways to help with your thinking. They include:</p><ul><li>skills to manage stress</li><li>skills to improve communication and relationships</li><li>thinking in new ways (sometimes called cognitive coping skills)</li></ul><p>Behavioural strategies are related to your actions. They include:</p><ul><li>deep breathing and relaxation</li><li>strategies to manage sleep problems</li><li>strategies to increase physical activity</li></ul><p>You will learn more about different psychological strategies to help manage your pain throughout the skills modules.</p><h2 id="physical">Physical strategies</h2> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iCanCopeSCD/INM_ICCP_3Ps_physical_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>Physical strategies include finding positions of comfort and exercising. Learning how to get active in the right way can improve blood flow and even train your pain system to be less sensitive. Leading a more active life can improve your mood, sleep and energy level as well as reduce your pain. It also improves your physical function and overall well-being.</p><p>You will learn more on physical strategies in the <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=2160&language=english">module on keeping a healthy lifestyle</a>.</p><h2 id="pharma">Pharmacological strategies</h2> <figure class="asset-c-100"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iCanCopeSCD/INM_ICCP_3Ps_pharmacological_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <p>'Pharmacological strategies' is another name for medications. These can also be helpful when you use them with physical and psychological strategies.</p><p>Pain medications are designed to reduce pain signals at specific points in the pain pathway. Your health-care provider may recommend other medications or treatments to help manage other sickle cell disease symptoms, improve your sleep, reduce anxiety and help you manage your mood.</p><p>You can find more information on pharmacological strategies in the <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=2191&language=english">treatment and medications section</a> in the About sickle cell disease tab.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iCanCopeSCD/managing_pain_Copey_J4T.pngTeens
What causes cancer?What causes cancer?What causes cancer?WEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNAConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z6.2000000000000071.8000000000000537.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about possible causes of cancer and the role of genetics in a cancer diagnosis.</p><h2>What causes cancer?</h2><p>Scientists are researching the answer to what causes cancer. For most cancers though, especially cancers in young people, it’s still not known what causes them. We do know that cancer is not contagious. This means that cancer does not spread from one person to the next – you cannot "catch" cancer.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>The cause of most cancers is unknown.</li><li>In rare cases, cancer is caused by a mutation in the genes of DNA passed on through family, but this does not guarantee you or anyone else in your family will have cancer.</li><li>For most teenagers, cancer happens by chance and not as a result of any one thing.</li></ul><h2>Genetics</h2><p>Having cancer yourself does not mean that your siblings, friends or parents will get cancer. Very rarely, cancer can be caused by a mutation in the genes of your DNA that is passed on through your family. A person with this mutated gene does not automatically get cancer, but the risk of developing cancer increases.</p><h2>Why did I get cancer?</h2><p>Scientists do not know what causes cancer in young people and your health-care team may not know what caused your cancer. </p><p>Many teens with cancer wonder "Why me?" You might wonder whether you did something that caused your cancer or that made you deserve cancer. The answer to both of these questions is NO. Having cancer is not your fault. You did not cause your cancer and you did not do anything to deserve it. Unfortunately, almost all of the time in teenagers, cancer just happens. Getting cancer happens entirely by chance.</p><p>You also did not catch cancer from anyone or anywhere else in the way you might catch a cold. <br></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/What_causes_cancer-Teen.jpg ​Scientists are researching the answer to what causes cancer. Learn about possible causes of cancer and the role of genetics in a cancer diagnosis. Teens
Bipolar disorder: OverviewBipolar disorder: OverviewBipolar disorder: OverviewBEnglishAdolescent;PsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-12-02T05:00:00Z7.2000000000000069.70000000000001053.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder. Find out about the types of bipolar disorder, the symptoms and how it is diagnosed.</p><h2>What is bipolar disorder?</h2><p>Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder that includes episodes of:</p><ul><li>unusually high, hyperactive or irritable mood (called manic or hypomanic episodes)</li><li>low mood (depressive episodes)</li></ul><p>Bipolar disorder is not usually diagnosed until a person has experienced a manic or hypomanic episode. A manic episode lasts for at least seven days. A hypomanic episode is less intense and shorter than a manic episode and lasts for at least four days. Symptoms of hypomania are also less severe than symptoms of mania. </p><h2>How is bipolar disorder different from everyday mood swings?</h2><p>Every youth experiences changes in their mood as a result of stressors (something that causes stress) or big life changes. What makes bipolar disorder different is that each mood change lasts longer (from days to months) and interferes with day-to-day functioning.</p><h2>What are the main symptoms of bipolar disorder?</h2><p>In addition to changes in mood, the manic and depressive episodes linked with bipolar disorder have many different symptoms. This may include symptoms of psychosis in some youth. The main symptoms of bipolar disorder involve episodes of depression and mania, and, sometimes, symptoms of psychosis.</p><h3>Symptoms of depression</h3><p>Depression has a range of emotional, cognitive, behavioural and physical symptoms. These include low mood, feelings of hopelessness, negative thoughts, loss of interest in enjoyable activities, and changes in sleep patterns.</p><h3>Symptoms of mania and hypomania</h3><p>Much like the symptoms of depression, the symptoms of mania and hypomania fall into the following categories:</p><ul><li>emotional (feelings)</li><li>cognitive (thoughts, brain function)</li><li>behavioural (actions)</li><li>physical (how your body feels)</li></ul><h3>Emotional symptoms</h3><p>During an episode of mania or hypomania, you may feel:</p><ul><li>elevated, euphoric (intense excitement or happiness) or irritable</li><li>grand or on top of the world</li></ul><h3>Cognitive symptoms</h3><p>Someone experiencing mania or hypomania may:</p><ul><li>have inflated self-esteem or grandiosity</li><li>suffer reduced concentration</li><li>have racing thoughts</li></ul><h3>Behavioural symptoms</h3><p>An episode of mania or hypomania can often involve:</p><ul><li>starting many different activities or projects</li><li>engaging in risky behaviour such as increased spending, <a href="/article?contentid=3841&language=english&hub=mentalhealthAZ#mentalhealth">substance use</a>, or risky sexual activity</li><li>talking more than usual and more quickly than usual, sometimes not allowing interruptions</li><li>jumping from one topic to another when speaking</li></ul><h3>Physical symptoms</h3><p>During an episode of mania or hypomania, you may experience:</p><ul><li>high energy levels</li><li>agitation</li><li>a decreased need for sleep, sleeping much less than usual without feeling tired</li></ul><h3>Symptoms of psychosis</h3><p>When someone experiences psychosis, they may develop beliefs that are not based on reality.</p><ul><li>During an episode of mania, their beliefs are typically positive, for example, a person might think they are better than others.</li><li>During depressive episodes, the beliefs are typically negative, for example, a person might believe they are responsible for catastrophic events.</li></ul><p>Someone experiencing psychosis may also sense things that do not really exist, for example, hearing voices or seeing things that others do not. They may also speak in a way that is difficult or impossible to follow, or develop new behaviours that seem bizarre.</p><h2>Types of bipolar disorder</h2><p>Not everyone experiences bipolar disorder in the same way. Bipolar disorder exists on a spectrum that includes:</p><ul><li>bipolar disorder, type 1</li><li>bipolar disorder, type 2</li><li>other bipolar disorders</li></ul><h3>Bipolar disorder, type 1</h3><p>Bipolar disorder, type 1, is diagnosed when a youth has had at least one episode of mania. This means that they have had specific symptoms that last for at least one week, which significantly impair their everyday functioning. Bipolar disorder, type 1, can be diagnosed when symptoms last for less than one week if the youth needs to be admitted to hospital.</p><p>Youth with bipolar disorder often also experience depressive episodes. But even if they have one or more episodes of depression, they can only be diagnosed accurately with bipolar disorder, type 1, once they have an episode of mania.</p><h3>Bipolar disorder, type 2</h3><p>Bipolar disorder, type 2, is diagnosed after a youth has had at least one episode of hypomania and at least one major depressive episode. This means that they have had a number of specific symptoms over at least four days. Symptoms of hypomania impair a youth's everyday functioning but not to the same degree as mania.</p><p>Youth with hypomania do not need to be admitted to hospital, and there are no associated symptoms of psychosis. </p><h3>Other bipolar disorders</h3><p>A health-care professional may diagnose another type of bipolar disorder if a youth has major symptoms of bipolar disorder but does not meet all the criteria for bipolar disorder, type 1 or 2.</p><h2>What causes bipolar disorder?</h2><p>There is no single known cause of bipolar disorder but rather a number of possible factors. For example, children who have a parent or sibling with bipolar disorder are more likely to develop the disorder themselves.</p><p>The risk of bipolar disorder may be higher as a result of various stressors in a youth's environment. These stressors might include the loss of a parent or caregiver, school difficulties, bullying, poverty or early life abuse or neglect. Some substances, such as cannabis, also increase the risk of developing bipolar disorder.</p><h2>How common is bipolar disorder in teens?</h2><p>Bipolar disorders affect between 1 and 3 per cent of teens. </p><h2>Does bipolar disorder occur with other conditions?</h2><p>Bipolar disorder often occurs with other conditions, especially <a href="/article?contentid=3810&language=english&hub=mentalhealthAZ#mentalhealth">anxiety disorders</a>. Other conditions that commonly occur with bipolar disorder include:</p><ul><li>substance use disorders</li><li>attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)</li><li>disruptive disorders such as oppositional defiant disorder.</li></ul><h2>How bipolar disorder is diagnosed</h2><p>Your doctor will assess:</p><ul><li>your concerns and the symptoms that are interfering with your functioning</li><li>current stressors in your life</li><li>medications that you take</li><li>substances that you use</li><li>your development (from pregnancy onwards)</li><li>your family's mental health history</li><li>family stressors</li></ul><p>If you have experienced significant symptoms of mania or hypomania, you may meet the criteria for bipolar disorder.</p><p>Your doctor may also want to do other tests to check for possible general medical or neurological causes of your symptoms.</p><p>If you are diagnosed with bipolar disorder, your doctor will discuss the <a href="/article?contentid=3845&language=english&hub=mentalhealthAZ#mentalhealth">most appropriate treatment options</a> with you. You may want input from other members of your family or your school.</p><p>Your doctor may suggest that you see a therapist or a psychiatrist. They may also recommend medications or lifestyle changes. Most people need medications to properly treat bipolar disorder.</p><h2>When to see a doctor about bipolar disorder</h2><p>See your doctor if you have concerns about hypomania or mania.</p><p>Go to your nearest emergency department if there are concerns about safety (such as suicidal thoughts or behaviours), aggressive thoughts or behaviours, risk-taking behaviours or psychosis.</p><h3>Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) – <a href="http://www.camh.ca/">camh.ca</a></h3><p>CAMH is a mental health and addiction teaching and research hospital that provides a wide range of clinical care services for patients of all ages and families.</p><p> <a href="https://youtu.be/qMnQFTy3t30">Mood Matters: How Food, Movement & Sleep Can Have an Impact on You</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ID3844%20BiP%20Dis%20Overview.jpgTeens
Gender and identityGender and identityGender and identityGEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-18 years)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Resources to answer questions you may have on sex, gender and sexual orientation as well as how to find support and resources when you need them. </p><p>Resources to answer questions you may have on sex, gender and sexual orientation as well as how to find support and resources when you need them. </p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Gender and identity</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p> Read about sex, gender and sexual orientation to better understand the complete story of who you are on the inside and how you want to present to the world.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3953&language=English">Gender identity and sexual orientation: An Overview</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3961&language=English">Questioning your gender and identifying as transgender</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3962&language=English">Transitioning</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3963&language=English">Using gender-inclusive language</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3964&language=English">Gender and identity: Support and resources</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3976&language=English">Sharing personal information, coming out and being outed</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3977&language=English">The right to safe spaces</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3978&language=English">Finding a primary health-care provider</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Additional resources</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The following resources from Holland Bloorview offer information about sexuality and disability.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/disability-sexuality-resource-hub">Disability and Sexuality Resource Hub</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/disability-sexuality-resource-hub/sexuality-guides">“Becoming You: Exploring sexuality and disability for pre-teens” book</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/gender%20transitioning_ContentID3962.jpggender Discover resources to answer questions you may have on sex, gender and sexual orientation, as well as how to find support and resources. Teens
Recognizing stress and anxietyRecognizing stress and anxietyRecognizing stress and anxietyREnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)NANANAPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z6.1000000000000076.3000000000000610.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn about how stress works, how you can recognize when you are feeling stress, and the signs of body and mind stress.</p><p>Now that you have thought about some of the things that cause you stress, it is important to learn more about how stress works so you can recognize it. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Stress triggers a 'fight or flight' response in your body, and when this goes on for too long your muscles become tense, your heart rate increases and you may start to feel sick or tired.</li><li>Stress looks different for everyone, so it is important to spend time figuring out how you react to stress, both physically and emotionally.</li><li>Physical signs of stress include cold or sweaty hands, change in appetite, upset stomach and a racing heartbeat.</li><li>Signs of mind stress include feeling easily irritated, nervous, worried or overwhelmed.</li></ul><h2>How does stress work?</h2><p>When you are under stress, your muscles get a big dose of energy called adrenaline. This energy prepares you to fight back or run (often called the ‘fight or flight’ response). In other words, stress makes you more alert and ready to act. But if you have too much stress or if it goes on for a long time, your muscles can become tense, your heart beats faster and your body may start feeling sick or tired. As a result, stress can actually make your cancer symptoms and treatment side effects such as <a href="/Article?contentid=3518&language=English">pain</a>, <a href="/Article?contentid=3515&language=English">fatigue</a> or <a href="/Article?contentid=3517&language=English">nausea</a> feel worse. </p><h2>How can I recognize when I am feeling stress?</h2><p>Stress looks and feels different for different people. Something that is stressful to you may not be stressful to someone else. Many young people don’t realize when they are experiencing stress. You may need to spend some time figuring out how your body and your mind react to stress. </p><h2>Signs of body stress</h2><p>When we are stressed or anxious, our bodies will start to show physical signs of tension. Here are some common signs of body stress. Check which ones you might have felt and think about anything else you may experience when you are stressed. </p><ul><li>Cold or sweaty hands and skin </li><li>Change in appetite – eating too much or not enough</li><li>Upset stomach (butterflies in stomach) or headaches</li><li>Fast, irregular or racing heartbeat </li><li>Feeling fidgety or biting your nails</li><li>Fast and shallow breathing </li><li>Tight muscles that cannot relax in your face, neck or back </li><li>Trouble falling asleep or staying asleep </li><li>Low energy or feeling tired for no obvious reason </li></ul><h2>Signs of mind stress</h2><p>Sometimes a bad feeling, anger, nervousness or sadness can be a clue that you are stressed or anxious. You may have difficulty concentrating or feel like you can’t stop worrying about something. You might feel really hopeless. These are signs of mind stress. </p><p>Here is a list of feelings you may have when you feel stressed. </p><p>Check which ones you may have felt. Think about any other feelings you have when you are stressed.</p><ul><li>Easily irritated or feeling on edge </li><li>Nervous, jumpy or restless </li><li>Worried </li><li>Racing thoughts or constant thoughts about certain things </li><li>Feeling overwhelmed </li><li>Feeling out of control </li><li>Feeling sad or depressed </li><li>Finding it difficult to concentrate or make decisions </li><li>Wanting to escape or run away </li></ul><h2>Stress and bad feelings: a negative cycle</h2><p>Stress can have a negative effect on your thoughts and emotions. In turn, unhelpful thoughts and emotions can also cause you to worry and feel more anxious. Eventually, the stress, emotions and anxiety cause tension in your body.</p><p>Feeling tense in your body makes stress seem bigger and even more overwhelming. It’s like a negative cycle – stress can lead to bad feelings that make us more anxious and tense and these make us even more stressed. We can reduce stress by breaking this cycle at any point! </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Recognizing_stress_and_anxiety.jpgTeens
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)SEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)Body;PelvisNAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000063.40000000000001213.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Sexually transmitted infections are disease that are spread through sexual contact. Learn about the different types of STIs including signs, symptoms, testing and treatment, as well as how to prevent an STI. </p><h2>What is a sexually transmitted infection (STI)?</h2><p>Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diseases that can spread from person to person through any sexual contact. Many STIs don’t have any obvious signs or symptoms at first. This is why it’s so important that you protect yourself and your partner(s) by using protection and getting tested regularly.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are spread from person to person through sexual contact.</li><li>You can prevent STIs by using protection such as condoms, discussing STIs and safe sex with your partner(s), asking your health-care provider about vaccines, and getting regularly tested.</li><li>If you have an STI, do not have sex until the infection is gone, and your health-care provider says that it is OK. </li><li>If you think you have an STI, make an appointment with a health-care provider right away so you can be tested and start treatment.</li></ul><h2>How can I prevent STIs?</h2><p>The best ways to prevent an STI are:</p><ul><li>Use <a href="/article?contentid=3988&language=english">protection such as condoms</a></li><li>Discuss STIs and safe sex with your partner(s) so that you can protect each other</li><li>Ask your health-care provider about getting vaccinated against hepatitis B and human papillomavirus (HPV)</li><li>Get tested regularly for STIs</li></ul><div class="caution"><p>If you have an STI, don’t have sex until the infection is gone, and your health-care provider says it’s OK. If the STI has no cure (such as herpes or HIV) make sure you always use protection.</p></div><h2>What do I do if I think I have an STI?</h2><p>If you think you might have an STI, contact your health-care provider. Or to find a sexual health clinic near you, visit the <a href="https://www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services">Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights website</a>.</p><h2>What are the different types of STIs? </h2><ul><li><a href="#topic1">Chlamydia</a></li><a href="#topic1"> </a><li><a href="#topic1"> </a><a href="#topic2">Gonorrhea</a></li><li> <a href="#topic3">Syphilis</a></li><li> <a href="#topic4">HPV</a></li><li> <a href="#topic5">Trichomoniasis</a></li><li> <a href="#topic6">Hepatitis B</a></li><li> <a href="#topic7">Hepatitis C</a></li><li> <a href="#topic8">Herpes</a></li><li> <a href="#topic9">Pubic lice</a></li><li> <a href="#topic10">Scabies</a></li><li> <a href="#topic11">HIV</a></li></ul><h3 id="topic1">Chlamydia</h3><p>Chlamydia affects the cervix and urethra, and sometimes the rectum, throat and eyes. It is the most common bacterial STI and is more common in female-bodied people than male-bodied people.</p><p>Most people with chlamydia have no symptoms at all. Signs and symptoms of chlamydia may include:</p><ul><li>Discharge from penis or vagina</li><li>Vaginal bleeding after sex or between periods</li><li>Pain in the abdomen or lower back</li><li>Pain during sex</li><li>Itchy urethra<br></li><li>Pain or swelling in testicles</li><li>Pain or burning while urinating (peeing)</li></ul><p>Chlamydia is diagnosed through:</p><ul><li>Urine sample OR</li><li>Swab of cervix, urethra, vagina, rectum, nose, throat and/or eyes.</li></ul><p>Treatment for chlamydia is antibiotic pills.</p><p>You should be retested for chlamydia 6 months after treatment.</p><h3 id="topic2">Gonorrhea </h3><p>Gonorrhea affects the cervix and urethra, and sometimes the rectum and throat. It is the second most common bacterial STI. You might sometimes hear it called 'the clap'.<br></p><p>Signs and symptoms of gonorrhea may include:</p><ul><li>Discharge from penis or vagina</li><li>Pain during sex</li><li>Pain in lower abdomen or pelvis</li><li>Vaginal bleeding after sex or between periods</li><li>Irregular periods</li><li>Pain or swelling in testicles</li><li>Pain or burning while urinating</li><li>May have no symptoms</li></ul><p>Gonorrhea is diagnosed through:</p><ul><li>Urine sample OR</li><li>Swab of the infected area (penis, vagina, cervix, anus, throat, and/or eye)</li></ul><p>Gonnorhea is treated with antibiotic pills and muscular injection.</p><p>You may be instructed by your health-care provider to be retested 2 to 3 weeks after treatment to ensure the infection is gone. Anyone who has been treated for gonorrhea should be retested 6 months after treatment.</p><h3 id="topic3">Syphilis</h3><p>Syphilis is caused by bacteria. Rates of cases have been increasing in Canada.</p><p>Syphilis has 4 stages of symptoms: </p><ul><li>Primary – a painless sore at the affected area.</li><li>Secondary – flu-like symptoms and rash developing 3 weeks to 6 months after infection.</li><li>Latent – syphilis is untreated, and generally has no symptoms; this phase can continue for years.</li><li>Tertiary – 10-30 years after infection; damage to organs.</li></ul><p>Syphilis is diagnosed through:</p><ul><li>Swab of affected area (primary syphilis only).</li><li>Blood test.</li></ul><p>Syphilis is treated with penicillin, or other antibiotics. Early treatment is important as damage caused by syphilis can’t be reversed.</p><h3 id="topic4">HPV and genital warts </h3><p>Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common STI. The highest rates of HPV are in teens and young adults aged 15-24 years old.</p><p>Some types of HPV can cause genital warts and others can cause cancer if left untreated.</p><p>A vaccine is available to prevent HPV.</p><p>Some people may not have any signs or symptoms at all, while others might have the following:</p><ul><li>Warts that look like tiny bumps on the vagina, anus, cervix or inside of the thigh; may be small or hard to see.</li><li>Pain or bleeding.</li></ul><p>HPV is diagnosed through:</p><ul><li>Visual exam.</li><li>Pap test (only for those age 25 or older).</li></ul><p>Treatment for HPV includes watching the warts to see if they go away or wart removal by a health-care professional <strong>(never use over-the-counter wart medicine on genital warts unless prescribed by a health-care professional)</strong>.</p><h3 id="topic5">Trichomoniasis </h3><p>Trichomoniasis is a common infection affecting the vulva, vagina, cervix, urethra, bladder, and penis.</p><p>Signs and symptoms of trichomoniasis may include: </p><ul><li>Discharge or odor from the vagina or penis.</li><li>Pain or burning while peeing.</li><li>Pain during sex.</li><li>Itchiness.</li></ul><p>It's diagnosed through a swab of the affected area.</p><p>Antibiotics is the main treatment for trichomoniasis.</p><h3 id="topic6">Hepatitis B </h3><p>Hepatitis B is a virus that affects the liver.</p><p>A vaccine is available to prevent Hepatitis B.</p><p>Most people do not have signs of hepatitis B. Up to 8 weeks after exposure, you may have flu-like symptoms.</p><p>Hepatitis B is diagnosed with a blood test.</p><p>There is no cure for hepatitis B, but most people recover and have no symptoms after 6 months.</p><h3 id="topic7">Hepatitis C </h3><p>Hepatitis C is a virus that affects the liver.</p><p>Acute symptoms of hepatitis C may include:</p><ul><li>Flu-like symptoms</li><li>Decreased appetite, weight loss</li><li>Jaundice</li><li>Rash</li><li>Dark urine or clay-coloured stool</li></ul><p>Chronic symptoms of hepatitis C may include: </p><ul><li>Jaundice</li><li>Swelling of the abdomen (belly)</li><li>Blood in stool (poo) and vomit</li><li>Interrupted sleep</li><li>Depression</li><li>Weight loss</li><li>Itchy skin</li><li>Brain disease</li></ul><p>Hepatitis C is diagnosed with a blood test.</p><p>A combination of medications are used to treat the hepatitis C infection.Treatment also includes preventing liver damage.</p><h3 id="topic8">Herpes </h3><p>There are 2 types of herpes:</p><ul><li>HSV-1 more commonly causes oral infection (cold sores, fever blisters around the mouth)</li><li>HSV-2 more commonly causes genital herpes with lesions/sores around the vulva, vagina, cervix, anus and penis</li></ul><p>Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 can infect both the mouth and the genitals. They can both be spread by kissing, touching, oral sex, unprotected vaginal or anal sex.</p><p>Symptoms of a first infection may include:</p><ul><li>Flu-like symptoms</li><li>Cold sore or fever blister around the nose, lips or in the mouth</li><li>Pain while peeing</li><li>Genital pain</li><li>Genital blisters</li><li>Genital ulcers</li></ul><p>Symptos of a recurrent infection (an infection that comes back) include:</p><ul><li>Tingling, itching or burning</li><li>Sores inside the mouth or on the lips, vulva, vagina, or penis</li></ul><p>Herpes is diagnosed through a swab of a lesion/sore.</p><p>Medication is used to decrease the length and severity of a herpes outbreak. There is no cure for herpes.</p><h3 id="topic9">Pubic lice </h3><p>Pubic lice are small insects that nest in pubic hair. They're sometimes called 'crabs' because of their appearance.</p><p>Can also be found in the eyebrows, armpit hair, beards and mustaches.</p><p>The main signs and symptoms of pubic lice are itching, redness or irritation at the affected area.</p><p>They're diagnosed through a physical exam of the infected area by a health-care professional.</p><p>Pubic lice are treated with medicated creams, lotions, or shampoos to apply to the affected area.</p><h3 id="topic10">Scabies </h3><p>Scabies are mites that burrow under the skin to lay eggs.</p><p>Signs and symptoms of scabies may include:</p><p>Rash or bumps, particularly in a line.</p><p>Itching.</p><p>Scabies is diagnosed through:</p><ul><li>Physical exam of the infected area by a health-care professional.</li><li>Scraping of the rash to look for mites, fecal matter of mites, or mite eggs under a microscope.</li></ul><p>Scabies are treated with scabicide creams or lotions to apply to the affected area.</p><h3 id="topic11">HIV </h3><p>Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus that attacks the immune system. In some cases it can develop into AIDS.</p><p>Signs and symptoms of HIV may include:</p><ul><li>Mild flu-like symptoms that develop 2-4 weeks after exposure then disappear.</li></ul><p>After several years (usually after at least 10 years), symptoms can include:</p><ul><li>Flu-like symptoms </li><li>Enlarged lymph nodes </li><li>Shortness of breath or dry cough </li><li>Vision loss</li><li>Lesions on skin </li><li>Anemia </li><li>Severe shingles or oral or genital ulcers </li></ul><p>In rare cases, some people do not have any symptoms (chronic asymptomatic HIV).</p><p>HIV is diagnosed through blood work.</p><p>Antiretroviral therapy is used to slow the progression of HIV.</p><p> <a href="https://www.sexandu.ca/stis/">Sex & U</a></p><p> <a href="https://youngwomenshealth.org/sexual-health-index/">Center for Young Women's Health</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/AKH%20Social%20Media/Sexually%20Transmitted%20Infections_Teens.jpg ​Learn about the different types of sexually transmitted infections including signs, symptoms, testing and treatment, as well as how to prevent them. Teens
How to take care of your teethHow to take care of your teethHow to take care of your teethHEnglishDentalTeen (13-18 years)TeethMouthNon-drug treatmentTeen (13-18 years)NA2023-11-20T05:00:00Z5.8000000000000077.0000000000000451.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to properly take care of your teeth at home, why it’s so important, and how often you really need to go to the dentist.</p><h2>Why is toothbrushing important?</h2><p>Brushing your teeth helps to remove plaque, which is the breakdown of food that coats your teeth. Brushing every day to remove plaque helps to prevent cavities and gum disease.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Brush your teeth twice a day, for two minutes each time.</li><li>Floss once a day.</li><li>Visit your dentist regularly to keep your teeth and gums healthy and help prevent cavities and gum disease.</li></ul><h2>How to brush your teeth</h2><p>Follow these steps to brush your teeth properly:</p><ol><li>Gently brush the outer surface of your teeth, tooth by tooth.</li><li>At a 45-degree angle, brush against the gumline to get rid of plaque and food bits that may be trapped there.</li><li>Gently brush the inner surface of your teeth, tooth by tooth.</li><li>Clean the chewing surface of your teeth.</li><li>Brush your tongue to remove bacteria that can cause bad breath.</li></ol><p> <strong>Remember:</strong> You should be brushing your teeth for two minutes, twice a day. <br> Change your toothbrush at least every 3 months, or sooner if you have been sick.</p><h2>Flossing</h2><p>You also need to floss once per day. It doesn’t matter if you do this in the morning or at night. Flossing can help to prevent cavities, bad breath and gum disease. You might bleed and have some pain for the first few days if you haven’t flossed in a while, but this will go away with regular flossing.</p><h3>How to floss your teeth</h3><ol><li>Take a piece of floss about as long as your forearm.</li><li>Wrap it around your middle fingers, leaving a two-inch gap between your hands.</li><li>With your index fingers, slide the floss between the teeth and wrap it into a ‘C’ shape.</li><li>Wipe the tooth from the gum to the tip at least two or three times.</li><li>Use a new part of the floss for each tooth.</li></ol><p>Floss both sides of each tooth and remember the backs of the last molars. Instead of standard floss, you can also use other flossing tools such as flossers/floss picks and water picks.</p><h2>Other dental care tips</h2><ul><li>You can use a manual or electric toothbrush. Electric toothbrushes usually have a built in two-minute timer.</li><li>There are several different types of toothpastes you can use depending on your concerns (cavities, whitening, sensitivity). If you’re not sure what to use, talk to your dentist or hygienist.</li><li>Make regular appointments with your dentist. They can help to remove plaque build-up and identify other problems like cavities or gum disease.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/How_to_take_care_of_your_teeth.jpgTeens

 

 

HemophiliaHemophiliaHemophiliaHEnglishHaematologyTeen (13-18 years);Child (0-12 years)NAArteries;VeinsConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn how you can be more proactive about your own care. Learn about how hemophilia is treated, how to manage bleeds and transitioning to adult care.</p><p>Learn how you can be more proactive about your own care. Learn about how hemophilia is treated, how to manage bleeds and transitioning to adult care.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Introduction</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>When you switch from a paediatric care to an adult care you will need to be more proactive about your care. Find information so that you can develop the self-management tools you need to take more responsibility over your hemophilia and make this transition easier for you.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3210&language=English">The impact of transition</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3211&language=English">Hemophilia and setting goals</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3257&language=English">Hemophilia and finding quality information</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3258&language=English">Hemophilia glossary</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">The basics of hemophilia</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn the basics of hemophilia including what it is, what causes it and how is it diagnosed. Also find information about the roles of different blood vessels in your body and what happens during a bleed. </p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3212&language=English">Understanding blood clotting</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3213&language=English">What causes hemophilia?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3214&language=English">Diagnosing hemophilia</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3215&language=English">What happens during a bleed?</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Hemophilia management</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Hemophilia treatment involves replacing the missing factor using injections. This way, you are supplying your blood with the factor it needs to form a blood clot and stop the bleed. Taking your factor as prescribed is a huge part of taking more responsibility in your hemophilia self-care. Learn how hemophilia therapy both treats and prevents bleeds and also find practical tips on infusing at home.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3216&language=English">Hemophilia management: A brief history</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Treating hemophilia</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3217&language=English">Treating hemophilia</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3218&language=English">Understanding prophylaxis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3219&language=English">Hemophilia and factor replacement therapy</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Hemophilia at home</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3220&language=English">Self-infusion</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3222&language=English">Hemophilia home therapy: Practical tips</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Managing bleeds</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>It is important to recognize bleeding as early as possible and treat it right away. Learn how to recognize bleeds and find information about the different types of bleeds and what happens when you have a bleed. Find information about accessing emergency care, how to care for a bleed and how to manage pain.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3223&language=English">Recognizing bleeds</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Types of bleeds</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3224&language=English">Types of bleeds</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3225&language=English">Bleeds to watch out for</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3226&language=English">Life-threatening bleeds</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3227&language=English">Accessing emergency care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3228&language=English">Supportive care for hemophilia: Using R.I.I.C.E.</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Managing pain</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3229&language=English">Managing pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3230&language=English">Medicines for pain</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3231&language=English">Complementary and alternative therapies</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3232&language=English">Relaxation and distraction</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Complications of hemophilia</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The two main complications of hemophilia include joint disease and inhibitors. Learn about both of these complications and how they are diagnosed and treated.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Hemophilia and joint disease</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3233&language=English">Hemophilia and joint disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3234&language=English">Complications of joint disease in hemophilia: Arthritis and synovitis</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3235&language=English">Diagnosing joint disease</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3236&language=English">Orthopaedic surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3237&language=English">Physiotherapy to keep joints healthy</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Hemophilia and inhibitors</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3238&language=English">Hemophilia and inhibitors</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3239&language=English">Understanding inhibitors</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Hemophilia: Body and mind</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Find information about why it is important to have healthy lifestyle habits when you have hemophilia. This section also discusses relationships and gives you tips on how to talk to your significant other about your condition. Also find information about tattoos and piercings, alcohol, smoking and drugs and how they can interfere with your health.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3240&language=English">Hemophilia and keeping active</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3241&language=English">Hemophilia and everyday health care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3242&language=English">Hemophilia and managing stress</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Relationships and hemophilia</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3243&language=English">Relationships and hemophilia</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3244&language=English">Hemophilia and sex</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Lifestyle choices and your hemophilia</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3245&language=English">Lifestyle choices and your hemophilia</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3246&language=English">Hemophilia, tattoos and piercings</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3247&language=English">Hemophilia and alcohol</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3248&language=English">Hemophilia and cigarette smoking</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3249&language=English">Hemophilia and drugs</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Transition of care</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Living with hemophilia means adjusting to an additional life change as you get older: learning to take care of your hemophilia on your own. This change is not immediate and can take several months or years. Find information to help you during this transition.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3250&language=English">Switching from paediatric care to adult care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3251&language=English">Talking to health-care professionals</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h2 class="panel-title">Looking ahead</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>As a young person living with hemophilia, you will encounter many life changes, for example you may decide to attend post-secondary school, start a new job or travel. Learn how hemophilia plays a role in all of these natural life transitions and find information and tips to help you.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span><h3>Hemophilia and school</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3252&language=English">Hemophilia and school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3253&language=English">School and lifestyle</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3254&language=English">Talking to others about your hemophilia</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3255&language=English">Hemophilia and employment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"><a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3256&language=English">Hemophilia and travelling abroad</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/getting_through_the_teen_years.jpgHemophiliaTeenHemophiliaTeen Learn about how hemophilia is treated, how to manage bleeds, transitioning to adult care and how to be more proactive about your own care.Teens
Living with hand and upper limb conditionsLiving with hand and upper limb conditionsLiving with hand and upper limb conditionsLEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)Arm;NeckNAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-12-20T05:00:00ZLanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they do home, school, work, and leisure activities in their own way.</p><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they do home, school, work, and leisure activities in their own way.</p><p>The Embracing Our Limb Differences series is a video library of young people just like you with arm and hand differences doing a variety of tasks including opening a jar, shampooing their hair, typing on a computer, and many more.</p> <br> <div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/videoseries?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUy1XfS9MxGrWZ38ifea3LM" frameborder="0"></iframe> <br></div><p>To view other AboutKidsHealth videos, please visit the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/Aboutkidshealth">AboutKidsHealth YouTube channel</a>.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">About the Embracing Our Differences series</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>The Embracing Our Differences series is a video library of young people with arm and hand differences doing a variety of tasks. Learn how to submit your own video tutorial.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4002&language=English">Living with hand and upper limb conditions: Embracing Our Differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Grooming and personal care activities</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they perform grooming and other personal care activities in their own way.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4003&language=English">Performing grooming and personal care activities with arm and hand differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Kitchen activities</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they perform kitchen activities in their own way.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4004&language=English">Performing kitchen activities with arm and hand differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">School, work and computer-based activities</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Learn from young people with arm and hand differences about how they perform school, work and computer-based activities in their own way.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4005&language=English">Performing school, work, and computer-based activities with arm and hand differences</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Resources</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>View the entire Embracing Our Differences series and other resources.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjJtOP3StIuUy1XfS9MxGrWZ38ifea3LM">Embracing Our Differences series playlist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/plastic-reconstructive-surgery/#programs">SickKids Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Clinic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://www.waramps.ca/ways-we-help/child-amputees/">The CHAMP Program </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="https://hollandbloorview.ca/our-services/about-your-visit/virtual-tour/prosthetic-services">Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Prosthetic Department</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/limb-differences-learning-hub.jpghandlimbconditionsHand and Upper Limb ConditionsTeens
Eating disordersEating disordersEating disordersEEnglishNutrition;AdolescentPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseases;Healthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years) Pre-teen (9-12 years)NALanding PageLearning Hub<p>Learn about different eating disorders, the common signs and symptoms and what to do if you think you or someone you know might have an eating disorder.</p><p>Learn about different eating disorders, the common signs and symptoms and what to do if you think you or someone you know might have an eating disorder.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"><i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Eating disorders</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Eating disorders can impact your mental as well as physical health, and can also affect your family. Find out about the symptoms and treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and binge eating disorder, and how you can help yourself during recovery.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4123&language=English">What is an eating disorder</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3785&language=English">Anorexia nervosa</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3787&language=English">Bulimia nervosa</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3789&language=English">Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3791&language=English">Binge eating disorder</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4045&language=English">Relative energy deficiency in sports (RED-S)</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/iStock-1419157251.jpgeatingdisordersTeens
CancerCancerCancerCEnglishOncologyTeen (13-18 years)NANANATeen (13-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00ZLanding PageLearning Hub<p>This learning hub will help you prepare for what to expect during cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will also learn about some of the challenges you might face during treatment, and what you can expect when treatment is complete.</p><p>This learning hub will help you prepare for what to expect during cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will also learn about some of the challenges you might face during treatment, and what you can expect when treatment is complete.</p><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">About cancer</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Have you ever asked yourself why you have cancer or how cancer works? It's important to remember that cancer is not your fault and happens entirely by chance. In this section you will learn about different types of cancer, what causes cancer in young people, and the differences between healthy cells and cancer cells.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3414&language=English">What is cancer?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3415&language=English">What causes cancer?</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Types of cancer in young people</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3416&language=English">Types of cancer in young people</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3417&language=English">Brain tumours</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3419&language=English">Gliomas</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3418&language=English">Astrocytomas</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3420&language=English">Leukemia</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3421&language=English">Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3422&language=English">Acute myeloid leukemia (AML)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3423&language=English">Lymphoma</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3424&language=English">Hodgkin lymphoma</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3425&language=English">Non-Hodgkin lymphoma</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3426&language=English">Bone cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3427&language=English">Soft-tissue tumours</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3428&language=English">Malignant melanoma</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3429&language=English">Germ cell tumours</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3430&language=English">Thyroid cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3431&language=English">Other types of cancer</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3432&language=English">How will my cancer affect me now?</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Diagnosing cancer</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;">Cancer diagnosis can be a long process. Learn more about the process doctors use to diagnose cancer, the different tests you might have during diagnosis and treatment, and ways to help you cope whne you find out you have cancer. <p></p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3436&language=English">Diagnosing cancer</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Diagnostic tests</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3437&language=English">Diagnostic tests</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3809&language=English">Cancer tests and anaesthetic</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3438&language=English">Blood tests</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3442&language=English">Scans</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3443&language=English">X-rays</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3444&language=English">CT scans</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3445&language=English">Ultrasound</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3446&language=English">MRIs</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3447&language=English">PET scans</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3448&language=English">Bone scans</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3440&language=English">Biopsies</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3441&language=English">Bone marrow tests</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3439&language=English">Lumbar punctures</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3449&language=English">Coping with a cancer diagnosis</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Tests during cancer treatment</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3450&language=English">Tests during cancer treatment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3451&language=English">Kidneys: Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) test</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3452&language=English">Heart tests and cancer treatment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3453&language=English">Lung tests and cancer treatment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3454&language=English">Hearing tests and cancer treatment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3455&language=English">Dental check up and cancer treatment</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Cancer medications</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>It is important to know about cancer medications and how they will affect your body and your life. Find out how cancer medications work, how they are taken, what the possible side effects are, and how to cope with going to school and travelling while on chemotherapy.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Chemotherapy</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3458&language=English">Chemotherapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3459&language=English">How does chemotherapy work?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3460&language=English">Chemotherapy as an outpatient</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=4019&language=English">Oral cryotherapy (cold therapy) for the prevention of oral mucositis during short chemotherapy infusions</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3461&language=English">Receiving cancer medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3462&language=English">Managing medications at home</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3463&language=English">Side effects of cancer medications</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3464&language=English">Medication interactions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3465&language=English">School and chemotherapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3466&language=English">Travel and chemotherapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3467&language=English">Other issues related to chemotherapy</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Cancer treatments and support therapies</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>In addition to chemotherapy and medications, there are many different treatments for cancer. Learn about consent, the different types of treatments and therapies for cancer, and the side effects you may experience with each one.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3829&language=English">Treatments and support therapies</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3470&language=English">Consent</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Radiation therapy</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3471&language=English">Radiation therapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3828&language=English">Special considerations for radiation therapy</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3472&language=English">Types of radiation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3473&language=English">Side effects of radiation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3474&language=English">Cognitive side effects of radiation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3475&language=English">Fertility and radiation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3476&language=English">Skin changes and radiation</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Surgery and cancer</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3477&language=English">Surgery and cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3478&language=English">Types of cancer surgery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3479&language=English">Limb sparing, rotationplasty and amputation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3480&language=English">Post-operative symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3481&language=English">Managing pain after surgery</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3482&language=English">Bone marrow transplant</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3483&language=English">Complementary and alternative therapies</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">The health-care team</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>You will see many different health-care professionals throughout your cancer treatment. This section will help you understand the role each person plays in your health care and how they can help you.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3485&language=English">The health-care team</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3486&language=English">Doctor</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3487&language=English">Nurse</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3488&language=English">Nurse practitioner</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3489&language=English">Pharmacist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3490&language=English">Dietitian</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3491&language=English">Social worker</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3492&language=English">Child life specialist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3493&language=English">Physiotherapist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3494&language=English">Occupational therapist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3495&language=English">Psychologist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3496&language=English">Psychiatrist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3497&language=English">Speech-language pathologist</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3498&language=English">School teacher</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3499&language=English">Accessing cancer information online</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Communication and cancer</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Many teens find communication to be a challenge, especially when going through something as big as cancer. Discover how you can become a better communicator, and improve communication with your health-care team, friends, family and others.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3502&language=English">Communication and cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3503&language=English">Becoming a better communicator</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3504&language=English">Talking with your health-care team</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3505&language=English">Making the most of your clinic visit</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3506&language=English">Taking part in decisions</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3507&language=English">Talking to your parents about cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3508&language=English">Talking to your friends about cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3509&language=English">Maintaining relationships during cancer treatment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3510&language=English">Keeping in contact with school</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3511&language=English">Talking to your employer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3512&language=English">Communicating online</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Managing your symptoms</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Cancer and its treatments can take a toll on your body and cause a range of symptoms. Learn how to cope with the various symptoms and treatment side effects you may experience.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3514&language=English">Managing your symptoms</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3515&language=English">Cancer-related fatigue</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3517&language=English">Nausea and vomiting</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3518&language=English">Pain and cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3519&language=English">Loss of appetite</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3520&language=English">Diarrhea related to cancer treatment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3521&language=English">Sleep problems and cancer</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3516&language=English">Managing other cancer-related symptoms</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Managing stress and emotions</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Stress, worry and anxiety are normal emotions that you may experience throughout cancer treatment. Luckily there are ways to manage them. Find out how to manage stress and anxiety and deal with changes to your self-image.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3537&language=English">Coping with a life-threatening illness</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3524&language=English">Cancer and emotions</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Managing stress and anxiety</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3525&language=English">Stress and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3526&language=English">What causes stress and anxiety?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3527&language=English">Recognizing stress and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3528&language=English">Coping with stress and anxiety</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3529&language=English">Stress and thinking</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3530&language=English">Changing unhelpful thoughts</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Coping with physical changes</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3531&language=English">Feeling good about your self</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3532&language=English">Self-image</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3533&language=English">Hair loss</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3534&language=English">Central lines</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3535&language=English">Skin problems</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3536&language=English">After limb surgery</a></li></ol></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Relaxation and distraction</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>Relaxation and distraction techniques can help you prepare for stressful events and cope with difficult tests, treatments and procedures. Learn how you can use these techniques throughout your cancer treatment.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Relaxation</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3540&language=English">Relaxation</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3541&language=English">Belly breathing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2586&language=English">Relaxation with tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2587&language=English">Relaxation without tension</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=2588&language=English">Mini-relaxation</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Distraction</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3546&language=English">Distraction</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3547&language=English">Attention focusing</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3548&language=English">Imagery</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3549&language=English">Mental games</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3550&language=English">Distracting activities</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3545&language=English">Behaviour rehearsal</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3551&language=English">Meditation</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Self-monitoring and supports</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p>In this section, find out how to stick to your treatment plan, why and how to self-monitor for symptoms and side effects when on treatment, and the importance of self-monitoring for late effects when treatment is finished.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>On treatment</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3555&language=English">Your treatment plan</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3556&language=English">Regular appointments</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3557&language=English">Self-monitoring: Recognizing symptoms and side effects</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3812&language=English">The Pain Squad smartphone app</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Off treatment</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3559&language=English">Adjusting to life off treatment </a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3560&language=English">Self-monitoring after cancer treatment</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3561&language=English">Late effects</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3562&language=English">How do I self-monitor for late effects?</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3563&language=English">Resources and support groups</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">Your lifestyle</h2></div><div class="panel-body list-group" style="display:none;"><p> You can’t always control your cancer, but you can control the choices you make in your everyday life. This section covers many different ways to help you develop healthy lifestyle behaviours in the areas of nutrition, sexuality, exercise, and mental health.</p></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3566&language=English">Cancer and your lifestyle</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Physical activity</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3567&language=English">Staying active</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3568&language=English">Yoga and cancer</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Nutrition</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3569&language=English">Maintaining a healthy weight</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3570&language=English">Eating well for health</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Sexuality</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3571&language=English">Sexuality and cancer (ages 12 and 13)</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3572&language=English">Sexuality and cancer (ages 14 and up)</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3573&language=English">Cancer and depression</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3574&language=English">Drinking and drugs</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3575&language=English">Smoking and vaping</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3576&language=English">Sun exposure</a></li></ol></div><div class="panel panel-primary"><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h2 class="panel-title">After cancer</h2></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Making the transition to adult health care</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3579&language=English">Transitioning to adult health care</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3580&language=English">What is an adult care centre like?</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3581&language=English">Your three-sentence health summary</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3582&language=English">Monitoring in the future</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Higher education</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3583&language=English">Moving on: Higher education</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3584&language=English">Accessibility and support in higher education</a></li></ol></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Employment</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3585&language=English">Moving on: Working</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3586&language=English">Accessibility and support when working</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3587&language=English">Managing your finances</a></li><li><div class="panel-heading clickable"> <span class="pull-right panel-heading-collapsable-icon"> <i class="mdi mdi-chevron-down"></i></span> <h3>Current research</h3></div><ol class="list-group" style="display:none;"><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3589&language=English">Cancer research</a></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3590&language=English">The future of cancer research</a></li></ol></li><li class="list-group-item"> <a class="overview-links" href="/Article?contentid=3591&language=English">Resources</a></li></ol></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Teen_cancer_landing_page.jpgcancercancer Learn what to expect from cancer diagnosis and treatment, including some of the challenges you might face during treatment. Teens

 

 

Adjusting to life with a chronic conditionAdjusting to life with a chronic conditionAdjusting to life with a chronic conditionAEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00Z7.9000000000000068.5000000000000609.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Being diagnosed with a chronic condition has a large impact on your life. Read about practical ways to cope as you adjust to life with a chronic condition.</p><h2>Living with a chronic condition</h2><p>A diagnosis of a chronic (long-term) condition can have a major impact on your life. Living with a chronic condition often involves dealing with symptoms, taking medications, going to more medical appointments than usual and having more frequent tests and procedures to monitor any changes.</p><p>As a result, you might miss school, activities with friends or family, hobbies and sports. This is all happening when people are expecting you to become more independent, which in itself can feel stressful or overwhelming at times.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/e0JMtabUVvQ?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title">Comfort your pain</span> <span class="vid-type">audio</span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This audio meditation helps you explore and bring comfort to an unwanted thought or an area of physical or emotional discomfort. Use this meditation when you are feeling overwhelmed or experiencing physical discomfort. Follow along, focusing with kindness and curiosity on an uncomfortable area of your body.</p></div><h2>Getting used to a new normal</h2><p>Different people respond in different ways when they are diagnosed with a chronic condition. There is no one ‘right’ way to feel or react. Some children and teens feel angry, sad, worried or even relieved to have an answer. Others might feel self-conscious because they’re different from their friends or have a hard time relating to their friends. This can all be a part of the process of adjusting to “a new normal” for you and your family.</p><p>Click through the interactive below to learn about some of the common signs people have when they are having difficulty coping with or adjusting to life with a chronic condition.<br></p><div class="symptoms-container" id="adjusting-life"> <a href="#" class="symp-fullscreen"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/Landing_screen_mobile.png" alt="" /></a> <a href="#" class="symp-close-full material-icons pull-right">close</a> <div class="instruction-container"><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL</span></div><div class="thumbnail-col"><div class="symp-title"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL</span> </div></div><div class="anim-instructions"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/SpeechBubbles_CopingDiff.png" alt="" /> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Frustration, anger</span> <p>A chronic condition may require someone to drop or limit some favourite activities or develop new routines to manage their health. Understandably, this can sometimes lead to frustration, anger and resentment.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/Frustration.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Irritability, sensitivity</span> <p>If someone isn’t coping well with a chronic condition, they may feel sensitive or self-conscious about their abilities or their routine, and may feel ‘different’ or separate from their friends.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/Sensitive.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed</span> <p>With a chronic condition, someone may worry about many different things: their symptoms and how to manage them, fitting in with their friends, achieving what they want in life or how their health might change.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/Anxious.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Sadness (depression) </span> <p>When adjusting to a ‘new normal’, it’s natural to feel sad about losing an old routine or adjusting expectations. Ongoing sadness can sometimes become hopelessness and despair, both signs of depression.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/Sadness.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Isolation</span> <p>Someone who feels sad or self-conscious about their chronic condition may avoid spending time with loved ones and friends. They may simply not be in the mood or fear that their condition would ‘get in the way’.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/Isolation.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Ignoring chronic condition</span> <p>Some people may be in denial about their chronic condition and how it affects their life. They may miss medical appointments, skip medications, ignore symptoms or over-exert themselves to still feel ‘normal’.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/ignorecondition.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Overly protective behaviour</span> <p>The need to monitor and manage a chronic condition can push some people to go too far to keep themselves ‘well’. They may rest or stay home or in bed or avoid any behaviour that they feel could lead to symptoms.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/OverProtective.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Personality changes</span> <p>Someone dealing with a chronic condition may lose interest in hobbies and activities, suddenly change their sleep habits, start thinking differently about things or undergo other personality changes.<br></p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Coping%20Difficulty/PersonalityChange.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><br></div></div><h3 class="main-title">COPING DIFFICULTY <span class="symp-subtitle">Common Signs</span></h3></div><p>It is important to allow yourself time to get to know what life will be like with a chronic condition. At the time of diagnosis, the condition might feel like it is taking over your life, but it will not be like this forever. The more you understand about your condition, the better you will be able to find ways to cope with and manage your symptoms. This will also make it easier for you to get on track with your “new normal”.</p><h2>Practical ways to cope with a chronic condition</h2><h3>Acknowledge your feelings</h3><p>Allow yourself to experience whatever feelings might come up – disappointment, frustration, worry, anger. Don’t ignore your feelings or pretend they don’t exist. You can’t address or manage feelings that you ignore.<br></p><div class="asset-video"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OL7AQbGh7WU"></iframe> </div> <p></p><h3>Remember that moments pass</h3><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <span class="vid-title">Dilute the </span><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title">yuck</span><span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This audio meditation helps you identify pleasant or neutral experiences in the middle of discomfort. When you are overwhelmed, feeling pain or discomfort or going through any unwanted experience, use this guided meditation to help you recognize pleasant experiences, no matter how small. Follow along with the meditation to find areas that bring you comfort.</p></div><p>Remind yourself that you can get used to your condition and won’t feel sad, worried (or any other unwanted feeling) forever. The opposite is also true: just as tough moments pass, happiness doesn’t last forever either. Everybody goes through a wide range of feelings and experiences as part of a full and rich life.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <span class="vid-title">Visualize your </span><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title">pain</span><span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This audio meditation helps you visualize your pain. When you are struggling with pain, use this meditation to help discover a new way to experience and respond to it. Follow along with the meditation so you can move from resisting and feeling frustrated about your pain to being open and curious and exploring it in detail without judgment. </p></div><h3>Talk to others</h3><p>Talk to your family, friends and healthcare team about how you feel. Talking about your feelings can help you feel better, learn to cope and <a href="/Article?contentid=3779&language=English">get support if you need it</a>.</p><h3>Take time to understand your condition</h3><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <span class="vid-title">Soften, soothe, </span><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title">allow</span><span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This audio meditation helps you soften towards discomfort. Instead of resisting uncomfortable experiences or distracting yourself when they arise, use this meditation to help you develop an attitude of tenderness towards your suffering. As you follow the meditation, take time to allow your discomfort to come and go. If you become too uncomfortable, bring yourself back to your breath.</p></div><p>Give yourself time to get to know your symptoms and figure out when you need to contact your healthcare team.</p><p>When you are diagnosed with a chronic condition, you are hearing and reading a lot of new information. This can take some time to get used to, so don’t be afraid to ask questions, even if you asked them before but forgot the answers. Your healthcare team is there to help.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <span class="vid-title">Ice </span><span class="vid-title"></span><span class="vid-title">cube</span><span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span><span class="vid-type"></span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This audio meditation helps you find a new way to experience discomfort. Use this meditation to explore the thoughts, feelings or sensations that come with being upset or feeling physical pain. Holding an ice cube in the palm of your hand, follow along with the meditation to explore any feelings of discomfort. Have a towel handy to clean up the melted ice once the meditation is finished. </p><p></p></div><h3>Keep up with your interests</h3><p>Stay involved in your hobbies and continue to do the things you love. If you played sports, for instance, keep involved in whatever way you can. It is important to stay connected to the people and things that are important to you.</p><h3>Decide what to tell others</h3><p>Take the time to figure out how much or how little you’d like to tell other people about your chronic condition. You can share as much as or little as you would like. </p><p>It can be helpful to come up with a health summary (a one or two sentence description of your chronic condition). Once you memorize the summary, you will feel ready when people ask questions. </p><p>Of course, if you don’t want to talk about your condition on a given day, it is also okay to say so.</p><h3>Kids Help Phone – <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">kidshelpphone.ca</a></h3><p>Kids Help Phone is a 24/7 e-mental health service offering free, confidential support to young people.</p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/dealing-illness-how-cope/">Dealing with an illness: How to cope</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/how-can-i-cope-with-my-feelings-about-the-future/">How can I cope with my feelings about the future?</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/need-to-have-a-tough-conversation-with-someone-heres-how/">Need to have a tough conversation with someone? Here’s how.</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Adjusting_to_life_with_a_chronic_condition-Teen.jpg ​Being diagnosed with a chronic condition has a large impact on your life. Read about practical ways to cope and adjust to life with a chronic condition. Teens
Belly breathingBelly breathingBelly breathingBEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)NANANon-drug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.2000000000000068.4000000000000333.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Belly breathing is a deep breathing exercise that can help you relax and manage symptoms. Discover practice tips to help you learn this relaxation technique.</p><h2>What is belly breathing?<br></h2><p>Belly breathing is one of the best and easiest ways to <a href="/Article?contentid=3540&language=English">relax</a>. It can help you manage pain and nausea and also distract you from unpleasant situations. </p><p>Belly breathing is also called abdominal or diaphragmatic (say: dye-a-frag-MAT-ik) breathing because you are using muscles at the bottom of your lungs and in your abdomen (belly) to breathe deeply. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Belly breathing uses the muscles at the bottom of your lungs and in your abdomen to help you breathe deeply.</li><li>Chest breathing is shallow and can be fast paced, while belly breathing is about deep and slow breaths.</li><li>Practising belly breathing will help you relax when you are stressed, in pain or feeling nauseous.</li></ul><p>Breathing is an important part of relaxation because our bodies need a constant supply of air to work smoothly. You can use two different ways to breathe in: chest breathing and abdominal (belly) breathing.</p><ul><li>Chest breathing is the way that we normally breathe. It is shallow and can be fast. When you are stressed or anxious, your chest breathing becomes even faster. You might even feel short of breath. Shallow breathing forces your heart to work harder to move oxygen around your body. This extra effort can lead to other changes in your body such as tense muscles and sweating.</li><li>Belly breathing is all about breathing slowly and deeply. It involves drawing air deep into the lungs and releasing it slowly. By breathing slowly and deeply, your body will receive enough oxygen and you can start to relax.</li></ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Belly Breathing</span> <div class="asset-animation"> <iframe src="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/AKH/animations/Belly%20Breathing/belly_breathing_EN_canvas.aspx"></iframe> </div></figure> <h2>Practice tips</h2><ul><li>Once you learn to do belly breathing while lying down, practise it the next few times while sitting up in a chair. </li><li>After that, practise belly breathing standing up with your eyes open. </li><li>Practise your breathing exercises a few times each day. If you practise one to three times a day, you will learn belly breathing quickly. </li><li>Belly breathing can be done anywhere, anytime, without anyone knowing that you are doing it.</li></ul><p>Remember, the best way to become good at belly breathing is to keep practising. The better you are at belly breathing, the faster you’ll be able to relax when you’re feeling stressed or anxious or having pain. It’s also worth trying belly breathing when you feel strong emotions washing over you or you feel nauseous.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Belly%20breathing_interactive.png Belly breathing is a deep breathing exercise that can help you relax. Discover practice tips to help you learn this relaxation technique.Teens
Bulimia nervosaBulimia nervosaBulimia nervosaBEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2023-03-13T04:00:00Z10.100000000000054.1000000000000723.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder where a person overeats and feels out of control, called binge eating, and does things to make up for overeating to prevent weight gain, called purging. Learn about the signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatments.</p><h2>What is bulimia nervosa? </h2><p>Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder where a person struggles with eating a larger amount of food than most people would eat over a short time, once a week or more for at least three months. A person with bulimia nervosa worries about gaining weight, feels shameful about the binge eating and will engage in unhealthy or dangerous purging behaviours (e.g., vomiting, taking pills, dieting to extremes or doing too much exercise) to prevent weight gain.</p><p>People with bulimia nervosa may be thin, average weight, or overweight. In addition to bingeing and purging, someone with bulimia nervosa feels unhappy about their appearance and wants to lose weight. People with bulimia nervosa may not seek help on their own because they may be embarrassed by or ashamed of their eating patterns. However, with treatment, they can often get better.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder where a person has a distorted body image and a fear of gaining weight. </li><li>The disorder involves both binge eating (eating much more than most people would in a short period of time and feeling guilty or ashamed) and purging (self-induced vomiting, taking laxatives, diuretics, weight loss pills, fasting, or exercising) to try to prevent weight gain. </li><li>It is important to see a health-care provider if you experience episodes of binge eating or purging, or you think you might have bulimia nervosa or another eating disorder. </li></ul><h2>What are the signs and symptoms of bulimia nervosa?</h2><p>Bulimia nervosa has a range of signs and symptoms. </p><div class="symptoms-container" id="symp-bulimia"> <a href="#" class="symp-fullscreen"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/B_Landing_screen_mobile.png" alt="" /></a> <a href="#" class="symp-close-full material-icons pull-right">close</a> <div class="instruction-container"><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL</span></div><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL</span></div><div class="anim-instructions"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/SpeechBubbles_Bulimia.png" alt="" /> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Eating quickly or large amounts of food in a short time</span> <p>A person with bulimia may eat faster than expected in an effort to eat a lot of food in a short time.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia01_eatingQuickLarge.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Eating when nobody is around</span> <p>Binge eating has links with guilt and shame. If someone has bulimia, they might eat in the middle of the night or when no one else around and may hide food wrappers around the home.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia06_sneakFood.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Disappearing immediately after a meal</span> <p>Someone with bulimia tends to purge or otherwise compensate for their eating. Purging can include vomiting or taking pills such as laxatives to affect how the body responds to food.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia05_dissapear.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Becoming more irritable</span> <p>Because their brains are starved of nutrients, a person with bulimia might not think clearly. They may become irritable and have emotional outbursts and sudden mood swings.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia02_irritable.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"> <i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button></div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL </span><span class="symp-title"></span><span class="symp-title">SIGNS</span><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons">home</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-close"><i class="material-icons"></i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Puffy face</span> <p>Because of their repeated purging, someone with bulimia may develop swollen parotid glands (just in front of their ears). When these glands are swollen, they can make cheeks look puffy.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia03_puffyFace.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Calloused knuckles</span> <p>If someone with bulimia engages in regular purging, their knuckles can get calloused. This is from repeatedly putting their fingers down their throat to induce vomiting. </p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia04_callous.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Dramatic changes in weight</span> <p>Someone with bulimia often has average weight, but this can rise and fall quickly due to bingeing and purging cycles.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia09_dramaticWeightChange.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Broken blood vessels in eyes or face</span> <p>Repeated attempts to vomit puts pressure on the small blood vessels in the face and eyes. When someone retches regularly over a short time, these small blood vessels can start to burst.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia08_brokenVessels.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Dizziness, confusion and weakness</span> <p>Inappropriate intake of nutrition and fluids, along with purging, may interfere with a person’s electrolyte levels and cause them to feel dizzy, confused or weak.<br></p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Bulimia/Bulimia07_dizziness.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"> <i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons"></i></button></div></div><h3 class="main-title">Bulimia <span class="symp-subtitle">Common Signs</span></h3></div><h3>Physical signs of bulimia nervosa</h3><ul><li>can be of any body weight, shape or size </li><li>puffiness of the face, especially around the cheeks</li><li>callouses or marks on the knuckles</li><li>broken blood vessels around the eyes and face</li><li>bad breath because of vomiting</li><li>dizziness</li><li>vomiting blood</li><li>digestive problems</li><li>confusion, weakness or fatigue due changes in important electrolytes such as potassium or sodium</li><li>thinning hair</li><li>tooth decay</li><li>potentially dangerous and sometimes fatal changes in heart rate</li></ul><h3>Behavioural signs of bulimia nervosa</h3><ul><li>hide their binging and purging behaviors </li><li>skipping meals </li><li>weight fluctuations (increases and decreases) because of bingeing and purging </li><li>eating large amounts in a short time </li><li>eating quickly </li><li>hiding food wrappers around the house </li><li>eating in the middle of the night </li><li>disappearing to the bathroom after eating </li><li>not wanting to eat with others </li><li>becoming more irritable or having mood swings and outbursts </li><li>judge themselves based on their body weight </li></ul><h2>What if I think I may have bulimia nervosa? </h2><p> <strong>Tell someone</strong>. Tell a trusted adult such as a parent, caregiver, teacher, coach or therapist. Explain your concerns and ask for their help. </p><p> <strong>Don’t feel alone</strong>. It can be hard to tell someone about your eating disorder thoughts and behaviors. You might be concerned about how they will react. However, it can help to have an open and honest conversation about your eating disorder with those you trust. It will help you feel less alone. </p><p> <strong>Get help early</strong>. It is important for you to see your health-care provider as soon as possible. Your health-care provider can help to determine whether you have an eating disorder and can also assess how serious the situation is. The sooner a diagnosis is made, the quicker you can start treatment, and the better chance for recovery. </p><p>It’s important to see your health-care provider if you: </p><ul><li>are worried you might have bulimia nervosa or another eating disorder </li><li>have out-of-control eating episodes or binges </li><li>are purging by making yourself throw up after you eat or taking pills to alter how food affects your body </li></ul><p>It is especially important to see a health-care provider if you experience pain in your body, especially chest or stomach pain, or you begin to vomit blood. </p><h2>What will a health-care provider do during an assessment for bulimia nervosa? </h2><p>A health-care provider will do a complete history (medical, nutritional and psychosocial history) and a thorough physical examination including: </p><ul><li>measuring your weight and height (plotting measurement on a growth curve) </li><li>taking your lying and standing blood pressure and heart rate </li><li>taking your temperature </li><li>assessing your pubertal growth development </li></ul><p>They may also do some initial tests including blood and urine tests to check if there are abnormalities and an electrocardiogram to check how the heart is functioning. </p><h2>How is bulimia nervosa treated? </h2><p>If the health-care provider determines that a person has bulimia nervosa, they will arrange for appropriate care. Eating disorder care is usually done with multiple health-care professionals including pediatrician or adolescent medicine doctor or family doctor or nurse practitioner, nurses, dietitians, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers who specialize in treating children and teens with eating disorders. </p><p>The health-care provider will decide if the patient can be managed as an outpatient (outside the hospital), either in the health-care provider’s office, or in a specialized eating disorder program. </p><p>The first treatment recommended for young people is an outpatient treatment is called family-based treatment, which focuses on recovery of the eating disorder. Parents/caregivers play an essential role in the treatment and recovery of their child. Family-based treatment includes 3 treatment phases. </p><ul><li>Phase 1 focuses on weight restoration. Parents, supported by the therapist, take responsibility for making sure that the adolescent is eating sufficiently and also takes on all meal planning and preparation. </li><li>Phase 2 is when substantial weight recovery has occurred and the adolescent gradually assumes responsibility for their own eating. </li><li>Phase 3 is when weight is restored and the focus is on general issues of adolescent development. </li></ul><p>If the health-care provider finds that the patient is too sick for outpatient treatment, they may refer the patient for urgent hospitalization. </p><p>The goals of treatment are to: </p><ul><li>ensure that the adolescent is medically safe </li><li>achieve a weight that guarantees healthy growth and development </li><li>stop the cycles of bingeing and purging </li><li>work on having all types of food in moderation, including foods the adolescent may have binged on </li><li>help manage any emotions about eating, including any worries about weight </li></ul><p>If you are experiencing depression or anxiety in addition to bulimia nervosa, your health-care team may suggest other treatments for those mental health disorders once the eating disorder is under control. </p><p>Sometimes your health-care team may also suggest medication. Antidepressants can help with depression or anxiety and can sometimes also help with urges to binge or purge. </p><p>Full recovery from bulimia nervosa is possible. It is important to remember that an early diagnosis and treatment and an early response to treatment may be associated with better outcomes. </p><p>SickKids has an eating disorder program that treats children and teens who are struggling with symptoms of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. For more information on our program visit: <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/adolescent-medicine/">www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinical-departments/adolescent-medicine/</a></p><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><p> <a href="https://anad.org/">ANAD - National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders</a> (United States) </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Bulimia-Interactive.png Learn about the common behavioural and physical signs and symptoms of bulimia nervosa with this interactive click through. Teens
Physical activity and mental health: OverviewPhysical activity and mental health: OverviewPhysical activity and mental health: OverviewPEnglishPreventionTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00Z10.100000000000056.8000000000000553.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Regular physical activity has a range of benefits for your physical and mental health. But sometimes it is difficult to know exactly what type of exercise is best and how much activity should be part of your routine every week.</p><h2>How exactly is physical activity good for my health?</h2><h3>Physical health</h3><p>Regular physical activity helps your bones become stronger and builds a healthy heart and stronger muscles. When you exercise, your body releases chemicals called endorphins. These natural painkillers can ease certain types of stomach or back pain as well as improve mood.</p><h3>Brain function</h3><p>Regular <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3784&language=English">moderate-intensity</a> exercise can help improve your focus and memory. Exercise also helps you improve your motor skills (such as hand-eye co-ordination), problem-solving skills and ability to learn new things. Not surprisingly, these all combine to help you do better at school and other activities. </p><h3>Emotional and mental health</h3><p>The endorphins that the brain releases during exercise help to improve your mood, energy levels and even your sleep.</p><p>If you experience a lot of unwanted thoughts, for instance, exercise can help your brain focus on the demands of the physical activity instead. This helps you develop new skills and achieve a sense of accomplishment.</p><p>If you feel sad, a focus, such as a sport, may relieve some of your feelings. Being with others and sharing experiences with them can foster friendships and help you feel less alone. Even working towards common goals, for example as part of a team, can help you develop a sense of achievement, which can improve how you feel. </p><p>Sometimes we get too focused on the way we look. However, regular activity helps us see and appreciate all the amazing things our bodies can do. Over time, we can realize that feeling healthy is an important reason on its own for making sure our body stays strong. </p><h2>I know physical activity is good for me, but I rarely feel like doing it </h2><p>If you have depression or anxiety, or even just an “off” day, exercise may be the last thing on your mind. Remind yourself that you don’t need to be the best or the fastest, but try to do some physical activity because you will likely feel better afterwards. </p><p>Remember, physical activity releases those chemicals called endorphins that will make you feel less anxious and sad and can put you in a good mood. If you’re doing something your own, make a deal with yourself to do just 10 or 15 minutes (if you can) to start off – sometimes when you actually get started you might feel like doing more. Even a short five-minute walk puts you further ahead of the person sitting on the couch. </p><p>If you find it hard to motivate yourself every day, try setting some weekly goals, like “I’m going to do something physical at least once per week.” It’s okay to start low to begin with. Many apps can help you track your activity and some even offer rewards for a certain level of activity each day or week. Other things to keep you motivated include doing an activity with a friend so that it’s harder to skip, trying something new or trying different activities each time to give you some variety.</p><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. Please take 5 minutes to complete our <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey</a>.</p><h3>Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) – <a href="http://www.camh.ca/">camh.ca</a></h3><p>CAMH is a mental health and addiction teaching and research hospital that provides a wide range of clinical care services for patients of all ages and families.</p><p> <a href="https://youtu.be/qMnQFTy3t30">Mood Matters: How Food, Movement & Sleep Can Have an Impact on You</a></p>exercisehttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ID%203783%20Phys%20Act%20and%20Mental%20Health.jpg Regular physical activity can benefit your physical and mental health. Learn about how routine exercise can improve your strength, focus and mood. Teenshttps://youtu.be/bFzS2i1hDEs
Sleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routineSleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routineSleep and mental health: Sorting out your sleep routineSEnglishAdolescent;PsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Sleep_vid.jpg2019-01-04T05:00:00Z6.6000000000000076.4000000000000466.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>​You can do a number of things to set yourself up for good quality <a href="/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">sleep</a> night after night. <br></p><h2>Develop healthy bedtime habits</h2><ul><li>Follow a regular schedule. Go to bed at around the same time every night and wake up at the same time in the morning. On weekends, your bedtime might be later, but try not to go to bed (or wake up) more than two hours after your usual times during the week.</li><li>Avoid coffee, tea, soda or pop, energy drinks and chocolate a few hours before bed. Caffeine and sugar tell your brain to stay up even later than usual. Cigarettes and alcohol will also interfere with your sleep.</li><li>If you’re having trouble sleeping at night, take some deep relaxing breaths, focusing on your breath as it goes in and out. Deep breathing for five to 10 minutes may help you become more relaxed and sleepy. You can also listen along to these audios that help you prepare for sleep.</li></ul><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RQJNdVtHxlY?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title">Time for rest</span> <span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span> </div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This audio meditation can help you relax. You may use this meditation whenever you need to take a nap or go to sleep. Get yourself into a comfortable position lying down and make sure you will not be disturbed.<br><br><br></p></div><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video vid-small"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RpHvQkHYrZ0?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title">Allowing rest</span> <span class="vid-type">audio</span><span class="vid-type"></span> </div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This audio meditation helps your body and mind relax. Use this meditation to find moment of rest and peace or when you need to take a nap or go to sleep. Get yourself into a comfortable position lying down and make sure you will not be disturbed.</p></div><ul><li>If you tend to feel wide awake at bedtime, try doing some <a href="/article?contentid=3783&language=english">physical activity</a> earlier in the evening so you naturally feel more tired. If that doesn’t work, do something relaxing to help you wind down and feel more sleepy. Yoga, light stretching, reading a book or writing in a journal can all help.</li><li>Keep a diary or a to-do list by your bed so you can jot down any tasks or worries before you go to sleep. This reduces the chance that you’ll wake up feeling worried or stressed. You can also watch this animation, which reminds you how you can get ready for a good night’s sleep.</li></ul><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2fbaoqkY0Qk?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Sleep: A bedtime story</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use: </strong>This is a bedtime ritual you may follow every night, if you wish. It walks you through preparing for sleep. It’s best to view this on a tablet or cellphone that you can put aside easily. You may stop and start the video at any time. In case you fall asleep, keep the volume low and turn autoplay to off.<br></p></div><h2>Create a comfortable sleep environment</h2><ul><li>Make sure your room is cool and dark enough.</li><li>Keep your bed for sleeping only. Don’t do homework in bed. This activity can make your brain link bedtime with stress or active thinking when you are trying to sleep. </li><li>Avoid having a television, computer, tablet or cell phone in the bedroom. These can stimulate your brain rather than relax it and add to your daily screen time.</li></ul><h2>Have a good start to your morning</h2><ul><li>Get in the habit of planning and prepping your breakfast before bed. This could be as simple as cutting up some fruit or making a breakfast wrap that you can quickly grab in the morning.</li><li>Pack your backpack and lay out your clothes the night before. At night there is more time to look for missing homework or that favourite T-shirt that might still be in the washing machine.</li><li>If you have trouble waking up in time to shower in the morning, take your shower before bed or earlier in the evening.</li><li>Set an alarm clock to wake you up in the morning so that you don’t need to rely on someone else to wake you.</li></ul><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. Please take 5 minutes to complete our <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey</a>.</p><h3>Kids Help Phone – <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">kidshelpphone.ca</a></h3><p>Kids Help Phone is a 24/7 e-mental health service offering free, confidential support to young people.</p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/sleep-diary/">Sleep Diary</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/all-night-get-better-sleep-these-tips/">Up all night? Get a better sleep with these tips.</a></p><h3>Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) – <a href="http://www.camh.ca/">camh.ca</a></h3><p>CAMH is a mental health and addiction teaching and research hospital that provides a wide range of clinical care services for patients of all ages and families.</p><p> <a href="https://youtu.be/qMnQFTy3t30">Mood Matters: How Food, Movement & Sleep Can Have an Impact on You</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/iCanCopeSCD/goals_of_module_sleep_teen_SCD_J4T.jpgSleep: A bedtime story Use this video meditation every night as a bedtime ritual to learn tips on how to calm down and relax your mind before sleep.Teenshttps://www.youtube.com/embed/2fbaoqkY0Qk?rel=0
Transitioning to adult careTransitioning to adult careTransitioning to adult careTEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesTeen (13-18 years)NAhttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/How_to_be_with_uncertainty-play_icon.png2021-03-03T05:00:00Z8.3000000000000063.00000000000002853.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn what to expect when making the switch to adult care, and how to prepare for taking charge of your own care.</p><h2>Getting ready</h2><p>Moving to a new adult health-care team can bring mixed emotions, including excitement, fear, relief or sadness. You have likely become familiar with the hospital and staff, and you have developed a routine around your health care. When making the switch to adult care, it can help if you know more about how things will work as an adult patient.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Transitioning to adult health care usually happens around the time that you turn 18, when you are legally considered an adult.</li><li>Adult care is patient-centred, which means you will make decisions and manage your health independently.</li><li>You can prepare for the transition to adult care by becoming knowledgeable about your treatment and health history, and comfortable with independently managing your medications, scheduling your appointments, and making healthy lifestyle choices.</li></ul><h2>A time for transition</h2><h3>What is transition?</h3><p>Transition means moving from one life stage to another. It involves change and adapting to change, which can be exciting but sometimes scary. The best way to deal with any transition is to plan ahead and be prepared. Preparing for a transition involves learning, in advance, the skills that you will need to succeed in a new life stage.</p><p>During your teen years, you will go through a number of transitions. You will transition from high school to higher education, or to the world of work. You will also experience health-specific transitions; for example, being on treatment to being off treatment, being off treatment to attending follow-up care, stopping one medication to take another, etc.</p><div class="call-out"><div class="asset-video"> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_vWMe3A-IKY?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <span class="vid-title"> <strong>Feelings of uncertainty and how to manage them</strong></span></div><p> <strong>How to use:</strong> This video provides tools for coping with uncertainty and unknowns about the future, whether we're waiting on something specific, such as test results, or we want to know what will happen later in the day, next week or in the future. The tools in this video help with regaining perspective to focus on the things we can control right here and right now.</p></div><h3>When will I transition to adult care?</h3><p>One very important transition will be the move from receiving your health care in a paediatric centre to receiving it in either an adult centre or from your primary-care provider. This move is known as a health-care transition and usually happens around the time that you turn 18, when you are legally considered an adult. There is no set age for this transition; so if you are still in active treatment when you turn 18, you may be able to finish your treatment with your paediatric team. Your health-care team can talk to you about the health-care transition and help you get prepared.</p><p>You will still get care after you no longer go to your paediatric centre; it will just be in an adult hospital, adult clinic or from a primary-care provider instead. Your paediatric health-care team will recommend and refer you to where you should be going to continue your care, and they will arrange for the transfer.</p><p>The new health-care providers you see will be used to working mostly with adults. Adult hospitals are used to treating patients who are already familiar with managing their own care, so it is very helpful by this point if you know the basic information about your health history, such as your diagnosis and any ongoing health issues that you may be experiencing. At first, your adult health-care provider may need to do some tests that were already done at your paediatric clinic. This is necessary so that they can get to know you and become familiar with your specific health-care needs.</p><h3>Why do I have to transition to adult care?</h3><p>Your paediatric health-care team is made up of doctors who specialize in children’s and teens’ health. As you become an adult, your health-care needs change and will be better met in a hospital or clinic for adults, or in a primary-care provider’s office. Continuing your care is very important because you may need special follow-up care as you continue to get older.</p><h3>Advice from other teens</h3><p>It can take time to develop confidence in a new health-care team, especially if the environment is different than what you are used to. Try to keep an open mind. Remember that different does not mean worse!</p><h2>What is an adult care centre like?</h2><p>Like some other teenagers, you may be excited about your move to adult care. Or you may be nervous to leave the paediatric team that you have gotten to know so well. Both reactions are normal. Being prepared and knowing what to expect can make your transition smoother.</p><ul><li>Adult centres usually do not have the same bright colours on the walls, or games and things to do in the waiting rooms.</li><li>Most of the other patients in adult care will be much older than you.</li><li>If you need to stay in the hospital, you probably won’t have your own room, unless your health insurance can pay for it.</li><li>If you are staying overnight, prepare ahead and make sure you bring along things to entertain yourself, especially if you know in advance that you are going to be admitted. Remember to bring a charger for your devices.</li></ul><h3>What are the similarities between paediatric and adult care?</h3><p>Both paediatric care and adult care are focused on your health. Helping you stay as healthy as possible is the ultimate goal.</p><h3>What’s the main difference?</h3><p>The main difference is in the focus of care:</p><ul><li>Paediatric care is family-centred. Your family may have been with you during appointments and involved in making decisions about your care.</li><li>Adult care is patient-centred. This means you (the patient) get to take a lead role in making decisions and managing your health. You get to be empowered to take care of yourself! While this may be a bit overwhelming at first, it’s a great opportunity to start gaining some independence.</li></ul><p>Your health-care provider will expect to hear from you and will ask you questions directly. You may be expected to attend appointments on your own, but you can request that a family member or close friend come in with you for support.</p><h2>How can I prepare for the transition?</h2><h3>You are the most important part of the team</h3><p>You are the best person to look after your own interests. You need to learn how to be in control of your health and personal life goals. If you know what you want to do with your life, your health-care team can help direct you to the best treatment plans to meet your goals.</p><p>Transition takes time, so it is best to start as early as possible. Your health-care team will help you. You can prepare for the transition by:</p><ul><li>getting to know your treatment history and being able to give a three-sentence summary of your health</li><li>practicing self-monitoring (paying attention to your body) and describing your symptoms in appointments</li><li>managing your medications, scheduling appointments, and making healthy lifestyle choices</li><li>answering questions in appointments; being involved in making decisions; and, over time, spending part or all of the appointment alone with your health-care provider</li><li>starting to learn about your health insurance and the types of treatments it covers</li></ul><p>Many teenagers and young adults feel better knowing they are in control. Learning the skills to help with this process can take time; but, in the end, these skills can help you achieve your goals for the future.</p><p>Some teenagers find it easier to have a checklist of tasks or goals to help prepare for their health-care transition. To make your transition a bit smoother, fill out a <a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/41196-Patient%20readiness%20checklist.pdf">transition readiness checklist</a>.</p><h3>Your three-sentence health summary</h3><p>In an adult centre, you will be expected to describe your health history in a quick phrase (about three sentences long). It can help to have some practice with this.</p><p>Your three-sentence health summary includes the following information.</p><ul><li> <strong>Sentence 1:</strong> Age, diagnosis, and brief health history</li><li> <strong>Sentence 2:</strong> Your treatment plan thus far</li><li> <strong>Sentence 3:</strong> Questions or concerns to raise during the visit</li></ul><p>Write out these three sentences and practice with the health-care providers you see most often. They will help make sure you’ve got all the details correct. If they suggest adding or changing anything, be sure to write these suggestions down. After you give your summary, expect your health-care provider to ask you more questions. This does not mean that you have missed information, just that the person is being thorough.</p><p>If your parent(s) or caregiver usually does the talking during appointments, let them know before the appointment that you want to practice giving your health summary and answering questions by yourself.</p><p>Here is an example of a health summary:</p><div class="callout2"><p> <em>“I am a 17-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). I was treated with multiple chemotherapy drugs and steroids. I am now experiencing pain in both of my knees, and pain medicine isn’t working.”</em></p></div><h3>Self-monitoring</h3><p>Even if you are no longer receiving treatment in adult care, it is important to continue to pay attention to your body. You are often the first person to notice when something changes. When you practise self-monitoring, you have a better chance of noticing a problem sooner. This means that you and/or your parents can then share the problem with your health-care team.</p><h3>Be in charge of your medications</h3><ul><li>Keep a list with names and dosage amounts of your medications, including vitamins, supplements and over-the-counter medications.</li><li>If you are put on a new medication, write it down on the same list as your other medications.</li><li>Before your appointment, check your prescriptions for the number of repeats. If you only have a few repeats, be sure to ask your doctor for a refill prescription.</li></ul><h3>Making and keeping appointments</h3><p>In adult care, the responsibility to make and keep appointments lies with you, the patient.</p><ul><li>Make sure you keep track of your appointments (phone, agenda, calendar, etc). If you miss an appointment it will be your responsibility to call the clinic and rebook. This is different from many paediatric clinics, where they will call you or your family if you miss an appointment.</li><li>If you realize an appointment time is not convenient for you, it is your responsibility to book a new appointment time.</li><li>Make a list of all the team members at the clinics you visit. Know their names, their roles, and how to contact them.</li><li>Ask who is in charge of scheduling appointments. Talk to this person if there is more than one health-care provider that you would like to see on the same day.</li><li>Think about how you will be getting to your appointments and give yourself enough travel time. For example, find out how you will get there, and where the building and clinic is located.</li></ul><p>It can be helpful to consult this <a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/TransitioningToAdultCare_AppointmentChecklist.pdf">appointment checklist</a> before every appointment.</p><h3>Tips for talking with your doctor<br></h3><p>Your doctors, nurses and social workers have a very good idea of what will help with your transition to the adult health-care system. Talking to these people can help prepare you for this change. Sometimes, it can be hard to talk with them, especially if your parents always did the talking for you.</p><p>Here are a few tips to help you better communicate with your doctor and health-care team:</p><ul><li>Ask questions! There’s no such thing as a stupid question.</li><li>When you do not understand something, ask to have it explained to you again.</li><li>When you need help, ask!</li><li>Be honest and say what you think.</li><li>Write down what was said during an appointment so you will remember what happened.</li><li>If you have questions after your appointment, phone your doctor or nurse to make sure your questions are answered.</li><li>Start your visit without your parents in the room. This way, if you have a private matter to discuss, you can do it then and you won’t have to ask them to leave the room.</li><li>Ask your doctor to explain everything to you. Make sure that you understand all the benefits and possible complications of your treatment plan.</li><li>Remember: This is your body. Make sure that you are comfortable with the plan. If you have any concerns, tell your nurse or doctor. This will help them to find the best treatment plan that works for you.</li><li>Follow-up after two weeks if you have not heard about things you discussed during your visit: test results, referrals, or new tests bookings.</li></ul><h3>Health insurance</h3><p>Your parents have probably paid for your medicines either through their health insurance or by filling in forms that will help get government coverage. As you get older, you will need to consider how you will become responsible for paying for your own medications. For example, if your parents have insurance and you stay in school, your medicines will usually be covered only until you are 25 or are finished full-time studies, whichever happens first.</p><p>There are four types of drug insurance:</p><ol><li>Private insurance: This might be available through your own employment, through your enrollment in post-secondary education, or through your parent’s work if you are a student until you are 25 years of age.</li><li>Trillium Drug Insurance Program: This is a program of the Ontario Government that pays for medications. Your contribution is variable, depending on how much money you make. You will need to file income tax forms every year to stay qualified for this.</li><li>Ontario Drug Benefits through Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) or Ontario Works (OW). If you receive social assistance, talk to your Ministry of Community and Social Services case worker.</li><li>Temporary, emergency programs: There is always a way to pay for medications through drug insurance or temporary programs, while you’re waiting to get long-term insurance.</li></ol><p>If you need to apply for government funding for medications, you will need to show you qualify every year by filing an annual income tax return. It is a good idea to get familiar with income tax returns, so start doing these when you are 16.</p><p> <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/services/taxes/income-tax/personal-income-tax/doing-your-taxes.html">This website from the Canadian Revenue Agency</a> has more information about how to complete your tax return. You can also talk to your parents about how to file your income tax.</p><h2>Transition programs</h2><p>Some hospitals have special staff, clinics or programs that help teenagers develop the skills they need to prepare for a health-care transition. Your paediatric team may be able to arrange for you to meet your new adult provider, or have a tour of the clinic, before your first appointment. You may also be able to arrange for a tour of your new clinic or hospital yourself.</p><h2>Continued care is important</h2><p>Once you turn 18, you can no longer be admitted to paediatric care overnight or use the emergency services. Talk to your health-care team about the best place to go for urgent care or emergencies while making your transition.</p><p>People with chronic health conditions stay healthier if they have lifelong follow up. It is important to keep in contact with your primary-care provider regularly (at least once a year—even when you are healthy).</p><p>You may also have questions about becoming an adult with a chronic condition.</p><p>Some common concerns are:</p><ul><li>Relationships and sex</li><li>Family planning: contraception, planning a healthy pregnancy/fathering a child, parenting options</li><li>Health insurance (to pay for medications and personal care supplies)</li><li> <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3918&language=English">Post-secondary education</a></li><li> <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3919&language=English">Working</a></li><li> <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3920&language=English">Managing finances (income supports, funding)</a></li><li> <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3922&language=English">Moving out on your own</a></li><li> <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3921&language=English">Where to get community supports and services</a></li></ul><p>These questions and concerns are normal. Discuss them with your health-care team.</p><h2>Final tips for transitioning to adult care</h2><h3>Be GLADD</h3><ul><li> <strong>G</strong>ive information — Know about your medical history and current medications. Tell your team what works best for you.</li><li> <strong>L</strong>isten to the suggestions — Your new team knows a lot about adult health care.</li><li> <strong>A</strong>sk questions — Write questions down before your visit so you don’t forget. If you don’t understand something, ask for an explanation. There are no silly questions. Get all the information you need.</li><li> <strong>D</strong>ecide on a plan — Choose a plan that is good for your health and works best with your lifestyle—for school, work and socially.</li><li> <strong>D</strong>o it — Get involved with your care! Take your medications and attend your medical appointments.</li></ul><p>If you are looking for help with transitioning to adult care, contact the Resource Navigation Service, located in the Social Work Department. It is open Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please let someone know you are there for assistance from the Resource Navigation Service and someone will be there to assist you.</p><p>If you would like to make an appointment, or have any questions about resources please email <a href="mailto:resource.navigation@sickkids.ca">resource.navigation@sickkids.ca</a> or call 416-813-6787 or 416-813-8548.</p><p> <strong>Healthcare Connect</strong> - <a href="http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/ms/healthcareconnect/public">www.health.gov.on.ca/en/ms/healthcareconnect/public</a><br>Phone: 1-800-445-1822<br> Helps Ontarians find a family health-care provider (physicians, nurse practitioners)</p><p> <strong>211 Ontario</strong> - <a href="http://www.211ontario.ca/">www.211ontario.ca</a><br>Phone: 211<br> Information and referral to community and social services</p><p> <strong>Got Transition.org</strong> - <a href="http://www.gottransition.org/">www.gottransition.org</a><br> Provides tools and resources on transition</p><p> <strong>AboutKidsHealth</strong> - <a href="http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/">www.aboutkidshealth.ca</a><br> Provides expert-reviewed information about everyday health and complex medical conditions</p><p> <strong>Easy for You to Say: Q&As for Teens Living with Chronic Illness or Disability (2012)</strong><br>Author: Miriam Kaufman, Firefly Books<br>Available at public libraries or through major booksellers</p><p> <strong>P4P Planning Network</strong> - <a href="http://www.planningnetwork.ca/">http://www.planningnetwork.ca</a><br> Resource network for families in Ontario who are assisting a person living with a disability</p><p> <strong>Community Networks of Specialized Care</strong> - <a href="http://www.community-networks.ca/">http://www.community-networks.ca/</a><br>Network that supports people with a developmental disability and mental health needs and/or challenging behaviour</p><h3>Kids Help Phone – <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">kidshelpphone.ca</a></h3><p>Phone: 1-800-668-6868<br>Kids Help Phone is a 24/7 e-mental health service offering free, confidential support to young people.</p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/12-tips-navigating-conversations-doctors/">12 tips for navigating conversations with doctors</a></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/ID%203916%20Trans%20to%20adult%20care.jpgHow to manage feelings of uncertainty Watch this video for tools to cope with uncertainty and unknowns about the future. This video can help you focus on what you can control right now.Teenshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vWMe3A-IKY