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What to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentWWhat to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentWhat to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentEnglishAdolescent;DevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)Pelvis;BodyReproductive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>If you’re sexually active, or thinking about becoming sexually active, you should make an appointment with your primary care provider to make sure you’re healthy. Find out what you need to know to prepare for that appointment.</p><div class="callout2"><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. After reading this article, please take 5 minutes to complete our Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey.</p> <button><a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">click here</a></button> </div><h2>Do I need a sexual health appointment?</h2><p>If you’ve had sex or are thinking about having sex in the near future, it’s a good idea to talk to your health-care provider to make sure you’re staying healthy, protected from sexually transmitted infections (STIs), know how to prevent pregnancy if relevant, and understand the concepts of consent. As you get older you should have regular sexual and reproductive health appointments to make sure you are staying healthy and safe.</p><p>The information on this page will give you an idea of what to expect, including:</p><ul><li>What consent is and why it’s important</li><li>What to expect from the health-care provider during the appointment</li><li>Asking questions during a sexual health appointment</li></ul><h2> What is consent?</h2><p>In a health-care setting, giving consent means you agree to have a specific procedure, test or treatment done. During a sexual and reproductive health appointment, your health-care provider should ask for your consent before touching or examining any part of your body, including your breasts or genitals. Consent can be given either verbally or in writing.</p><p>If at any point during the appointment you feel uncomfortable, you can withdraw, or take back, your consent. Tell your health-care provider if you do not feel comfortable. Remember, just because you gave your consent at the start of an appointment, that does not mean you have to have any procedure, test or treatment that makes you uncomfortable; you can always change your mind.</p><p>To learn more, read the article "Consent and capacity in health care". </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If you are sexually active or thinking about having sex, you should consider making an appointment with a health-care provider to make sure you are staying healthy and safe.</li><li>Anything you discuss at your appointment with your provider is confidential unless there are safety concerns. Treatment is also confidential (i.e., contraception and other treatments) and does not require parental consent.</li><li>Your health-care provider should ask for your consent before touching any part of your body. You can always withdraw your consent at any point if you don’t feel comfortable or safe during the appointment.</li><li>The health-care provider will review the 7Ps with you: Partners, practices, protection from STIs, past history of STIs, prevention of pregnancy, permission (consent), and personal identity (gender identity).</li><li>You will also be able to ask your health-care provider any questions you may have during the appointment.</li></ul><h2>Resources</h2><p>To find a sexual health clinic near you, visit: <a href="https://www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services">www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services</a></p><p>N Johnson; Canadian Paediatric Society, Adolescent Health Committee. Comprehensive sexual health assessments for adolescents. <em>Paediatr Child Health</em>. 2020; 25(8):551. (Abstract). <a href="https://cps.ca/documents/position/comprehensive-sexual-health-assessments-for-adolescents">https://cps.ca/documents/position/comprehensive-sexual-health-assessments-for-adolescents</a></p>

 

 

 

 

What to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointment3990.00000000000What to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentWhat to expect during a sexual and reproductive health appointmentWEnglishAdolescent;DevelopmentalTeen (13-18 years)Pelvis;BodyReproductive systemHealthy living and preventionTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<p>If you’re sexually active, or thinking about becoming sexually active, you should make an appointment with your primary care provider to make sure you’re healthy. Find out what you need to know to prepare for that appointment.</p><div class="callout2"><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. After reading this article, please take 5 minutes to complete our Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey.</p> <button><a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">click here</a></button> </div><h2>Do I need a sexual health appointment?</h2><p>If you’ve had sex or are thinking about having sex in the near future, it’s a good idea to talk to your health-care provider to make sure you’re staying healthy, protected from sexually transmitted infections (STIs), know how to prevent pregnancy if relevant, and understand the concepts of consent. As you get older you should have regular sexual and reproductive health appointments to make sure you are staying healthy and safe.</p><p>The information on this page will give you an idea of what to expect, including:</p><ul><li>What consent is and why it’s important</li><li>What to expect from the health-care provider during the appointment</li><li>Asking questions during a sexual health appointment</li></ul><h2> What is consent?</h2><p>In a health-care setting, giving consent means you agree to have a specific procedure, test or treatment done. During a sexual and reproductive health appointment, your health-care provider should ask for your consent before touching or examining any part of your body, including your breasts or genitals. Consent can be given either verbally or in writing.</p><p>If at any point during the appointment you feel uncomfortable, you can withdraw, or take back, your consent. Tell your health-care provider if you do not feel comfortable. Remember, just because you gave your consent at the start of an appointment, that does not mean you have to have any procedure, test or treatment that makes you uncomfortable; you can always change your mind.</p><p>To learn more, read the article "Consent and capacity in health care". </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If you are sexually active or thinking about having sex, you should consider making an appointment with a health-care provider to make sure you are staying healthy and safe.</li><li>Anything you discuss at your appointment with your provider is confidential unless there are safety concerns. Treatment is also confidential (i.e., contraception and other treatments) and does not require parental consent.</li><li>Your health-care provider should ask for your consent before touching any part of your body. You can always withdraw your consent at any point if you don’t feel comfortable or safe during the appointment.</li><li>The health-care provider will review the 7Ps with you: Partners, practices, protection from STIs, past history of STIs, prevention of pregnancy, permission (consent), and personal identity (gender identity).</li><li>You will also be able to ask your health-care provider any questions you may have during the appointment.</li></ul><h2>Can I bring my parent/guardian to my sexual and reproductive health appointment?</h2><p>It’s up to you whether you would like your parent/guardian to attend your appointment with you. Some teens may feel more comfortable if their parent/guardian is there, while others might not want their parent/guardian to know they are having this appointment. It is also okay to tell your parent/guardian about your appointment without having them present in the room. </p><p>If you choose not to have your parent/guardian there, your doctor will keep what you tell them, and any treatment you received, confidential (private) unless there are safety concerns. To learn more about confidentiality, take a look at this resource: What is confidentiality?</p><h2>What happens at a sexual and reproductive health appointment?</h2><p>Your health-care provider should review confidentiality and limits with you at the start of your appointment. If they don’t, you can ask them about their policy on confidentiality. For example, they should not discuss your health with anyone else, including your parent/guardian, without your permission/consent.</p><p>Your health-care provider will ask you several questions and may examine you to make sure you are healthy. If you have never had a sexual and reproductive health appointment before, you may feel nervous or unsure about what to expect. It’s important to remember that not all appointments will require an examination. </p><h2>The 7 P’s</h2><p>Your doctor should review the '7 Ps' with you. These include:</p><ul><li>Partners</li><li>Practices</li><li>Protection from STIs</li><li>Past history of STIs</li><li>Prevention of pregnancy</li><li>Permission (consent)</li><li>Personal identity (gender identity)</li></ul><h3>Partners</h3><p>Your health-care provider will ask you if you are currently having sex or if you have ever had sex. They will ask about any sexual partners you have had to assess your risk of STIs. They may ask you how many sexual partners you have had and the length of time you have been having sex with them.</p><h3>Practices</h3><p>Your health-care provider will ask you about the type of sex you’ve had (vaginal, anal, oral etc.). This will help them to determine which tests to perform, if any (e.g., STI testing, pregnancy testing). </p><h3>Protection from STIs</h3><p>Your health-care provider may ask you the following questions: </p><ul><li>Do you use protection against STIs (condoms)?</li><ul><li>If yes, what kind of protection do you use?</li><li>If no, why do you not use protection? </li></ul><li>How often do you use protection?</li><li>In what situations do you use protection?</li></ul><p>Depending on your answers to these questions, your health-care provider may tell you more about safe sex, what types of protection are available to you, and your/your partner’s risk for STIs. </p><p>They may also recommend that you be screened for STIs, even if you do not have symptoms (asymptomatic screening). This usually means you will need to provide a urine sample and have a blood test done. Your health-care provider may also need to do a urethral, cervical, vaginal or anal swab, depending on what they are testing you for. It is sometimes an option to obtain the swab yourself. They should explain each test to you clearly. If you do not understand why you are having a test done, ask your health-care provider to explain or provide more information!</p><h3>Past history of STIs</h3><p>Your health-care provider may ask you the following questions:</p><ul><li>Have you ever been diagnosed with an STI? When? How were you treated?</li><li>Has your partner(s) ever been diagnosed with an STI? Did they receive treatment?</li><li>Have you had any recurring symptoms of STIs or diagnoses of STIs? </li></ul><p>The answers to these questions will also help your health-care provider determine your current risk for STIs but also determine if you need to be tested or treated for STIs.</p><h3>Prevention of pregnancy</h3><p>Depending on your answers to previous questions, your health-care provider may ask you questions such as:</p><ul><li>Are you worried about getting pregnant/getting your partner pregnant?</li><li>Are you using contraception or birth control?</li><li>Do you need information on birth control?</li></ul><h3>Permission (consent)</h3><p>You and your health-care provider should have a conversation about consent and confidentiality, including the age of consent for sexual activity in Canada and what that means.</p><h3>Personal identity (gender)</h3><p>Your health-care provider may ask you questions about your sexual orientation and gender identity. They should not make any assumptions about identity, attraction or sexual behaviour, and they should not pass judgement on how you answer.</p><h2>Can I ask questions during a sexual health appointment?</h2><p>You will have the chance to ask your health-care provider about any concerns you may have. You may feel nervous or embarrassed to ask but remember, it is your health care provider’s job to answer your health questions and make sure you’re healthy and being responsible! The information you share, including questions and concerns, is confidential.</p><p>If you do not feel comfortable with your health-care provider or if you feel judged by them, you can call a local health clinic or health services hotline to ask for a referral. The most important thing is that you feel comfortable with your health-care provider and that you trust them.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p>To find a sexual health clinic near you, visit: <a href="https://www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services">www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services</a></p><p>N Johnson; Canadian Paediatric Society, Adolescent Health Committee. Comprehensive sexual health assessments for adolescents. <em>Paediatr Child Health</em>. 2020; 25(8):551. (Abstract). <a href="https://cps.ca/documents/position/comprehensive-sexual-health-assessments-for-adolescents">https://cps.ca/documents/position/comprehensive-sexual-health-assessments-for-adolescents</a></p>