AboutKidsHealth for Teens

 

 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)SSexually transmitted infections (STIs)Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)EnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)Body;PelvisNAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000063.40000000000001213.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Sexually transmitted infections are disease that are spread through sexual contact. Learn about the different types of STIs including signs, symptoms, testing and treatment, as well as how to prevent an STI. </p><div class="callout2"><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. After reading this article, please take 5 minutes to complete our Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey.</p> <button> <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">click here</a></button> </div><h2>What is a sexually transmitted infection (STI)?</h2><p>Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diseases that can spread from person to person through any sexual contact. Many STIs don’t have any obvious signs or symptoms at first. This is why it’s so important that you protect yourself and your partner(s) by using protection and getting tested regularly.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are spread from person to person through sexual contact.</li><li>You can prevent STIs by using protection such as condoms, discussing STIs and safe sex with your partner(s), asking your health-care provider about vaccines, and getting regularly tested.</li><li>If you have an STI, do not have sex until the infection is gone, and your health-care provider says that it is OK. </li><li>If you think you have an STI, make an appointment with a health-care provider right away so you can be tested and start treatment.</li></ul><h2>Resources</h2><p><a href="https://www.sexandu.ca/stis/">Sex & U</a></p><p><a href="https://youngwomenshealth.org/sexual-health-index/">Center for Young Women's Health</a></p>

 

 

 

 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)3989.00000000000Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)SEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)Body;PelvisNAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-10-19T04:00:00Z7.5000000000000063.40000000000001213.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Sexually transmitted infections are disease that are spread through sexual contact. Learn about the different types of STIs including signs, symptoms, testing and treatment, as well as how to prevent an STI. </p><div class="callout2"><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. After reading this article, please take 5 minutes to complete our Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey.</p> <button> <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">click here</a></button> </div><h2>What is a sexually transmitted infection (STI)?</h2><p>Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diseases that can spread from person to person through any sexual contact. Many STIs don’t have any obvious signs or symptoms at first. This is why it’s so important that you protect yourself and your partner(s) by using protection and getting tested regularly.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are spread from person to person through sexual contact.</li><li>You can prevent STIs by using protection such as condoms, discussing STIs and safe sex with your partner(s), asking your health-care provider about vaccines, and getting regularly tested.</li><li>If you have an STI, do not have sex until the infection is gone, and your health-care provider says that it is OK. </li><li>If you think you have an STI, make an appointment with a health-care provider right away so you can be tested and start treatment.</li></ul><h2>How can I prevent STIs?</h2><p>The best ways to prevent an STI are:</p><ul><li>Use <a href="/article?contentid=3988&language=english">protection such as condoms</a></li><li>Discuss STIs and safe sex with your partner(s) so that you can protect each other</li><li>Ask your health-care provider about getting vaccinated against hepatitis B and human papillomavirus (HPV)</li><li>Get tested regularly for STIs</li></ul><div class="caution"><p>If you have an STI, don’t have sex until the infection is gone, and your health-care provider says it’s OK. If the STI has no cure (such as herpes or HIV) make sure you always use protection.</p></div><h2>What do I do if I think I have an STI?</h2><p>If you think you might have an STI, contact your health-care provider. Or to find a sexual health clinic near you, visit the <a href="https://www.actioncanadashr.org/resources/services">Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights website</a>.</p><h2>What are the different types of STIs? </h2><p>The following table breaks down some of the more common types of STIs, including symptoms, testing and treatment options.</p><table class="akh-table" style="width:703px;"><thead><tr><th>STI</th><th>What is it?</th><th>Signs & symptoms</th><th>Testing</th><th>Treatment</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Chlamydia</td><td><p>Affects the cervix and urethra, and sometimes the rectum, throat and eyes.</p><p>Most common bacterial STI.</p><p>More common in female-bodied people than male-bodied people.</p></td><td><p>Most people with chlamydia have no symptoms at all</p><p>Discharge from penis or vagina</p><p>Vaginal bleeding after sex or between periods</p><p>Pain in the abdomen or lower back</p><p>Pain during sex</p><p>Itchy urethra</p><p>Pain or swelling in testicles</p><p>Pain or burning while urinating (peeing)</p></td><td><p>Urine sample </p><p>OR </p><p>Swab of cervix, urethra, vagina, rectum, nose, throat and/or eyes.</p></td><td><p>Antibiotic pills.</p><p>Should be retested 6 months after treatment.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Gonorrhea</td><td><p>Affects the cervix and urethra, and sometimes the rectum and throat.</p><p>Second most common bacterial STI.</p><p>Sometimes called 'the clap'.</p></td><td><p>Discharge from penis or vagina</p><p>Pain during sex</p><p>Pain in lower abdomen or pelvis</p><p>Vaginal bleeding after sex or between periods</p><p> Irregular periods</p><p>Pain or swelling in testicles</p><p>Pain or burning while urinating</p><p>May have no symptoms</p></td><td><p>Urine sample</p><p>OR</p><p>Swab of the infected area (penis, vagina, cervix, anus, throat, and/or eye).</p></td><td><p>Antibiotic pills and muscular injection.</p><p>Should be retested 6 months after treatment.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Syphilis</td><td><p>Caused by bacteria.</p><p>Rare in Canada but rates of cases have been increasing.</p></td><td><p></p><p>Syphilis has 4 stages of symptoms: </p><p>Primary – a painless sore at the affected area.</p><p>Secondary – flu-like symptoms and rash developing 3 weeks to 6 months after infection.</p><p>Latent – syphilis is untreated, and generally has no symptoms; this phase can continue for years.</p><p>Tertiary – 10-30 years after infection; damage to organs.</p></td><td><p>Swab of affected area (primary syphilis only).</p><p>Blood test.</p></td><td><p>Penicillin, or other antibiotics.</p><p>Early treatment is important as damage caused by syphilis can’t be reversed.</p></td></tr><tr><td>HPV and genital warts</td><td><p>Human papillomavirus is the most common STI.</p><p>Highest rates are in youth 15-24 years old.</p><p>Some types of HPV can cause genital warts and others can cause cancer if left untreated.</p><p>A vaccine is available to prevent HPV.</p></td><td><p>Warts that look like tiny bumps on the vagina, anus, cervix or inside of the thigh; may be small or hard to see.</p><p>Pain or bleeding.</p><p>May not have any symptoms at all.</p></td><td><p>Visual exam.</p><p>Pap test (only for those over age 25).</p></td><td><p>Watching the warts to see if they go away.</p><p>Wart removal by a health-care professional <strong>(never use over-the-counter wart medicine on genital warts unless prescribed by a health-care professional)</strong>.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Trichomoniasis</td><td><p>Common infection affecting the vulva, vagina, cervix, urethra, bladder, penis.</p></td><td><p>Discharge or odor from the vagina or penis.</p><p>Pain or burning while peeing.</p><p>Pain during sex.</p><p>Itchiness.</p></td><td><p>Swab of affected area.</p></td><td><p>Antibiotics.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Hepatitis B</td><td><p>A virus that affects the liver.</p><p>A vaccine is available to prevent Hepatitis B.</p></td><td><p>Most people do not have signs of hepatitis B.</p><p>Up to 8 weeks after exposure, you may have flu-like symptoms.</p></td><td><p>Blood test.</p></td><td><p>There is no cure for hepatitis B, but most people recover and have no symptoms after 6 months.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Hepatitis C</td><td><p>A virus that affects the liver.</p></td><td><p>Acute:</p><p>Flu-like symptoms</p><p>Decreased appetite, weight loss</p><p>Jaundice</p><p>Rash</p><p>Dark urine or clay-coloured stool</p><p>Chronic: </p><p>Jaundice</p><p>Swelling of the abdomen (belly)</p><p>Blood in stool and vomit</p><p>Interrupted sleep</p><p>Depression</p><p>Weight loss</p><p>Itchy skin</p><p>Brain disease</p></td><td><p>Blood test</p></td><td><p>Combination of medications to treat the hepatitis C infection.</p><p>Prevent liver damage.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Herpes</td><td><p>There are 2 types of herpes:</p><p>HSV-1 more commonly causes oral infection (cold sores, fever blisters around the mouth)</p><p>HSV-2 more commonly causes genital herpes with lesions around the vulva, vagina, cervix, anus and penis</p><p>Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 can infect both the mouth and the genitals.</p><p>Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 can be spread by kissing, touching, oral sex, unprotected vaginal or anal sex.</p></td><td><p>Primary infection:</p><p>Flu-like symptoms</p><p>Cold sore or fever blister around the nose, lips or in the mouth</p><p>Pain while peeing</p><p>Genital pain</p><p>Genital blisters</p><p>Genital ulcers</p><p>Recurrent infection:</p><p>Tingling, itching or burning</p><p>Sores inside the mouth or on the lips, vulva, vagina, or penis</p></td><td><p>Swab of a lesion/sore.</p></td><td><p>Medication to decrease the length and severity of an outbreak.</p><p>There is no cure for herpes.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Pubic lice</td><td><p>Small insects that nest in pubic hair.</p><p>Sometimes referred to as 'crabs' because of their appearance.</p><p>Can also be found in the eyebrows, armpit hair, beards and mustaches.</p></td><td><p>Itching, redness or irritation at the affected area.</p></td><td><p>Physical exam of the infected area by a health-care professional.</p> <br> </td><td><p>Medicated creams, lotions, or shampoos to apply to the affected area.</p></td></tr><tr><td>Scabies</td><td><p>Mites that burrow under the skin to lay eggs.</p></td><td><p>Rash or bumps, particularly in a line.</p><p>Itching.</p></td><td><p>Physical exam of the infected area by a health-care professional.</p><p>Scraping of the rash to look for mites, fecal matter of mites, or mite eggs under a microscope.</p></td><td><p>Scabicide creams or lotions to apply to the affected area.</p></td></tr><tr><td>HIV</td><td><p>Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) attacks the immune system.</p><p>Can develop into AIDS.</p></td><td><p>Mild flu-like symptoms develop 2-4 weeks after exposure then disappear.</p><p>After several years (usually after at least 10 years), symptoms can include:</p><p>Flu-like symptoms </p><p>Enlarged lymph nodes </p><p>Shortness of breath or dry cough </p><p>Loss of vision </p><p>Lesions on skin </p><p>Anemia </p><p>Severe shingles or oral or genital ulcers </p><p>In rare cases, some people do not have any symptoms (chronic asymptomatic HIV).</p></td><td><p>Blood work.</p></td><td><p>Antiretroviral therapy to slow the progression of HIV.</p></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Resources</h2><p><a href="https://www.sexandu.ca/stis/">Sex & U</a></p><p><a href="https://youngwomenshealth.org/sexual-health-index/">Center for Young Women's Health</a></p>