AboutKidsHealth for Teens

 

 

TransitioningTTransitioningTransitioningEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-06-21T04:00:00Z11.300000000000038.8000000000000931.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn more about the options for transitioning and helpful resources for transgender youth and their families.</p><p>Transitioning is the process that many <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3961&language=English">transgender people</a> go through to reflect and affirm their gender identity. This can include transitioning socially, legally, medically, or a combination. People who transition are typically on a journey to becoming visibly and socially recognizable as being of a different gender from what they were assigned at birth, but transgender people can express their gender identities in many different ways. How long someone takes to transition can also vary: some people transition slowly and some transition very quickly.</p><h3>What is gender dysphoria?</h3><p>People who are transgender and transitioning may have gender dysphoria. This is a diagnosis used by health-care providers to describe the distress, unhappiness and anxiety that transgender people may feel about the mismatch between the sex they were assigned at birth and their gender identity.</p><p>A person will need to be formally diagnosed with gender dysphoria in order to receive medical treatment to help them transition.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Transitioning is the process that many transgender people go through to reflect and affirm their gender identity.</li><li>There are two different ways to transition: socially and medically.</li><li>Social transitioning is when you change aspects of your appearance, behaviour or way of interacting with others (e.g., name, pronouns) to affirm your gender identity. You can also transition legally by changing your name and/or sex designation on legal documents.</li><li>Medical transitioning is when you take medications and/or have surgery to affirm your gender identity.</li><li>A person does not have to transition in order to be considered transgender. It is important to remember that not all transgender people wish to change their bodies or the ways in which they express parts of their gender.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>The <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinics/transgender-youth-clinic/">SickKids Transgender Youth Clinic (TYC)</a> provides information, options and care to youth experiencing gender dysphoria, which includes assessment and treatment planning. The clinic takes an affirming approach to gender identity and care.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p><a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3964&language=English">Gender and identity: Support and resources</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Sex&U. <em>The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.sexandu.ca/">https://www.sexandu.ca/</a>.</p><p>Gender. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/trans-basics/gender">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/trans-basics/gender</a>.</p><p>Puberty Blockers for Youth. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/child-youth/affirmation-transition/medical-affirmation-transition/puberty-blockers-for-youth">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/child-youth/affirmation-transition/medical-affirmation-transition/puberty-blockers-for-youth</a>.</p><p>Binding, Packing, Tucking & Padding. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/care-support/transitioning/bind-pack-tuck-pad">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/care-support/transitioning/bind-pack-tuck-pad</a>.</p><p>Transgender Identities. <em>Planned Parenthood</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/gender-identity/transgender">https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/gender-identity/transgender</a>.<br></p>

 

 

 

 

Transitioning3962.00000000000TransitioningTransitioningTEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-06-21T04:00:00Z11.300000000000038.8000000000000931.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn more about the options for transitioning and helpful resources for transgender youth and their families.</p><p>Transitioning is the process that many <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3961&language=English">transgender people</a> go through to reflect and affirm their gender identity. This can include transitioning socially, legally, medically, or a combination. People who transition are typically on a journey to becoming visibly and socially recognizable as being of a different gender from what they were assigned at birth, but transgender people can express their gender identities in many different ways. How long someone takes to transition can also vary: some people transition slowly and some transition very quickly.</p><h3>What is gender dysphoria?</h3><p>People who are transgender and transitioning may have gender dysphoria. This is a diagnosis used by health-care providers to describe the distress, unhappiness and anxiety that transgender people may feel about the mismatch between the sex they were assigned at birth and their gender identity.</p><p>A person will need to be formally diagnosed with gender dysphoria in order to receive medical treatment to help them transition.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Transitioning is the process that many transgender people go through to reflect and affirm their gender identity.</li><li>There are two different ways to transition: socially and medically.</li><li>Social transitioning is when you change aspects of your appearance, behaviour or way of interacting with others (e.g., name, pronouns) to affirm your gender identity. You can also transition legally by changing your name and/or sex designation on legal documents.</li><li>Medical transitioning is when you take medications and/or have surgery to affirm your gender identity.</li><li>A person does not have to transition in order to be considered transgender. It is important to remember that not all transgender people wish to change their bodies or the ways in which they express parts of their gender.</li></ul><h2>Social transition</h2><p>Social transitioning is when you change aspects of your appearance, behaviour or way of interacting with others to affirm your gender identity. This may include:</p><ul><li>coming out as transgender to your friends and family</li><li>asking to be called by a different name</li><li>asking to be referred to by the <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3963&language=English">pronouns</a> that match your gender identity (e.g., she/her, he/him, they/them)</li><li>dressing or wearing your hair in ways that demonstrate your gender identity</li><li>modifying your tone of voice</li><li>using non-surgical options to modify your body (e.g., <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/care-support/transitioning/bind-pack-tuck-pad">binding, packing, tucking, padding</a>)</li></ul><h2>Legal transition</h2><p>In some countries, including Canada, you can also transition legally by changing your name and/or sex designation on documents like your birth certificate, driver’s license, passport, social insurance number (SIN) and health card. If you are under the legal age of adulthood, you may need to get permission from your parents or legal guardians before legally transitioning.</p><h2>Medical transition</h2><p>Medical transitioning is when you take medications and/or have surgery to affirm your gender identity. This may include:</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/child-youth/affirmation-transition/medical-affirmation-transition/puberty-blockers-for-youth">hormone blockers</a>, to delay the progression of puberty until you are old enough to make more serious medical decisions about your body</li><li>gender-affirming hormones, to gain either masculine characteristics or feminine characteristics</li><ul><li>masculinizing hormones usually deepen the voice, increase facial and body hair, stop menstruation, increase muscle growth and redistribute fat away from the hips and breasts</li><li>feminizing hormones usually decrease facial and body hair, decrease muscle growth, promote the growth of breasts and redistribute fat towards the hips and breasts</li></ul><li>laser hair removal</li><li>chest reconstruction (removal of breast tissue) or augmentation (breast implants)</li><li>tracheal shave (making the Adam’s apple smaller)</li><li>facial feminization surgery (altering the face to create feminine facial features)</li><li>removal of female reproductive organs (ovaries and uterus) or male reproductive organs (testes)</li><li>genital reconstruction (creating a penis or vagina using the genitals you were born with)</li></ul><h2>Does everyone who is transgender decide to transition?</h2><p>Every person who chooses to transition does so in their own way. Some people choose to only transition socially, and some people transition both socially and medically. A person does not have to transition in order to be considered transgender—each individual lives and experiences their identity differently. Transitioning can sometimes be a long, expensive and permanent process; so, deciding to undergo certain aspects of transitioning can be difficult. It is also important to remember that not all transgender people wish to change their bodies or the ways in which they express parts of their gender.</p><h2>What does it mean to “pass”?</h2><p>Passing is a term for when a transgender person is perceived as a cisgender person instead of the sex they were assigned at birth. Passing can be important for many transgender people to alleviate their gender dysphoria and to affirm their gender identity. Passing can also sometimes protect a transgender person from violence, prejudice and harassment by allowing them to go unnoticed by people who are unaccepting. However, the term “passing” can be seen very negatively. It can falsely imply that the goal of transitioning is to be seen as a cisgender person and that some people’s gender presentation is more real than others. It is important to remember that many transgender people are not trying to “pass” as cisgender and are comfortable as they are.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>The <a href="https://www.sickkids.ca/en/care-services/clinics/transgender-youth-clinic/">SickKids Transgender Youth Clinic (TYC)</a> provides information, options and care to youth experiencing gender dysphoria, which includes assessment and treatment planning. The clinic takes an affirming approach to gender identity and care.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p><a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3964&language=English">Gender and identity: Support and resources</a></p><h2>References</h2><p>Sex&U. <em>The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.sexandu.ca/">https://www.sexandu.ca/</a>.</p><p>Gender. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/trans-basics/gender">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/trans-basics/gender</a>.</p><p>Puberty Blockers for Youth. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/child-youth/affirmation-transition/medical-affirmation-transition/puberty-blockers-for-youth">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/child-youth/affirmation-transition/medical-affirmation-transition/puberty-blockers-for-youth</a>.</p><p>Binding, Packing, Tucking & Padding. <em>Trans Care BC</em>. Retrieved from <a href="http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/care-support/transitioning/bind-pack-tuck-pad">http://www.phsa.ca/transcarebc/care-support/transitioning/bind-pack-tuck-pad</a>.</p><p>Transgender Identities. <em>Planned Parenthood</em>. Retrieved from <a href="https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/gender-identity/transgender">https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/gender-identity/transgender</a>.<br></p>