AboutKidsHealth for Teens

 

 

Transitioning through health care as a teenager: TimelineTTransitioning through health care as a teenager: TimelineTransitioning through health care as a teenager: TimelineEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-03-03T05:00:00Z9.0000000000000055.4000000000000908.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Recommendations for navigating your way through the health-care system as a teenager and gaining independence in managing your own health care. </p><p>As you get older, you will begin taking more responsibility for your own health care in preparation for <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3916&language=English">transitioning to the adult health-care system</a>. Transition means moving from one life stage to another. It involves change and adapting to change, which can be exciting but sometimes scary. The best way to deal with any transition is to plan ahead and be prepared. Preparing for a transition involves learning, in advance, the skills that you will need to succeed in a new life stage.</p><p>Below are some recommendations for navigating your way through the health-care system as a teenager and gaining independence in managing your own health care.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Find people you can trust to talk to about your condition and the changes you are going through as a teenager.</li><li>Participate in activities at school and in your community, hang out with friends and decide with whom you would like to disclose your condition.</li><li>Develop health-care routines and look for support in your community.</li><li>Learn about different higher education and career opportunities and any accommodations available for your condition.</li><li>Increase your knowledge of your condition and take part in health-care discussions with your health-care team.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If you are looking for help with transitioning to adult care, contact the Resource Navigation Service, located in the Social Work Department. It is open Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please let someone know you are there for assistance from the Resource Navigation Service and someone will be there to assist you.</p><p>If you would like to make an appointment, or have any questions about resources please email <a href="mailto:resource.navigation@sickkids.ca">resource.navigation@sickkids.ca</a> or call 416-813-6787 or 416-813-8548.</p>

 

 

 

 

Transitioning through health care as a teenager: Timeline3917.00000000000Transitioning through health care as a teenager: TimelineTransitioning through health care as a teenager: TimelineTEnglishAdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANASupport, services and resourcesTeen (13-18 years)NA2021-03-03T05:00:00Z9.0000000000000055.4000000000000908.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Recommendations for navigating your way through the health-care system as a teenager and gaining independence in managing your own health care. </p><p>As you get older, you will begin taking more responsibility for your own health care in preparation for <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3916&language=English">transitioning to the adult health-care system</a>. Transition means moving from one life stage to another. It involves change and adapting to change, which can be exciting but sometimes scary. The best way to deal with any transition is to plan ahead and be prepared. Preparing for a transition involves learning, in advance, the skills that you will need to succeed in a new life stage.</p><p>Below are some recommendations for navigating your way through the health-care system as a teenager and gaining independence in managing your own health care.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Find people you can trust to talk to about your condition and the changes you are going through as a teenager.</li><li>Participate in activities at school and in your community, hang out with friends and decide with whom you would like to disclose your condition.</li><li>Develop health-care routines and look for support in your community.</li><li>Learn about different higher education and career opportunities and any accommodations available for your condition.</li><li>Increase your knowledge of your condition and take part in health-care discussions with your health-care team.</li></ul><h2>12 to 15 years of age</h2><h3>General</h3><ul><li>Ask questions, talk about your needs and how you feel about your condition with your parents and health-care providers.</li><li>Talk about body changes and sexuality with someone you trust. Look into what the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/AdolescentMedicine/Programs/index.html">Teen Clinic at SickKids</a> has to offer you.</li><li>Find role models you can relate to and look up to.</li><li>Find people you can trust to help you learn to manage your condition.</li><li>Practice <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3920&language=English">budgeting and banking skills</a>.</li></ul><h3>Social</h3><ul><li>Join teams and clubs at school or get involved in activities such as camps and community programs.</li><li>Think about with whom you would like to share the details of your condition.</li><li>Hang out with friends.</li><li>Learn to plan ahead for being away from home by preparing any medication or equipment you might need to take with you.</li></ul><h3>Self-care</h3><ul><li>Set up your own routines, such as taking medications and telling your parents when you are running out.</li><li>Keep track of your prescriptions, test results, procedures, and appointments with help from your parents/guardians and your health-care team.</li><li>Learn about your community and find resources related to your condition.</li><li>Thinking about driving? Talk to your health-care team about any special considerations.</li></ul><h3>Education</h3><ul><li>Learn and practice explaining your medical condition to teachers, camp counsellors and nurses who need to know.</li><li>Develop a three-sentence summary, which includes the following information:</li><ul><li> <strong>Sentence 1:</strong> Age, diagnosis, and brief health history</li><li> <strong>Sentence 2:</strong> Your treatment plan thus far</li><li> <strong>Sentence 3:</strong> Questions or concerns to raise during the visit</li></ul><li>Talk about career interests and begin to set goals for after high school.</li><li>Take part in meetings about your education.</li><li>Get to know your school guidance counsellor.</li></ul><h3>Medical</h3><ul><li>Increase your knowledge of your condition and understand reasons for tests, procedures and medications.</li><li>Ask for private time with your health-care provider for part of your visit. Prepare questions and concerns you want to discuss.</li><li>Talk with your health-care team about birth control, drugs, alcohol, and changes related to your condition as you grow.</li><li>Discuss your future care in the adult health system.</li></ul><h2>16 years and up</h2><h3>General</h3><ul><li>Think of yourself as a role model and a mentor to younger children.</li><li>Learn about the impact of your condition on sexual health and reproduction (for example, sexually transmitted infections, protection and genetics).</li><li>Celebrate your “graduation” to adult care.</li><li>Ask for your SickKids graduation certificate.</li></ul><h3>Social</h3><ul><li>Look for young adult <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3921&language=English">support groups in the community</a>.</li><li>Continue to participate in activities at school and in your community.</li><li>If you are dating, decide when you are ready to talk about your health condition with your partner.</li></ul><h3>Self-care</h3><ul><li>Take charge of preparing and taking any medications or treatments on your own.</li><li>Plan ahead to fit your daily care into your schedule so you can hang out with friends, participate in sports and clubs, and attend school.</li><li>Keep track of your appointments with an agenda or your cell phone.</li></ul><h3>Education</h3><ul><li>Look for volunteer or part-time <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3919&language=English">job opportunities</a>.</li><li>Go for career counselling, shadow someone at their job, attend a job fair.</li><li>Speak to your health-care team about scholarships that may be available through your program.</li><li> <a href="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=3918&language=English">Going to college or university?</a> Register with the Office of Special Accommodations/Disability Office/Access Centre on campus.</li></ul><h3>Medical</h3><ul><li>Be able to explain your condition and special health-care needs to others.</li><li>Take part in health-care discussions with your health-care team.</li><li>Make a plan for how your medication and treatments will be paid for in the future, as some insurance plans or payment programs end at age 18.</li><li>Visit an adult care facility and connect with others who have already made the transition to adult care.</li><li>Know your prognosis and future care plans.</li></ul><h2>We want to hear from you!</h2><p>AboutKidsHealth is trying to improve the information and education we provide young people (aged 12-18) and families through our website. Please take 5 minutes to complete our <a class="redcap-survey" href="https://surveys.sickkids.ca/surveys/?s=XHD3EK3XD4">Adolsecent Health Learning Hub survey</a>.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If you are looking for help with transitioning to adult care, contact the Resource Navigation Service, located in the Social Work Department. It is open Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please let someone know you are there for assistance from the Resource Navigation Service and someone will be there to assist you.</p><p>If you would like to make an appointment, or have any questions about resources please email <a href="mailto:resource.navigation@sickkids.ca">resource.navigation@sickkids.ca</a> or call 416-813-6787 or 416-813-8548.</p>