AboutKidsHealth for Teens

 

 

Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): OverviewAAvoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): OverviewAvoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): OverviewEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00Z8.2000000000000061.3000000000000532.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>What is avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder?</h2><p>Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, or ARFID for short, is an eating disorder that occurs when a child or teen doesn’t eat enough to meet their energy or nutritional needs. This is not done to try to manage their weight. Usually, they aren’t especially worried about how their body looks. </p><p>Instead, they avoid foods due to worries about vomiting or choking or dislike of certain food textures, smells or tastes. Because of their problems with eating, they may lose weight or not grow as expected. </p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>SickKids has an eating disorder program that treats children and teens who are struggling with symptoms of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. For more information on our program visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/programs/eating%20disorders%20program/eating-disorders-program.html">www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/eating-disorders-program</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em><a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><h2>References</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>
Trouble d’alimentation sélective et/ou d’évitement (ARFID): présentation généraleTTrouble d’alimentation sélective et/ou d’évitement (ARFID): présentation généraleAvoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): OverviewFrenchAdolescent;PsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Qu’est-ce que le trouble d’alimentation sélective et/ou d’évitement?</h2><p>Le trouble d’alimentation sélective et/ou d’évitement (ARFID pour avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder) est un trouble de l’alimentation caractérisé par le fait qu’un enfant ou un adolescent ne s’alimente pas suffisamment pour satisfaire ses besoins énergétiques ou nutritionnels. Ils ne le font pas dans le but de contrôler leur poids et, habituellement, ils ne s’inquiètent pas trop de leur apparence physique.</p><p>Ils évitent plutôt les aliments parce qu’ils ont peur de vomir ou de s’étouffer ou parce qu’ils ont une aversion envers la texture, l’odeur ou le goût de certains aliments. Ces problèmes peuvent entraîner une perte de poids ou retarder la croissance.</p><h2>À l’hôpital SickKids</h2><p>L’hôpital SickKids offre un programme de traitement pour les enfants et les adolescents souffrant de troubles alimentaires comme l’anorexie, la boulimie et le trouble d’alimentation sélective et/ou d’évitement. Pour plus de renseignements sur ce programme, visite la page : <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/programs/eating%20disorders%20program/eating-disorders-program.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/programs/eating-disorders-program.html</a> (disponible uniquement en anglais).<br></p><h2>Ressources</h2><p>(Disponibles uniquement en anglais)</p><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em> <a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><h2>Références</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>

 

 

 

 

Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): Overview3789.00000000000Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): OverviewAvoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): OverviewAEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00Z8.2000000000000061.3000000000000532.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>What is avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder?</h2><p>Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, or ARFID for short, is an eating disorder that occurs when a child or teen doesn’t eat enough to meet their energy or nutritional needs. This is not done to try to manage their weight. Usually, they aren’t especially worried about how their body looks. </p><p>Instead, they avoid foods due to worries about vomiting or choking or dislike of certain food textures, smells or tastes. Because of their problems with eating, they may lose weight or not grow as expected. </p><h2>What the signs and symptoms of ARFID? </h2><p>Children and teens struggling with ARFID may worry a lot about vomiting or choking or may not know exactly why they can’t eat. Sometimes they may feel like there’s something wrong with the food, especially how it feels in their mouth. </p><h3>Behavioural signs of ARFID</h3><p>Common behavioural signs include: </p><ul><li>suddenly refusing to eat foods that they once enjoyed</li><li>fear of choking on or vomiting from certain foods </li><li>losing appetite for no known reason</li><li>eating very slowly </li><li>difficulty eating meals with family or friends</li></ul><p>Someone with ARFID does not usually worry about calories or specific food groups. Once better, they can eat the foods they have always eaten.</p><h3>Physical signs of ARFID</h3><p>Common physical signs include:</p><ul><li>losing weight or no longer gaining weight</li><li>showing signs of malnutrition such as:</li><ul><li>feeling cold all the time</li><li>dizziness</li><li>low energy</li><li>changes in how the heart works</li></ul></ul><h2>How common is ARFID?</h2><p>ARFID is a fairly new diagnosis, so there is not enough information to say how common it is in males and females.</p><h2>What causes ARFID?</h2><p>In terms of causes, psychological factors play a part. ARFID is more likely to occur if someone has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, an anxiety disorder or depression in the past.</p><h2>How is ARFID diagnosed?</h2><p>There is no specific medical test to diagnose an eating disorder such as ARFID. Instead, a doctor will arrive at a diagnosis after asking you questions and examining you. </p><p>The doctor will usually ask about your eating and body image (how you feel about your body) and may check your weight, blood pressure and heart rate. They may also order blood tests to check your levels of sodium or potassium to see if you are at risk of the complications of an eating disorder, such as dizziness, weakness or fatigue. They will also often order an ECG, a test that looks at how your heart is working.</p><h2>When to see a doctor about ARFID</h2><p>It’s important to see a doctor if you:</p><ul><li>have stopped growing </li><li>are losing weight and finding it hard to eat enough food<br></li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>SickKids has an eating disorder program that treats children and teens who are struggling with symptoms of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. For more information on our program visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/programs/eating%20disorders%20program/eating-disorders-program.html">www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/eating-disorders-program</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em><a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><h2>References</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>