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Anorexia nervosa: OverviewAAnorexia nervosa: OverviewAnorexia nervosa: OverviewEnglishPsychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00Z10.300000000000052.2000000000000858.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental health disorder that has both physical and psychological consequences. Learn about the signs and symptoms, risk factors and treatment for AN.</p><h2>What is anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a mental health condition where a person feels so unhappy with their weight or is so worried about gaining weight that they diet, exercise or use other weight loss methods in a dangerously unhealthy way.</p><p>The body can develop many problems when it does not get enough food. People with anorexia nervosa can also develop anxiety and depression. But, with treatment, both the physical and psychological effects of starvation can be reversed.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder and mental health condition that involves having a distorted body image and under-eating to maintain an unhealthy low body weight.</li><li>It is a very serious condition and has one of the highest death rates of all mental health conditions.</li><li>Anorexia nervosa arises from a mix of genetics, stressful life events and psychological and social factors.</li><li>Anorexia nervosa often starts in teens aged 14 to 18 years, but can happen in younger children and occasionally in older people.</li><li>Often people struggling with an eating disorder do not feel that there is a problem, even though their health is affected.</li></ul><h2>What are the signs and symptoms of anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>People struggling with AN fear becoming fat and often think they are too big even after losing weight or hearing from other people that they don’t need to lose weight. </p><p>When someone has AN they may not want to share how they are feeling. However, AN has some standard recognizable signs and symptoms. </p><div class="symptoms-container" id="symp-anorexia"> <a href="#" class="symp-fullscreen"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/A_Landing_screen_mobile.png" alt="" /></a> <a href="#" class="symp-close-full material-icons pull-right">close</a> <div class="instruction-container"><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL</span></div><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL</span></div><div class="anim-instructions"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/SpeechBubbles_Anorexia.png" alt="" /> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL </span> <button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Avoiding family meals</span> <p>When someone has anorexia, they often skip meals and make excuses to avoid eating with others, especially their family. They may say they have already eaten or arrange other activities during mealtimes.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia1_avoidingMeals.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Limiting food choices</span> <p>Someone with anorexia may pay very close attention to the food they eat. They might eat only low-calorie food, cut out food groups and have trouble being flexible.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia2_limitingFoodChoices.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Wearing baggy clothes</span> <p>A person with anorexia may wear baggy clothes, or many layers of clothing, to hide their weight loss from family and friends.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia5_baggyClothes.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Irritability</span> <p>Because their brains lack nutrients, someone with anorexia might not think clearly. They may become irritable, have mood swings and obsessive thoughts or be rigid about how to do things.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia6_irritability.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Wanting to cook but not eat meals</span> <p>Someone with anorexia may spend more time collecting and trying new recipes but rarely eating what they prepare. Or they may become more particular about which groceries they want.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia9_cookNotEat.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button></div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL </span> <button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Weight loss or failing to gain weight </span> <p>Teens should grow and gain weight as they get older. When they stop growing, they should maintain their weight within a healthy range. Anorexia can cause these changes to slow down, stop or even reverse.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia4_weightLossORnoGain.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Feeling cold all the time</span> <p>When someone has anorexia they have reduced blood flow around the body. As a result, they may feel cold when most people feel comfortable and may wear warmer clothes than expected for the weather.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia3_feelingColdAlways.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Low energy and dizziness</span> <p>Because of their lower calorie intake, someone with anorexia usually lacks nutrition and may not drink enough fluids. They have very little energy and may feel tired or sluggish and feel faint.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia8_lowEnergyDizzy.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Unusual hair loss and growth </span> <p>A person with anorexia may notice unusual hair loss, for instance while washing their hair. However, in an effort to keep warm, they might also grow more body hair.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia7_hairLoss.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button></div></div><h3 class="main-title">ANOREXIA <span class="symp-subtitle">Common Signs</span></h3></div><h3>Physical signs of anorexia nervosa</h3><p>Physical signs include:</p><ul><li>not growing in a way that teens are expected to</li><li>losing weight or failing to gain weight</li><li>feeling cold all the time</li><li>feeling dizzy</li><li>lacking energy</li><li>regular constipation</li><li>irregular or missed periods </li><li>more body hair and/or loss of head hair </li><li>potentially dangerous changes in heart rate that could lead to death</li></ul><h3>Behavioural and emotional signs of anorexia nervosa</h3><p>Behavioural and emotional signs include:</p><ul><li>denying weight loss or not feeling that it’s a problem</li><li>not wanting to eat with others</li><li>wanting to eat only certain types of food or cutting out whole food groups</li><li>becoming more interested in food – going online to sites that focus on food or cooking for others – but not always wanting to eat the food</li><li>wearing baggy clothing</li><li>experiencing mood swings, including increased irritability, sadness and anxiety</li></ul><h2>How common is anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>About one to two in 100 females will develop AN. Research shows that it affects boys as well, but the exact number of males who have it is not well known.</p><h2>What causes anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>AN often starts from age 14 to 18 years, but it can happen in younger children and occasionally in older people. The exact causes of AN are unknown, but they often involve a mixture of genetics, stressful life events and psychological and social factors.</p><h3>Genetics</h3><p>It is very common for someone who develops AN to have other family members who have struggled with the same condition or with anxiety disorders.</p><h3>Stressful life events</h3><p>A person may develop AN after experiencing stress or a <a href="/Article?contentid=3781&language=English">trauma</a>. The stress or trauma may cause them to feel out of control, so they may turn to their eating pattern as something they can control instead. </p><h3>Psychological factors</h3><p>There is some evidence to suggest that people who are obsessive (focus a lot on details) or perfectionistic are at risk of developing AN. People who have a hard time naming their emotions can also be at risk.</p><h3>Social factors</h3><p>Some common social factors of AN include peer pressure to fit in, regular dieting and engagement with media that focus on thin bodies. Taking part in sports that have a focus on a certain body type, such as gymnastics or ballet, may be also increase the risk of developing AN. </p><h2>How is anorexia nervosa diagnosed?</h2><p>There is no specific medical test to diagnose an eating disorder such as AN. Instead, a doctor will arrive at a diagnosis after asking you questions and examining you. The doctor will usually ask about your eating and body image (how you feel about your body) and will check your weight, blood pressure and heart rate. They may also order blood tests to check your levels of sodium or potassium to see if you are at risk of any complications of an eating disorder, such as dizziness, weakness or fatigue. They will also often order an ECG, a test that looks at how your heart is working.</p><h2>When to see a doctor about anorexia nervosa</h2><p>People with AN often don’t feel there is a problem, so they may not go to the doctor until things are very serious. </p><p>It’s important to see a doctor if: </p><ul><li>you notice that you’re starting to fear eating or weight gain</li><li>your parents are worried about your weight loss, even if you don’t think it’s a problem</li></ul><p>It is especially important to see a doctor if you feel pain in your body, especially chest or stomach pain.</p><h2>At SickKids<br></h2><p>SickKids has an eating disorder program that treats children and teens who are struggling with symptoms of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. For more information on our program visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/eating-disorders-program.html">www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/eating-disorders-program</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em> <a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><h2>References</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>
Anorexie : présentation généraleAAnorexie : présentation généraleAnorexia nervosa: OverviewFrenchPsychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00ZHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>L’anorexie est un grave trouble de santé mentale qui a des conséquences à la fois physiques et psychologiques. Apprends à connaître les symptômes, les facteurs de risque et les options de traitement.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que l’anorexie?</h2><p>L’anorexie est un problème de santé mentale qui se manifeste lorsqu’une personne est si insatisfaite de son poids ou s’inquiète tellement de prendre du poids qu’elle suit des régimes amaigrissants, fait de l’exercice ou utilise d’autres méthodes dangereuses et malsaines pour perdre du poids.</p><p>Le manque d’aliments peut être à l’origine de beaucoup de problèmes de fonctionnement pour le corps. Les personnes atteintes d’anorexie peuvent aussi souffrir d’anxiété et de dépression. Mais grâce à un traitement, on peut inverser les effets physiques et psychologiques causés par le manque de nutrition.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>L’anorexie est un trouble du comportement alimentaire et de santé mentale caractérisé par une perception déformée de son image corporelle et une sous-alimentation qui contribue à maintenir un poids insuffisant et malsain.</li><li>C’est une affection très grave qui affiche un des taux de mortalité les plus élevés de tous les problèmes de santé mentale.</li><li>Le déclenchement de l’anorexie peut être associé à un ensemble de facteurs sociaux et d’événements stressants de la vie alliés à la génétique.</li><li>L’anorexie frappe le plus souvent les adolescents de 14 à 18 ans, mais peut aussi se manifester chez les jeunes enfants et, à l’occasion, chez les personnes âgées.</li><li>Souvent, les personnes anorexiques n’ont pas l’impression qu’elles ont un problème, même si leur santé en souffre.</li></ul><h2>Quels sont les symptômes de l’anorexie?</h2><p>Les personnes aux prises avec l’anorexie ont peur de grossir et pensent souvent qu’elles sont trop grosses, même après avoir perdu du poids ou après avoir entendu d’autres gens leur dire qu’elles n’ont pas besoin de perdre du poids.</p><p>Une personne anorexique n’aura pas toujours envie de parler de ce qu’elle ressent. Toutefois, l’anorexie présente certains symptômes usuels reconnaissables.</p><h3>Signes physiques de l’anorexie</h3><p>Principaux signes physiques :</p><ul><li>ne pas grandir à un rythme normal pour un adolescent</li><li>perdre du poids ou arrêter de prendre du poids</li><li>avoir froid tout le temps</li><li>étourdissement</li><li>manque d’énergie</li><li>constipation régulière</li><li>règles irrégulières ou absentes</li><li>pilosité ou perte de cheveux accrues</li><li>changements potentiellement dangereux dans le rythme cardiaque susceptibles d’entraîner la mort</li></ul><h3>Signes comportementaux et émotionnels de l’anorexie</h3><p>Principaux signes comportementaux et émotionnels :</p><ul><li>nier la perte de poids ou ne pas admettre qu’elle pose problème</li><li>refuser de manger avec d’autres personnes</li><li>ne vouloir manger que certains types d’aliments ou éliminer complètement certains groupes alimentaires</li><li>porter un intérêt accru à la nourriture – visiter des sites Web sur la nourriture ou faire la cuisine pour les autres – mais pas pour soi et ne pas toujours vouloir manger les mets préparés</li><li>porter des vêtements amples</li><li>sautes d’humeur, irritabilité accrue, tristesse et anxiété<br></li></ul><h2>L’anorexie est-elle très répandue?</h2><p>Environ une à deux filles ou femmes sur 100 sera atteinte d’anorexie. La recherche démontre que cette affection touche aussi les garçons, mais les statistiques exactes ne sont pas bien connues.</p><h2>Quelles sont les causes de l’anorexie?</h2><p>L’anorexie débute souvent entre 14 et 18 ans, mais elle peut apparaître chez des enfants plus jeunes et, parfois, chez des gens plus âgés. Les causes exactes de l’anorexie sont inconnues, mais son déclenchement est souvent associé à un ensemble de facteurs génétiques, psychologiques et sociaux et d’événements stressants de la vie.</p><h3>Génétique</h3><p>Le fait d’avoir un membre de la parenté chez qui un trouble alimentaire a été diagnostiqué peut être un facteur de risque dans le déclenchement de l’anorexie. Lorsque l’anorexie est présente, il est aussi fréquent de trouver des antécédents familiaux de troubles anxieux.</p><h3>Événements stressants de la vie</h3><p>L’anorexie peut être déclenchée à la suite d’un événement stressant ou <a href="/Article?contentid=3781&language=French">traumatisant</a>. La personne peut sentir qu’elle a perdu le contrôle et se tourner vers son alimentation comme une chose qu’elle peut contrôler.</p><h3>Facteurs psychologiques</h3><p>Certaines données indiquent que les personnes qui ont une personnalité obsessionnelle (qui mettent beaucoup l’accent sur les détails) ou perfectionniste sont à risque de souffrir d’anorexie. Les personnes qui ont de la difficulté à identifier leurs émotions peuvent également être à risque.</p><h3>Facteurs sociaux</h3><p>Les facteurs sociaux de l’anorexie comprennent la pression exercée par les pairs pour s’intégrer, le recours régulier aux régimes amaigrissants et l’importance accordée dans les médias à la minceur. Participer à des activités sportives qui accentuent l’importance de la minceur comme la gymnastique ou le ballet peuvent aussi favoriser le déclenchement de l’anorexie.</p><h2>Comment diagnostique-t-on l’anorexie?</h2><p>Il n’y a pas de test médical précis pour diagnostiquer un trouble alimentaire comme l’anorexie. Le médecin te posera habituellement des questions sur tes habitudes alimentaires et ton image corporelle (comment tu perçois ton corps) et pourra vérifier ton poids, ta tension artérielle et ta fréquence cardiaque. Il peut aussi demander des analyses de sang pour vérifier tes niveaux de sodium ou de potassium et constater s’il y a des risques de complications dues à un trouble alimentaire comme des étourdissements, de la faiblesse ou de la fatigue. Il est probable qu’il te fera aussi subir un électrocardiogramme (ECG) pour vérifier comment ton cœur fonctionne.</p><h2>Quand consulter un médecin?</h2><p>Souvent, les personnes souffrant d’anorexie n’ont pas l’impression d’avoir un problème et ne verront pas un médecin jusqu’à ce que la situation ne devienne très grave.</p><p>Il est important de consulter un médecin dans les cas suivants :</p><ul><li>tu remarques que tu commences à avoir peur de manger ou de grossir</li><li>tes parents s’inquiètent au sujet de ta perte de poids, même si tu ne penses pas qu’il y a un problème</li></ul><p>Il est particulièrement important de voir un médecin si tu ressens des douleurs dans le corps, en particulier à la poitrine ou au ventre.</p><h2>À l’hôpital SickKids</h2><p>L’hôpital SickKids offre un programme de traitement pour les enfants et les adolescents souffrant de troubles alimentaires comme l’anorexie, la boulimie et le trouble d’alimentation sélective et/ou d’évitement. Pour plus de renseignements sur ce programme, visite la page : <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/programs/eating%20disorders%20program/eating-disorders-program.html">http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/programs/eating-disorders-program.html</a>.</p><h2>Ressources</h2><p>(Disponibles uniquement en anglais)</p><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em><a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><h2>Références</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.<br></p>

 

 

 

 

Anorexia nervosa: Overview3785.00000000000Anorexia nervosa: OverviewAnorexia nervosa: OverviewAEnglishPsychiatry;AdolescentTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00Z10.300000000000052.2000000000000858.000000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental health disorder that has both physical and psychological consequences. Learn about the signs and symptoms, risk factors and treatment for AN.</p><h2>What is anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a mental health condition where a person feels so unhappy with their weight or is so worried about gaining weight that they diet, exercise or use other weight loss methods in a dangerously unhealthy way.</p><p>The body can develop many problems when it does not get enough food. People with anorexia nervosa can also develop anxiety and depression. But, with treatment, both the physical and psychological effects of starvation can be reversed.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder and mental health condition that involves having a distorted body image and under-eating to maintain an unhealthy low body weight.</li><li>It is a very serious condition and has one of the highest death rates of all mental health conditions.</li><li>Anorexia nervosa arises from a mix of genetics, stressful life events and psychological and social factors.</li><li>Anorexia nervosa often starts in teens aged 14 to 18 years, but can happen in younger children and occasionally in older people.</li><li>Often people struggling with an eating disorder do not feel that there is a problem, even though their health is affected.</li></ul><h2>What are the signs and symptoms of anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>People struggling with AN fear becoming fat and often think they are too big even after losing weight or hearing from other people that they don’t need to lose weight. </p><p>When someone has AN they may not want to share how they are feeling. However, AN has some standard recognizable signs and symptoms. </p><div class="symptoms-container" id="symp-anorexia"> <a href="#" class="symp-fullscreen"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/A_Landing_screen_mobile.png" alt="" /></a> <a href="#" class="symp-close-full material-icons pull-right">close</a> <div class="instruction-container"><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL</span></div><div class="thumbnail-col"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL</span></div><div class="anim-instructions"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/SpeechBubbles_Anorexia.png" alt="" /> </div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">BEHAVIOURAL </span> <button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Avoiding family meals</span> <p>When someone has anorexia, they often skip meals and make excuses to avoid eating with others, especially their family. They may say they have already eaten or arrange other activities during mealtimes.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia1_avoidingMeals.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Limiting food choices</span> <p>Someone with anorexia may pay very close attention to the food they eat. They might eat only low-calorie food, cut out food groups and have trouble being flexible.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia2_limitingFoodChoices.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Wearing baggy clothes</span> <p>A person with anorexia may wear baggy clothes, or many layers of clothing, to hide their weight loss from family and friends.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia5_baggyClothes.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Irritability</span> <p>Because their brains lack nutrients, someone with anorexia might not think clearly. They may become irritable, have mood swings and obsessive thoughts or be rigid about how to do things.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia6_irritability.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Wanting to cook but not eat meals</span> <p>Someone with anorexia may spend more time collecting and trying new recipes but rarely eating what they prepare. Or they may become more particular about which groceries they want.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia9_cookNotEat.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button></div></div><div class="symptoms-info"> <span class="symp-title">PHYSICAL </span> <button type="button" class="symp-close"><i aria-hidden="true" class="material-icons">home</i></button> <div class="info-card"><div class="desc"> <span class="card-title">Weight loss or failing to gain weight </span> <p>Teens should grow and gain weight as they get older. When they stop growing, they should maintain their weight within a healthy range. Anorexia can cause these changes to slow down, stop or even reverse.</p></div> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia4_weightLossORnoGain.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Feeling cold all the time</span> <p>When someone has anorexia they have reduced blood flow around the body. As a result, they may feel cold when most people feel comfortable and may wear warmer clothes than expected for the weather.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia3_feelingColdAlways.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Low energy and dizziness</span> <p>Because of their lower calorie intake, someone with anorexia usually lacks nutrition and may not drink enough fluids. They have very little energy and may feel tired or sluggish and feel faint.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia8_lowEnergyDizzy.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="info-card"> <span class="card-title">Unusual hair loss and growth </span> <p>A person with anorexia may notice unusual hair loss, for instance while washing their hair. However, in an effort to keep warm, they might also grow more body hair.</p> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Signs%20and%20Symptoms/Anorexia/Anorexia7_hairLoss.png?RenditionID=10" alt="" /> </div><div class="btn-container"> <button type="button" class="symp-prev"><i class="material-icons">chevron_left</i></button><button type="button" class="symp-next"><i class="material-icons">chevron_right</i></button></div></div><h3 class="main-title">ANOREXIA <span class="symp-subtitle">Common Signs</span></h3></div><h3>Physical signs of anorexia nervosa</h3><p>Physical signs include:</p><ul><li>not growing in a way that teens are expected to</li><li>losing weight or failing to gain weight</li><li>feeling cold all the time</li><li>feeling dizzy</li><li>lacking energy</li><li>regular constipation</li><li>irregular or missed periods </li><li>more body hair and/or loss of head hair </li><li>potentially dangerous changes in heart rate that could lead to death</li></ul><h3>Behavioural and emotional signs of anorexia nervosa</h3><p>Behavioural and emotional signs include:</p><ul><li>denying weight loss or not feeling that it’s a problem</li><li>not wanting to eat with others</li><li>wanting to eat only certain types of food or cutting out whole food groups</li><li>becoming more interested in food – going online to sites that focus on food or cooking for others – but not always wanting to eat the food</li><li>wearing baggy clothing</li><li>experiencing mood swings, including increased irritability, sadness and anxiety</li></ul><h2>How common is anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>About one to two in 100 females will develop AN. Research shows that it affects boys as well, but the exact number of males who have it is not well known.</p><h2>What causes anorexia nervosa?</h2><p>AN often starts from age 14 to 18 years, but it can happen in younger children and occasionally in older people. The exact causes of AN are unknown, but they often involve a mixture of genetics, stressful life events and psychological and social factors.</p><h3>Genetics</h3><p>It is very common for someone who develops AN to have other family members who have struggled with the same condition or with anxiety disorders.</p><h3>Stressful life events</h3><p>A person may develop AN after experiencing stress or a <a href="/Article?contentid=3781&language=English">trauma</a>. The stress or trauma may cause them to feel out of control, so they may turn to their eating pattern as something they can control instead. </p><h3>Psychological factors</h3><p>There is some evidence to suggest that people who are obsessive (focus a lot on details) or perfectionistic are at risk of developing AN. People who have a hard time naming their emotions can also be at risk.</p><h3>Social factors</h3><p>Some common social factors of AN include peer pressure to fit in, regular dieting and engagement with media that focus on thin bodies. Taking part in sports that have a focus on a certain body type, such as gymnastics or ballet, may be also increase the risk of developing AN. </p><h2>How is anorexia nervosa diagnosed?</h2><p>There is no specific medical test to diagnose an eating disorder such as AN. Instead, a doctor will arrive at a diagnosis after asking you questions and examining you. The doctor will usually ask about your eating and body image (how you feel about your body) and will check your weight, blood pressure and heart rate. They may also order blood tests to check your levels of sodium or potassium to see if you are at risk of any complications of an eating disorder, such as dizziness, weakness or fatigue. They will also often order an ECG, a test that looks at how your heart is working.</p><h2>When to see a doctor about anorexia nervosa</h2><p>People with AN often don’t feel there is a problem, so they may not go to the doctor until things are very serious. </p><p>It’s important to see a doctor if: </p><ul><li>you notice that you’re starting to fear eating or weight gain</li><li>your parents are worried about your weight loss, even if you don’t think it’s a problem</li></ul><p>It is especially important to see a doctor if you feel pain in your body, especially chest or stomach pain.</p><h2>At SickKids<br></h2><p>SickKids has an eating disorder program that treats children and teens who are struggling with symptoms of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. For more information on our program visit: <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/eating-disorders-program.html">www.sickkids.ca/adolescentmedicine/eating-disorders-program</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em> <a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)</p><h2>References</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>