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TraumaTTraumaTraumaEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00Z10.300000000000048.30000000000001118.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>What is a traumatic event?</h2><p>A traumatic event is a frightening, dangerous or extremely stressful experience in which you are exposed to, or threatened with, death, injury, or violence. You might experience a trauma directly or see someone else being injured or threatened.</p><p>Many different experiences can be traumatic. These include:</p><ul><li>physical abuse or assault</li><li>sexual abuse or assault (including trafficking)</li><li>psychological abuse or neglect (for instance not being properly cared for by adults or being repeatedly humiliated, harshly criticized, or intimidated) </li><li>witnessing violence at home or in the community</li><li>bullying</li><li>a serious car or other accident </li><li>a natural disaster </li><li>terrorism</li><li>a serious medical illness or procedure</li><li>sudden and/or violent loss of a loved one</li><li>refugee and war experiences</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p><a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/SCAN/index.html">Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) Program at SickKids</a></p><p><a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/psychiatry/outpatient-program/index.html">SickKids Child and Youth Psychiatry Outpatient Program</a></p><p><a href="https://www.sickkidscmh.ca/">SickKids Centre for Community Mental Health</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p>Anxiety Canada - <em><a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/parenting/post-traumatic-stress-disorder">Post Traumatic Stress Disorder</a></em></p><p> <a href="https://www.protectchildren.ca/en/">Canadian Centre for Child Protection</a></p><p>Caring for Kids New to Canada - <em><a href="https://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/mental-health/ptsd">Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder</a></em></p><p> <a href="http://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/">Here to Help</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">Kids Help Phone</a> </p><p>Ontario Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services - <em><a href="http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/childrensaid/reportingabuse/index.aspx">Reporting abuse and neglect</a></em></p><p> <a href="https://www.nctsn.org/">The National Child Traumatic Stress Network</a></p><p>Toronto Police Service – <a href="https://yourchoice.to/">Resources for survivors of sexual assault</a></p><p>World Health Organization - <em><a href="https://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/violence-against-children/en/">Violence and Injury Prevention</a></em></p><p>American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VS: Author.</p><p>Choi, K. R., Seng, J. S., Briggs, E. C., Munro-Kramer, M. L., Graham-Bermann, S. A., Lee, R., & Ford, J. D. (2018). Dissociation and ptsd: What parents should know. Los Angeles, CA, and Durham, NC: National Center for Child Traumatic Stress.</p><p>McLaughlin, K. A., Koenen, K. C., Hill, E. D., Petukhova, M., Sampson, N. A., Zaslavsky, A. M., & Kessler, R. C. (2013). Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder in a national sample of adolescents. <em>Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry</em>, 52(8), 815-830.</p>
Les événements traumatisantsLLes événements traumatisantsTraumaFrenchPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Qu’est-ce qu’un événement traumatisant? </h2><p>Un événement traumatisant est une expérience terrifiante, dangereuse ou extrêmement stressante au cours de laquelle tu as été exposé ou été menacé de mort, de blessure ou de violence. On peut vivre un événement traumatisant soi-même ou être traumatisé de voir une autre personne subir des blessures ou des menaces.</p><p>Beaucoup d’expériences peuvent être traumatisantes, notamment :</p><ul><li>la violence ou une agression physique</li><li>la violence ou une agression sexuelle (y compris le trafic sexuel)</li><li>la violence ou la négligence psychologique (par ex., ne pas recevoir de soins adéquats par des adultes ou être constamment humilié, critiqué durement ou intimidé)</li><li>être témoin de violence à la maison ou dans la communauté</li><li>l’intimidation</li><li>un grave accident de voiture ou autre accident</li><li>une catastrophe naturelle</li><li>le terrorisme</li><li>une maladie grave ou une procédure médicale sérieuse</li><li>la perte soudaine ou violente d’un être cher</li><li>la guerre ou le statut de réfugié</li></ul><h2>À l'hôpital SickKids</h2><p>Les pages suivantes sont disponibles uniquement en anglais.</p><p> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/SCAN/index.html">Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) Program at SickKids</a></p><p> <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/psychiatry/outpatient-program/index.html">SickKids Child and Youth Psychiatry Outpatient Program</a><br></p><p> <a href="https://www.sickkidscmh.ca/">SickKids Centre for Community Mental Health</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p>Anxiety Canada - <em> <a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/parenting/post-traumatic-stress-disorder">Post Traumatic Stress Disorder</a></em> (en anglais)</p><p> <a href="https://www.protectchildren.ca/fr/">Le Centre canadien de protection de l'enfance</a></p><p>Les soins aux enfants néo-canadiens - <em> <a href="https://www.enfantsneocanadiens.ca/mental-health/ptsd">Le syndrome de stress post-traumatique</a></em></p><p> <a href="http://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/">Here to Help</a> (en anglais)</p><p> <a href="https://jeunessejecoute.ca/?_ga=2.41606242.1181783796.1560966068-1918250431.1560966068">Jeunesse, J'écoute</a> </p><p>Ministère des Services à l'enfance et des Services sociaux et communautaires - <em> <a href="http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/French/childrensaid/reportingabuse/index.aspx">Signalement des cas de négligence et de mauvais traitements à l'égard d'un enfant</a></em></p><p> <a href="https://www.nctsn.org/">The National Child Traumatic Stress Network</a> (en anglais)</p><p>Toronto Police Service – <a href="https://yourchoice.to/guides/french.pdf">Guide à l’intention des survivants d’agressions sexuelles</a></p><p>Organisation mondiale de la Santé - <em> <a href="https://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/fr/">Prévention de la violence</a></em></p><p>American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VS: Author.</p><p>Choi, K. R., Seng, J. S., Briggs, E. C., Munro-Kramer, M. L., Graham-Bermann, S. A., Lee, R., & Ford, J. D. (2018). Dissociation and ptsd: What parents should know. Los Angeles, CA, and Durham, NC: National Center for Child Traumatic Stress.</p><p>McLaughlin, K. A., Koenen, K. C., Hill, E. D., Petukhova, M., Sampson, N. A., Zaslavsky, A. M., & Kessler, R. C. (2013). Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder in a national sample of adolescents. <em>Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry</em>, 52(8), 815-830.</p>

 

 

 

 

Trauma3781.00000000000TraumaTraumaTEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-22T04:00:00Z10.300000000000048.30000000000001118.00000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>What is a traumatic event?</h2><p>A traumatic event is a frightening, dangerous or extremely stressful experience in which you are exposed to, or threatened with, death, injury, or violence. You might experience a trauma directly or see someone else being injured or threatened.</p><p>Many different experiences can be traumatic. These include:</p><ul><li>physical abuse or assault</li><li>sexual abuse or assault (including trafficking)</li><li>psychological abuse or neglect (for instance not being properly cared for by adults or being repeatedly humiliated, harshly criticized, or intimidated) </li><li>witnessing violence at home or in the community</li><li>bullying</li><li>a serious car or other accident </li><li>a natural disaster </li><li>terrorism</li><li>a serious medical illness or procedure</li><li>sudden and/or violent loss of a loved one</li><li>refugee and war experiences</li></ul><h2>Signs and symptoms</h2><p>It’s normal to have some temporary, negative reactions after a traumatic experience. But sometimes a traumatic event can have longer-lasting effects that interfere with daily life, including your ability to do your regular activities, go to school and spend time with your friends and family.</p><h3>Potential reactions to trauma</h3><p>There are many possible reactions to trauma. These include:</p><ul><li>being unable to stop thinking about what happened or trying not to think about what happened</li><li>difficulty sleeping</li><li>nightmares</li><li>uncomfortable physical sensations (such as a racing heartbeat, a knot in stomach, dry mouth, dizziness)</li><li>anxiety</li><li>sadness, anger or worry</li><li>difficulty concentrating (for example, unable to pay attention to school work)</li><li>tiredness or low energy</li><li>loss of interest in things you used to enjoy</li><li>thoughts of self-harm or suicide</li><li>substance use issues</li><li>guilt about parts of the traumatic event</li><li>difficulty trusting others or forming close relationships</li></ul><h2>How common are traumatic experiences?</h2><p>More than half of teenagers (62 per cent) have experienced a potentially traumatic event. About 5 per cent of youth develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is more common in girls than boys.</p><h3>Are some people more likely to experience negative effects from trauma than others? </h3><p>The negative impacts from traumatic experiences can be greater and/or longer-lasting if someone:</p><ul><li>has experienced trauma in early childhood</li><li>has experienced multiple traumatic events</li><li>uses substances to help them cope</li><li>isolates themselves from others </li><li>does not seek help for their symptoms</li></ul><h2>Is there a diagnosis if someone has negative reactions to trauma?</h2><p>Most people will feel scared or shaken up after a traumatic experience; this is entirely natural.</p><p>See a health-care professional, such as a doctor, psychologist, social worker or therapist, if your reactions to a trauma: </p><ul><li>are lasting longer than a few days</li><li>are reducing your ability to go to school or interact with friends or family</li></ul><p>To diagnose a condition, a doctor who specializes in mental health, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist, will talk to you and/or your parent about your symptoms and concerns, any current stressors at home or at school and the events or situations that have triggered your reactions. Sometimes people who are exposed to trauma can be diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression.</p><h2>When should I see a health-care professional? </h2><p>See your primary care provider if you feel worried about your body or your physical health after experiencing a trauma.</p><p>See a social worker or a mental health professional such as a psychologist or a therapist if you have difficulty coping with your reactions to a trauma. </p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p><a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/SCAN/index.html">Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) Program at SickKids</a></p><p><a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/psychiatry/outpatient-program/index.html">SickKids Child and Youth Psychiatry Outpatient Program</a></p><p><a href="https://www.sickkidscmh.ca/">SickKids Centre for Community Mental Health</a></p><h2>Resources</h2><p>Anxiety Canada - <em><a href="https://www.anxietycanada.com/parenting/post-traumatic-stress-disorder">Post Traumatic Stress Disorder</a></em></p><p> <a href="https://www.protectchildren.ca/en/">Canadian Centre for Child Protection</a></p><p>Caring for Kids New to Canada - <em><a href="https://www.kidsnewtocanada.ca/mental-health/ptsd">Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder</a></em></p><p> <a href="http://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/">Here to Help</a></p><p> <a href="https://kidshelpphone.ca/">Kids Help Phone</a> </p><p>Ontario Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services - <em><a href="http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/childrensaid/reportingabuse/index.aspx">Reporting abuse and neglect</a></em></p><p> <a href="https://www.nctsn.org/">The National Child Traumatic Stress Network</a></p><p>Toronto Police Service – <a href="https://yourchoice.to/">Resources for survivors of sexual assault</a></p><p>World Health Organization - <em><a href="https://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/violence-against-children/en/">Violence and Injury Prevention</a></em></p><p>American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VS: Author.</p><p>Choi, K. R., Seng, J. S., Briggs, E. C., Munro-Kramer, M. L., Graham-Bermann, S. A., Lee, R., & Ford, J. D. (2018). Dissociation and ptsd: What parents should know. Los Angeles, CA, and Durham, NC: National Center for Child Traumatic Stress.</p><p>McLaughlin, K. A., Koenen, K. C., Hill, E. D., Petukhova, M., Sampson, N. A., Zaslavsky, A. M., & Kessler, R. C. (2013). Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder in a national sample of adolescents. <em>Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry</em>, 52(8), 815-830.</p>