AboutKidsHealth for Teens

 

 

School and chemotherapySSchool and chemotherapySchool and chemotherapyEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNADrug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z61.000000000000068.0000000000000286.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>When you are first diagnosed with cancer, you may miss a lot of school. A teacher who works in the hospital will come see you (unless you’re feeling too sick) and help you keep up with your studies. Eventually, you will be going home – and back to your regular school. This might make you nervous. </p>
L'école et la chimiothérapieLL'école et la chimiothérapieSchool and chemotherapyFrenchOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNADrug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Après avoir reçu un diagnostic de cancer, tu pourrais t’absenter de l'école pendant une longue période. Un enseignant qui travaille à l'hôpital t'aidera à te tenir à jour dans tes études (à moins que tu sois trop malade). Tu finiras par rentrer chez toi et retourner à ton école habituelle. Cela pourrait te rendre nerveux.</p>

 

 

 

 

School and chemotherapy3465.00000000000School and chemotherapySchool and chemotherapySEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNADrug treatmentPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z61.000000000000068.0000000000000286.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>When you are first diagnosed with cancer, you may miss a lot of school. A teacher who works in the hospital will come see you (unless you’re feeling too sick) and help you keep up with your studies. Eventually, you will be going home – and back to your regular school. This might make you nervous. </p><p>You may be worried about how others will react to your change in appearance. It is hard to hide some side effects of cancer medications, so being honest about what happened may take away some the pressure of trying to keep it a secret. But that doesn’t mean you have to tell your school mates everything. Do what makes you comfortable. Check out the section on <a href="/Article?contentid=3502&language=English">communication</a> for more information. </p><p>The biggest risk you face when going to school while receiving treatment is infection. It’s important that you wash your hands well at school, especially before touching your face or eating. Stay away from friends who are sick if you can.</p><div class="caution"><h3>Important</h3><p>If you hear of a chickenpox infection or other outbreak in your school, always tell your health-care team.</p></div><p>Sometimes, you may have to take time off school while you get your chemotherapy treatments. Telling your teacher what is happening will help make school more accommodating for you. You can plan ahead for when you know you will have to leave and ask the teacher what will be taught those days. Maybe the teacher can give you the readings and assignments a few days early so that you can work on them at home or even at the clinic. Your health-care team is a great resource to help you co-ordinate with school on how to get all your work done.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/School_and_chemotherapy.jpg