AboutKidsHealth for Teens

 

 

CT scan and cancerCCT scan and cancerCT scan and cancerEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.1000000000000073.4000000000000451.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>CT stands for computed tomography. CT scans take a series of X-ray pictures as the scanner moves down your body. Then a computer puts all the X-ray pictures together and the doctors can see different representing "slices" through your body.</p><p>A CT scan can take a picture of any body part. The pictures are clearer than regular X-rays and it is easier to see all the different little parts inside the body. </p><p>CT scans are used often and are considered safe. Some people worry about radiation from the X-ray camera in a CT scan. If you or your family have questions or are concerned about radiation, talk to your doctor or nurse.</p>
Le tomodensitogrammeLLe tomodensitogrammeCT scanFrenchOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les tomodensitogrammes sont des tomographies informatisées. Ces appareils prennent de nombreuses radiographies différentes à mesure que le tomodensitomètre se déplace sur ton corps. Un ordinateur place alors toutes les radiographies ensemble et les médecins peuvent voir différentes « coupes » de ton corps. </p><p>Un tomodensitomètre peut prendre un cliché de n'importe quelle partie du corps. Les clichés sont plus nets que les radiographies habituelles et il est plus facile de voir les différentes petites parties à l'intérieur du corps.</p><p>Les tomodensitogrammes sont utilisés souvent et ils sont sécuritaires. Certaines personnes sont inquiètes de la radiation émise par l'appareil de radiographie du tomodensitogramme. Si ta famille ou toi avez des questions ou si vous êtes préoccupés par la radiation, n'hésite pas à parler à ton médecin ou à un infirmier.</p>

 

 

 

 

CT scan and cancer3444.00000000000CT scan and cancerCT scan and cancerCEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.1000000000000073.4000000000000451.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>CT stands for computed tomography. CT scans take a series of X-ray pictures as the scanner moves down your body. Then a computer puts all the X-ray pictures together and the doctors can see different representing "slices" through your body.</p><p>A CT scan can take a picture of any body part. The pictures are clearer than regular X-rays and it is easier to see all the different little parts inside the body. </p><p>CT scans are used often and are considered safe. Some people worry about radiation from the X-ray camera in a CT scan. If you or your family have questions or are concerned about radiation, talk to your doctor or nurse.</p><figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/BT_Neuro_CT_small_MEDIMG-PHO_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <h2>How are CT scans done?</h2><p>The CT scan machine looks like a giant donut. You will lie on a narrow bed that slides into the centre of the donut. You will hear some noise as the camera moves around inside the donut to take X-ray pictures from many different angles.</p><p>A technologist will show you what to do during your CT scan. You will probably need to change into a hospital gown and you will need to take off any metal you are wearing because it can cause problems with the picture.</p><p>During the scan, you will need to stay completely still. The technologist will leave the room, but you will still be able to hear and talk to them over an intercom.</p><p>If you are worried about being inside the machine or that you will not be able to stay still, talk to your doctor before the day of the scan. They can give you suggestions to help you through it or may be able to give you some medicine that will help you relax.</p><p>Usually, a CT scan takes about 30 minutes. The scan itself is usually pretty quick, but it can take a while to prepare the machine and help you get into the right position.</p><h2>Contrast</h2><p>Sometimes you will need to drink or have an injection with a special dye called contrast that makes the CT scan pictures clearer. Some people say they feel warm or taste bananas or a metallic taste when the dye is in their body, but this sensation goes away.</p><h2>CT scan results</h2><p>A specialist doctor called a radiologist will look at the pictures from the CT scan and will then talk to your doctor. Your doctor will tell you and your family what the pictures showed. It can sometimes take up to a week for the results to be ready.</p>