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Scans and cancer diagnosisSScans and cancer diagnosisScans and cancer diagnosisEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z6.6000000000000075.6000000000000267.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Scans can help your health-care team diagnose cancer, decide what type of treatment is best and see how the cancer is reacting to treatment. Learn about the different types of scans and why you may need one.</p><h2>What are scans?</h2><p>Scans take pictures of the inside of your body to let your health-care team see if there is something wrong. Types of scans you might need to help your health-care team diagnose cancer include:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3443&language=English">X-rays</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3445&language=English">ultrasounds</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3446&language=English">MRIs</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3444&language=English">CT scans</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3447&language=English">PET scans</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3448&language=English">bone scans</a></li></ul><p>Each of these scans take pictures of the inside of your body using different methods. Different types of scans are able to get pictures of different body parts and some show different detail.</p><p>Scans don’t hurt but they can be loud and it can be hard or uncomfortable to lay still. Sometimes, you may need to have an IV (intravenous) as part of the scan. An IV is a thin, flexible, plastic tube that stays in your vein for up to a few days, usually in your arm or hand. The IV can be connected to a bigger tube through which you can be given special medications called dyes (to make certain body parts show up better on a scan) or fluids.</p><p>Scans are done by a radiologist, a doctor who is an expert in tests that produce pictures of the inside of the body. A technologist (a person who is trained to use the machines that take the scans) will help the radiologist to do the scans. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Scans take pictures of the inside of your body. X-rays, ultrasounds, MRIs, CT scans, PET scans and bone scans are all types of scans.</li><li>Each scan uses a different method to take the picture and can get pictures of different body parts.</li><li>Scans don't hurt but they can be loud and sometimes staying still can cause discomfort.</li><li>Scans help your health-care team diagnose cancer and decide on the right treatment.</li></ul>
Les examens de tomodensitométrieLLes examens de tomodensitométrieScansFrenchOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2018-09-22T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Faits éclairs sur les examens de tomodensitométrie</h2><ul><li>Les radiographies, les échographies, les IRM, les tomodensitogrammes, les TEP et les scintigraphies osseuses font tous partie d'un type d'examens appelé des examens de tomodensitométrie.</li><li>Ces examens photographient l'intérieur de ton corps.</li><li>Chacun utilise une façon différente d'obtenir le cliché et peut obtenir des clichés de différentes parties du corps.</li><li>Les examens de tomodensitométrie sont indolores. Ils peuvent toutefois être bruyants, et il est parfois difficile ou inconfortable de ne pas bouger. Certains examens exigent une injection intraveineuse (IV). Ceci est un tube intraveineux en plastique mince et souple qui demeure dans ta veine pendant quelques jours, habituellement dans ton bras ou dans ta main. Ce peut être raccordé à un tube plus grand par lequel il est possible d'injecter des médicaments spéciaux appelés des colorants (certaines parties du corps sont ainsi plus visibles à l'examen) ou des liquides.</li><li>Les examens de tomodensitométrie sont effectués par un radiologiste, un médecin qui se spécialise dans les examens qui photographient l'intérieur du corps. Un technologue (une personne ayant suivi la formation pour utiliser les appareils servant à l'examen) aidera le radiologiste à effectuer les examens.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Scans and cancer diagnosis3442.00000000000Scans and cancer diagnosisScans and cancer diagnosisSEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z6.6000000000000075.6000000000000267.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Scans can help your health-care team diagnose cancer, decide what type of treatment is best and see how the cancer is reacting to treatment. Learn about the different types of scans and why you may need one.</p><h2>What are scans?</h2><p>Scans take pictures of the inside of your body to let your health-care team see if there is something wrong. Types of scans you might need to help your health-care team diagnose cancer include:</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3443&language=English">X-rays</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3445&language=English">ultrasounds</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3446&language=English">MRIs</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3444&language=English">CT scans</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3447&language=English">PET scans</a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=3448&language=English">bone scans</a></li></ul><p>Each of these scans take pictures of the inside of your body using different methods. Different types of scans are able to get pictures of different body parts and some show different detail.</p><p>Scans don’t hurt but they can be loud and it can be hard or uncomfortable to lay still. Sometimes, you may need to have an IV (intravenous) as part of the scan. An IV is a thin, flexible, plastic tube that stays in your vein for up to a few days, usually in your arm or hand. The IV can be connected to a bigger tube through which you can be given special medications called dyes (to make certain body parts show up better on a scan) or fluids.</p><p>Scans are done by a radiologist, a doctor who is an expert in tests that produce pictures of the inside of the body. A technologist (a person who is trained to use the machines that take the scans) will help the radiologist to do the scans. </p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Scans take pictures of the inside of your body. X-rays, ultrasounds, MRIs, CT scans, PET scans and bone scans are all types of scans.</li><li>Each scan uses a different method to take the picture and can get pictures of different body parts.</li><li>Scans don't hurt but they can be loud and sometimes staying still can cause discomfort.</li><li>Scans help your health-care team diagnose cancer and decide on the right treatment.</li></ul><h2>Why do I need a scan?</h2><p>Scans are useful because they can help your doctors diagnose your cancer and decide on the right treatment. Scans can show:</p><ul><li>the location and size of a tumour</li><li>the stage of your cancer (whether it has spread) </li><li>where your cancer has spread</li></ul><p>You will continue to have scans after diagnosis. Scans can help your health-care team to see how well your treatment is working.</p><div class="callout2"><p>Remember, your best source of information about scans is your health-care team.</p></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Scans_and_cancer.jpg