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Biopsies and cancerBBiopsies and cancerBiopsies and cancerEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.3000000000000070.3000000000000596.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Fast facts about biopsies</h2><ul><li>In a biopsy (say: BY-op-see), the doctor will take a small sample of tissue from what they think might be a tumour.</li><li>A specialized doctor called a pathologist looks at the cells in the tissue sample under a microscope to see if they are cancerous.</li><li>A biopsy is a very good way to diagnose exactly what type of cancer you have. It can also tell the doctor whether your treatment is working well.</li><li>There are two main types of biopsies – closed biopsies and open biopsies. </li></ul>
Les biopsies et le cancerLLes biopsies et le cancerBiopsies and cancerFrenchOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2018-09-22T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Faits éclairs sur les biopsies</h2><ul><li>Au cours d'une biopsie (se prononce BY-op-si), le médecin prélève un petit échantillon de tissu à l'endroit où il pense trouver la tumeur.</li><li>Le médecin regarde les cellules provenant de l'échantillon à l'aide d'un microscope pour découvrir si elles sont cancéreuses.</li><li>Une biopsie est une très bonne façon d'obtenir le diagnostic exact de ton type de cancer. Elle indique également au médecin si ton traitement est efficace.</li><li>Il existe deux principaux types de biopsie : les biopsies fermées et les biopsies ouvertes.<br></li></ul><p>Ton médecin choisira le type de biopsie en fonction de l'emplacement de la tumeur et du type de cancer dont tu souffres.</p>

 

 

 

 

Biopsies and cancer3440.00000000000Biopsies and cancerBiopsies and cancerBEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodyNATestsPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.3000000000000070.3000000000000596.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Fast facts about biopsies</h2><ul><li>In a biopsy (say: BY-op-see), the doctor will take a small sample of tissue from what they think might be a tumour.</li><li>A specialized doctor called a pathologist looks at the cells in the tissue sample under a microscope to see if they are cancerous.</li><li>A biopsy is a very good way to diagnose exactly what type of cancer you have. It can also tell the doctor whether your treatment is working well.</li><li>There are two main types of biopsies – closed biopsies and open biopsies. </li></ul><h2>Why do I need a biopsy?</h2><p>For the majority of cancers, a biopsy is the most important part of diagnosis. A biopsy is often the only way the doctors can look at the actual cells in a tumour. By looking at the cells, they can tell what type of cancer you have. Knowing what type of cancer you have is the most important part of planning your treatment.</p><h2>What is a closed biopsy?</h2><p>In a closed biopsy, the doctor or surgeon puts a needle into the tumour to get a sample. It is called a closed biopsy because the doctor does not have to cut the skin open. </p><p>You may first be given a local anaesthetic, which will reduce or take away the pain at the site of the procedure. Then the doctor will put a needle through your skin and into the tumour. If the tumour is deep inside you, a scan can help the doctor get a picture of the inside of your body. This will help them see where to put the needle. The doctor will use the needle to take out a sample of the tumour cells. Doctors called pathologists, who specialize in looking at biopsies, will then look at the cells under a microscope in a lab.</p><h2>What is an open biopsy?</h2><p>In an open biopsy, the doctor will need to make a cut in your skin to get a sample of the cells in your tumour. An open biopsy is a type of surgery that is usually done by a surgeon. </p><p>Unless the tumour is on the outside of your body (for example on your skin), you will almost always need a general anaesthetic for an open biopsy. Once the anaesthetic is working and you are completely asleep, the surgeon will cut through the skin to get to the tumour to take a small sample. Sometimes, if it is possible, they may even remove the whole tumour. The surgeon will use sutures (stitches) to close up the cuts that were made during surgery. A pathologist will look at the cells in the tumour sample under a microscope in a lab.</p><h2>Biopsies and risk</h2><p>Having a biopsy has some risks such as bleeding and infection. Your doctor will talk to you about the risks and benefits of having a biopsy. Be sure to ask questions if there is anything you do not understand.</p><h2>After a biopsy</h2><p>You might feel pain in the place where the biopsy was taken and you might have a bruise. You can take medicine to help with the pain.</p><p>You will have to wait a number of days for the results of the biopsy, sometimes up to a few weeks.</p><div class="callout2"><p>Remember, your best source of information about biopsies is your health-care team. </p></div>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Biopsies_and_cancer.jpg