AboutKidsHealth for Teens

 

 

Germ cell tumoursGGerm cell tumoursGerm cell tumoursEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)Testicle;OvariesReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z6.8000000000000074.3000000000000550.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Germ cell tumours are a cancer that starts in the germ cells of the body. The word "germ" in germ cell comes from the word "germinate", which means to give life. It does not mean germ like the kind that makes you sick.</p><p>Germ cells are the cells in our bodies that play a part in human reproduction. A germ cell tumour starts with a mutation in one of these cells. The mutation causes the cell to divide out of control. As the cells divide again and again, a tumour forms.</p><p>In teens, germ cell tumours are most commonly found in the:</p><ul><li>testicles (in boys), where they form a painless lump</li><li>ovaries (in girls), where they form a lump in the abdomen (belly) that can be painful and make it hard to go to the bathroom.</li></ul><p>Although germ cells are part of reproduction, they can also be found in the abdomen, chest and brain. This is because in the months before we are born, germ cells move around our tiny growing body to the parts that will later develop into our sex organs. Some of these cells do not make it all the way to their destination and tumours can form where these cells are left.</p>
Tumeurs germinalesTTumeurs germinalesGerm cell tumoursFrenchOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)Testicle;OvariesReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2018-09-22T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Les tumeurs germinales sont un cancer qui commence dans les cellules germinales de l’organisme. « Germinale » provient du mot « germer », qui signifie donner la vie. Il n’y a donc pas de lien avec les germes à l’origine de maladies.</p><p>Les cellules germinales sont les cellules de notre corps qui jouent un rôle dans la reproduction humaine. Une tumeur germinale commence par la mutation d’une de ces cellules. La mutation en provoque la division incontrôlée. La cellule se divise continuellement, au point de former une tumeur.</p><p>Chez les adolescents, les tumeurs des cellules germinales se trouvent généralement :</p><ul><li>dans les testicules (chez les garçons), où ils forment une masse sans douleur;</li><li>dans les ovaires (chez les filles), où ils forment une bosse dans le ventre qui peut être douloureuse et occasionner des problèmes au moment d’aller aux toilettes.</li></ul><p>Quoique les cellules germinales servent à la reproduction, elles peuvent également se trouver dans l’abdomen (le ventre), au milieu de la poitrine et dans le cerveau. La raison est que, plusieurs mois avant notre naissance, les cellules germinales se déplacent dans notre minuscule corps vers les parties destinées à devenir les organes sexuels. Les tumeurs peuvent donc se développer à partir de celles qui ne se sont pas rendues à destination.</p>

 

 

 

 

Germ cell tumours3429.00000000000Germ cell tumoursGerm cell tumoursGEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)Testicle;OvariesReproductive systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z6.8000000000000074.3000000000000550.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Germ cell tumours are a cancer that starts in the germ cells of the body. The word "germ" in germ cell comes from the word "germinate", which means to give life. It does not mean germ like the kind that makes you sick.</p><p>Germ cells are the cells in our bodies that play a part in human reproduction. A germ cell tumour starts with a mutation in one of these cells. The mutation causes the cell to divide out of control. As the cells divide again and again, a tumour forms.</p><p>In teens, germ cell tumours are most commonly found in the:</p><ul><li>testicles (in boys), where they form a painless lump</li><li>ovaries (in girls), where they form a lump in the abdomen (belly) that can be painful and make it hard to go to the bathroom.</li></ul><p>Although germ cells are part of reproduction, they can also be found in the abdomen, chest and brain. This is because in the months before we are born, germ cells move around our tiny growing body to the parts that will later develop into our sex organs. Some of these cells do not make it all the way to their destination and tumours can form where these cells are left.</p><h2>How are germ cell tumours diagnosed?</h2><p>Doctors learn what type of germ cell tumour you have through a process called diagnosis.</p><p>Usually diagnosis of a germ cell tumour starts with a doctor examining you and asking you a lot of questions about how you are feeling and why you came to the clinic or the hospital. The doctor will then do <a href="/Article?contentid=3438&language=English">blood tests</a> and a <a href="/Article?contentid=3440&language=English">biopsy</a> to get a sample of the cells in the tumour. The doctor will look at this sample under a microscope to check for cancerous cells. They will also do some <a href="/Article?contentid=3442&language=English">scans</a> to get a picture of the inside of your body. This can help the doctor see how big the tumour is and if the cancer has spread.</p><h2>How are germ cell tumours treated?</h2><p>Doctors use the information they gather to plan your treatment. Your treatment will depend on: </p><ul><li>where the cancer is located</li><li>the type of germ cell involved</li><li>the stage of the cancer (whether it has spread)</li></ul><p>Usually treatment for germ cell tumours includes <a href="/Article?contentid=3477&language=English">surgery</a> to remove the tumour and often <a href="/Article?contentid=3458&language=English">chemotherapy</a> to kill cancer cells still in the body. </p><h2>Prognosis for germ cell tumours</h2><p>Your doctor will probably talk to you and your family about a prognosis. A prognosis means the likelihood or chance that treatment will work and that you will get better from cancer. Like your treatment, your prognosis will depend on where the tumour is located and whether it has spread.</p><p>The best source of information about your cancer is your health-care team. If you have any questions or there is anything you do not understand about your cancer, ask your doctors and nurses. They want to help you understand your cancer.</p><p>If you are nervous about asking the doctors or nurses yourself, you can talk to your parents/caregiver. They may be able to answer your questions or can help you ask questions when talking to the health-care team. </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Germ_cell_tumours_teen.jpg