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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)AAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)EnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000066.5000000000000430.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia, a cancer of the blood, in teenagers and younger children. We can get some information about this type of cancer from the different parts of its name.</p><ul><li> <strong>Acute</strong> means quick or short. ALL usually develops quickly and can get worse quickly if it is not treated.</li><li> <strong>Lymphoblastic</strong> comes from the name of the cell that ALL comes from. Remember that leukemia starts with a mutation or change in the DNA of the immature blood cell. In ALL, this mutation is in the cell that would normally mature into a specific white blood cell called the lymphocyte (say: lim-foe-sites). The new, mutated cell is called a lymphoblast or leukemic blast. </li><li>In leukemia, the lymphoblasts do not mature and so they cannot do the job of the white blood cell, which is to fight infection. The mutation causes them to divide out of control and so the lymphoblasts fill up the bone marrow and stop the bone marrow from making healthy blood cells.</li></ul><div class="asset-animation"> <iframe src="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/AKH/animations/DevelopmentOfALL_Teen/Development_ALL_teen_canvas_AMD_EN.html"></iframe>  </div>
La leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA)LLa leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA)Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)FrenchOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2018-09-22T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>La leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA), un cancer du sang, est le type de leucémie le plus commun chez les adolescents et les jeunes enfants. Le nom de ce type de cancer en révèle quelques caractéristiques.</p><ul><li> <strong>Aiguë</strong> signifie rapide ou court. La LLA se développe habituellement rapidement et peut vite s’aggraver en l’absence de traitement.</li><li> <strong>Lymphoblastique</strong> provient du nom de la cellule touchée par la LLA. Souviens-toi que la leucémie commence par une mutation ou une modification de l’ADN d’un globule immature. Relativement à la LLA, cette mutation a lieu dans la cellule qui doit normalement devenir un globule blanc spécifique appelé lymphocyte. La nouvelle cellule mutée est appelée lymphoblaste. </li><li>En cas de leucémie, les lymphoblastes n’atteignent pas la maturité et sont donc incapables d’accomplir la fonction des globules blancs, soit la lutte aux infections. La mutation provoque leur division incontrôlée. Les lymphoblastes remplissent donc la moelle osseuse et l’empêchent de fabriquer des cellules sanguines saines.</li></ul>

 

 

 

 

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)3421.00000000000Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)AEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.7000000000000066.5000000000000430.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia, a cancer of the blood, in teenagers and younger children. We can get some information about this type of cancer from the different parts of its name.</p><ul><li> <strong>Acute</strong> means quick or short. ALL usually develops quickly and can get worse quickly if it is not treated.</li><li> <strong>Lymphoblastic</strong> comes from the name of the cell that ALL comes from. Remember that leukemia starts with a mutation or change in the DNA of the immature blood cell. In ALL, this mutation is in the cell that would normally mature into a specific white blood cell called the lymphocyte (say: lim-foe-sites). The new, mutated cell is called a lymphoblast or leukemic blast. </li><li>In leukemia, the lymphoblasts do not mature and so they cannot do the job of the white blood cell, which is to fight infection. The mutation causes them to divide out of control and so the lymphoblasts fill up the bone marrow and stop the bone marrow from making healthy blood cells.</li></ul><div class="asset-animation"> <iframe src="https://teens.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/AKH/animations/DevelopmentOfALL_Teen/Development_ALL_teen_canvas_AMD_EN.html"></iframe>  </div><h2>Types of ALL</h2><p>Normally, healthy lymphocytes help fight infection in our body. There are two types of lymphocytes, B-cells (B-lymphocytes) and T-cells (T-lymphocytes). ALL can develop in either of these cells.</p><ul><li>B-cell ALL is caused when DNA changes occur in young lymphoblasts that would normally mature into B-lymphocytes. This is the most common type of ALL.</li><li>T-cell is when DNA changes occur in young lymphoblasts that would normally mature into T-lymphocytes.</li></ul><p>Knowing which type of ALL you have helps the doctor plan your treatment.</p><h2>Symptoms of ALL</h2><p>Symptoms are signals from the body that something is wrong. When you have ALL, symptoms might include:</p><ul><li>fever, because your body does not have enough white blood cells to fight infection or because of the leukemia itself</li><li>feeling tired, weak and not hungry</li><li>feeling like you can’t catch your breath when you exercise, because you do not have enough red blood cells to carry oxygen to your body when you need it</li><li>looking pale, because you do not have enough red blood cells</li><li>bruising or bleeding easily, because you do not have enough platelets to make a scab</li><li>swollen lymph nodes, liver or spleen - these are parts of your lymphatic system, where leukemia cells can grow and divide</li><li>bone pain</li></ul><p>If you have any questions about your type of ALL, what it means, your treatment or anything else about your cancer, ask someone on your health-care team. Your doctors and nurses want to help you understand.</p>