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LeukemiaLLeukemiaLeukemiaEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.0000000000000069.0000000000000947.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Fast facts about leukemia</h2><ul><li>Leukemia is a cancer of the blood </li><li>There are different types of leukemia. The most common types are acute lymphoblastic (say: lim-foe-BLAS-tik) leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid (say: my-uh-loyd) leukemia (AML).</li><li>ALL and AML get their names from the types of blood cells where the cancer begins.</li></ul><p>To better understand leukemia, you need to first understand a bit about blood, what it does and how it is made.</p>
La leucémieLLa leucémieLeukemiaFrenchOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2018-09-22T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Faits saillants sur la leucémie</h2> <ul> <li>La leucémie est un cancer du sang.<br></li> <li>Il existe différents types de leucémies. Les types les plus courants sont la leucémie lymphoblastique aiguë (LLA) et la leucémie aiguë myéloblastique (LAM).</li> <li>La LLA et la LAM doivent leur nom aux types de cellules sanguines où elles apparaissent.</li> </ul> <p>Afin de mieux comprendre la leucémie, tu dois d’abord comprendre un peu le sang, ce qu’il accomplit et ce dont il est composé.</p>

 

 

 

 

Leukemia3420.00000000000LeukemiaLeukemiaLEnglishOncologyPre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-15 years);Late Teen (16-18 years)BodySkeletal systemConditions and diseasesPre-teen (9-12 years) Teen (13-15 years) Late Teen (16-18 years)NA2019-09-03T04:00:00Z7.0000000000000069.0000000000000947.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Fast facts about leukemia</h2><ul><li>Leukemia is a cancer of the blood </li><li>There are different types of leukemia. The most common types are acute lymphoblastic (say: lim-foe-BLAS-tik) leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid (say: my-uh-loyd) leukemia (AML).</li><li>ALL and AML get their names from the types of blood cells where the cancer begins.</li></ul><p>To better understand leukemia, you need to first understand a bit about blood, what it does and how it is made.</p><h2>Blood</h2><ul><li>Blood is pumped around your body by your heart and travels around in vessels called arteries and veins. Arteries carry blood from your heart to the tissues in your body. Veins carry blood from your tissues back to your heart.</li><li>Your heart, blood and blood vessels form the circulatory (say: sir-koo-LATE-or-ee) system.</li><li>Blood is made of different kinds of cells that float in liquid called plasma.</li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Components of blood</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Blood_components_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Blood is made up of red blood cells, platelets, and different kinds of white blood cells. These cells are all suspended in liquid plasma.</figcaption></figure> <h2>Blood cells</h2><p>There are three main types of blood cells.</p><ul><li>Red blood cells make up half of the blood cells in normal blood. These cells carry oxygen from the lungs.</li><li>Platelets are small cells that stop your body from bleeding when you get hurt.</li><li>White blood cells are part of your immune system and work to keep your body healthy by fighting diseases or infections from things like bacteria or viruses. There are a few types of white blood cells, each with different jobs.</li></ul><p>Blood cells have a short life span. Your body needs to constantly make new ones to replace blood cells that are old and worn out.</p><h2>Haematopoiesis (making new blood cells)</h2><p>Your body makes new blood cells through a process called haematopoiesis (say: hee-mah-tuh-poe-EE-sis). </p><p>Haematopoiesis happens in our bone marrow. The bone marrow is a spongy material found on the insides of the big bones in our body. You can think of bone marrow as a blood cell factory. All the different types of blood cells are made there. Healthy bone marrow makes millions of blood cells every day. This is why <a href="/Article?contentid=3441&language=English">bone marrow tests </a> are used to find out if you have leukemia.</p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Bone marrow</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Bone_marrow_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The bigger bones of the body, like the pelvis, contain bone marrow. The bone marrow produces blood cells.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>White blood cells</h2><p>White blood cells help fight infection. There are two main types of white blood cells. </p><ul><li>Lyphoid (say: lim-foyd) cells mature or specialize into a kind of white blood cell called a lymphocyte (say: lim-foe-site).</li><li>Myeloid (say: my-uh-loyd) cells mature or specialize into certain types of cells, including neutrophils. </li></ul> <figure class="asset-c-80"><span class="asset-image-title">Blood cell development</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Blood_cell_development_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">All blood cells develop from one type of 'parent' cell called a stem cell. Stem cells are found in the bone marrow.</figcaption> </figure> <p>When the blood cells have specialized to form mature blood cells, they are let out of the bone marrow and into the blood to circulate around the body.</p><h2>What is leukemia</h2><p>Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells in the bone marrow. In leukemia, there is a mutation in the DNA of an immature blood cell, called a stem cell. Because of the mutation, the blood cell divides out of control to make many more immature blood cells called blasts. As more and more leukemic blasts are formed, they fill up the bone marrow and start leaking out into the bloodstream. Having so many leukemic blasts in the bone marrow means it’s hard to make healthy blood cells. So, most of the time people with leukemia have low numbers of all normal blood cells – low normal white cells, low platelets and low red blood cells. </p> <figure class="asset-c-80"> <span class="asset-image-title">Common changes in whole blood count for leukemia</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Complete_blood_count_leukemia_IMD_EN_72.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">There are many types of cells in the blood. Cancers such as leukemia can change the number of each cell type.</figcaption></figure> <p>Here are some differences between people with healthy bone marrow and people with leukemia:</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>People with healthy bone marrow</th><th>People with leukemia</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Have enough red blood cells to carry oxygen to all the cells in their body</td><td>Do not have not enough red blood cells to carry oxygen; they look pale and feel tired and short of breath. This is called anemia (say: a-nee-mee-yah).</td></tr><tr><td>Have enough platelets to stop bleeding when injured</td><td>Do not have enough platelets; they bleed or bruise very easily. This is called thrombocytopenia (say: throm-bo-site-o-pee-nee-yah).</td></tr><tr><td>Have enough white blood cells to fight infection</td><td>Do not have enough white blood cells; they get infections very easily. This is called neutropenia (say: noo-tro-pee-nee-yah).</td></tr></tbody></table><p>There are a number of different types of leukemia, but the most common types are <a href="/Article?contentid=3421&language=English">acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=3422&language=English">acute myeloid leukemia (AML)</a>. To learn more about these types of leukemia check out these sections.<br></p><h2>How is leukemia diagnosed?</h2><p>Doctors learn what type of leukemia you have through a process called diagnosis. </p><p>Usually, diagnosis of leukemia starts with a doctor doing a <a href="/Article?contentid=3438&language=English">blood test </a> called a complete blood count to check the number of blood cells in your blood, and see if there are too many or too few. Then the doctor will also do a <a href="/Article?contentid=3441&language=English">bone marrow aspiration</a> where they take a sample of your bone marrow. They will also do a <a href="/Article?contentid=3439&language=English">lumbar puncture</a> to see if any leukemic blasts are in your cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the fluid around your brain and your spine. </p><h2>How is leukemia treated?</h2><p>Doctors use the information they gather to diagnose what type of leukemia you have and plan your treatment. The main type of treatment for leukemia is <a href="/Article?contentid=3458&language=English">chemotherapy</a>. Rarely, other treatments such as <a href="/Article?contentid=3471&language=English">radiation</a> are required. The goal of treatment is to kill all of the leukemic blasts in your body. You will learn more about different types of treatment in the sections on cancer medications and cancer treatments and support therapies.</p><h2>Prognosis for leukemia</h2><p>Your best source of information about your leukemia is your health-care team. If you have any questions or there is anything you do not understand about your leukemia, ask your doctors and nurses. If you are nervous about asking the doctors or nurses by yourself, talk to your parent/caregiver. They may be able to answer your questions or they can help you ask questions. </p>