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Your boyfriend or girlfriendYYour boyfriend or girlfriendYour boyfriend or girlfriend after scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Sylvia Swan, MSW, RSW;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000075.0000000000000293.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn some tips for communicating and coping with your boyfriend or girlfriend's reaction to the news that you need to have scoliosis surgery.</p><p>Boyfriends or girlfriends might not react the way you expect them to when they hear that you need surgery. They might take the challenge of helping you through surgery head on. On the other hand, your surgery might be too much for them to handle. Here is what a couple of teens experienced with their boyfriends when they had surgery.</p>
Ton petit copain ou ta petite copineTTon petit copain ou ta petite copineYour boyfriend or girlfriend after scoliosis surgeryFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Sylvia Swan, MSW, RSW;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000075.0000000000000293.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Voici des conseils pour communiquer avec ton copain ou ta copine et gérer sa réaction à la nouvelle que tu dois te faire opérer pour la scoliose.</p><p>Les petits amis peuvent ne pas réagir de la manière que tu attendrais d’eux quand tu leur annonceras que tu dois te faire opérer. Ils pourraient affronter le défi de t’aider tout au long de l’opération, comme l’opération pourrait être trop pour eux. Voici ce que quelques adolescentes ont vécu avec leur copain quand elles ont dû se faire opérer.</p>

 

 

Your boyfriend or girlfriend2811.00000000000Your boyfriend or girlfriendYour boyfriend or girlfriend after scoliosis surgeryYEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Sylvia Swan, MSW, RSW;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC6.0000000000000075.0000000000000293.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Learn some tips for communicating and coping with your boyfriend or girlfriend's reaction to the news that you need to have scoliosis surgery.</p><p>Boyfriends or girlfriends might not react the way you expect them to when they hear that you need surgery. They might take the challenge of helping you through surgery head on. On the other hand, your surgery might be too much for them to handle. Here is what a couple of teens experienced with their boyfriends when they had surgery.</p><p> <em>"When I went in for surgery, I had a boyfriend at that time. And I was just wondering, is he going to really stick around? We eventually never really did work out because he wasn’t for the whole surgery thing. So after going through surgery and knowing that he wasn’t going to be there, that really hurt. But it’s always good to know. You think you know someone until something like that happens."</em></p><p> <em>"The boyfriend I had when I was going through the surgery, I didn’t think he was going to be there for me because we were only going out for a few months. I was kind of hesitant about him coming to the hospital to see me all drugged up and everything. But then I realized that he was there every day. He was my moral support basically."</em></p><h2>Communicating and coping with your boyfriend or girlfriend</h2><p>There is no way for you to know how someone will react to the news that you need surgery and there is no way you can control their response. Here are a few tips for coping with your boyfriend or girlfriend: </p><ul><li>Provide them with information about scoliosis and what surgery will involve.</li><li>Be open, honest, and clear about your expectations and needs before and after surgery.</li><li>Accept that some people might be better supports than others during your recovery.</li></ul>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_boyfriend_or_girlfriend.jpg