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Employment and career optionsEEmployment and career optionsEmployment and career optionsEnglishTransplant;NephrologyTeen (13-18 years)KidneysRenal system/Urinary systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Employment and career options2778.00000000000Employment and career optionsEmployment and career optionsEEnglishTransplant;NephrologyTeen (13-18 years)KidneysRenal system/Urinary systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<figure> <img alt="Older teen working as mechanic" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/TTC_Trans2_S11_6_PBR.jpg" /> </figure> <p>Before you had your transplant, you might have been so sick that you couldn’t imagine having a job. You might have thought that your family would have to support you forever or that you would qualify for disability payments. Most people with a transplant can work, so it is important to find a job that you can enjoy. Your transplant team can tell you if there are any jobs or careers you should avoid because of the type of transplant you received.<br></p><h2>What to consider when thinking about a job or career</h2><p>When you are thinking about a job or career, consider whether you want a job where you can be active or if you would rather sit at a desk. Also consider if you would like to interact with colleagues or clients or prefer to work on your own. It is also worth considering if you would prefer an office or outdoor job. </p><p>Put all these answers together and then start asking teachers, your guidance counsellor and family members what kinds of jobs may be a good fit. You can also go online to assess your strengths and interests and identify suitable careers. This is something you can start in grade 9 or 10 well before you are ready to graduate from high school.</p><h2>Finding out what job is right for you</h2><p>A school co-op is another great way to check out something you think you are interested in. If this option isn’t available, consider contacting an organization or company to see if you could “job shadow” someone. This usually involves a safety orientation to begin with and then observing or helping someone at their job for anything from a few hours to a week. It gives you a real idea of what a job is like.</p><p>Many people get their first real job after volunteering at an organization. Volunteer experience is often a way to meet people in the working world and get some experience.</p><h2>Job searching resources<br></h2><p>Here are some local centres that can help you with job searching:</p><ul><li> <a href="http://www.firstwork.org/" target="_blank">First Work</a></li><li> <a href="http://www.tdsb.on.ca/AdultLearners/EmploymentServices/NextStepsEmploymentCentres.aspx" target="_blank">Next-Steps Employment Centres</a></li><li> <a href="https://ymcagta.org/employment-and-immigrant-services" target="_blank">YMCA of Greater Toronto</a></li><li> <a href="http://www.woodgreen.org/" target="_blank">Woodgreen Youth Job Centre</a></li></ul><p>If you have a specific disability, there may be separate organizations in your community that can address your needs and help you to find a job. Here are some examples.</p><ul><li> <a href="http://epilepsytoronto.org/about-us/programs-and-services/employment/" target="_blank">Epilepsy Toronto Employment Services</a></li><li> <a href="http://www.balancefba.org/" target="_blank">Balance for Blind Adults</a> </li><li> <a href="http://www.chs.ca/employment-services" target="_blank">Canadian Hearing Society</a></li><li> <a href="http://www.aln.ca/placement.php" target="_blank">Ability Learning Network</a></li></ul><p>If you want more information on different websites that might help you in the Greater Toronto Area, visit the <a href="http://www.sickkids.ca/good2go/" target="_blank">Good 2 Go website.</a></p><br>