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Liver transplant from a deceased donorLLiver transplant from a deceased donorLiver transplant from a deceased donorEnglishTransplant;GastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)LiverDigestive systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z

 

 

Liver transplant from a deceased donor2648.00000000000Liver transplant from a deceased donorLiver transplant from a deceased donorLEnglishTransplant;GastrointestinalTeen (13-18 years)LiverDigestive systemProcedures;Conditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2017-11-30T05:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<figure> <img alt="Two people casting a shadow while they walk" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/TTC_Trans2_S3_4_PBR.jpg" /></figure> <h2>Checking the safety of the deceased donor organ</h2><p>Specialists in organ donation review the health and lifestyle of all potential donors and decide if there is anything that could cause infection or poor liver function. </p><p>Your transplant team will have the results of all the important tests before the organ is transplanted.<br></p><h2>Co-ordinating the transplant</h2><p>Liver transplants take place, ideally, within 10 hours of the liver being removed from the donor.</p><p>Once your transplant team calls to tell you that an organ is available, you need to get to the hospital as soon as possible.</p><h2>Keeping the donor’s identity confidential</h2><p>You will not know the name of the deceased donor or anything about them. In the same way, the donor family will not know anything about you, your name or your disease. The donor and their family have the right to privacy and confidentiality and so do you. It is important to respect this right. It is also the law.</p>