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Binge eating disorder (BED): Treatment and long-term outcomesBBinge eating disorder (BED): Treatment and long-term outcomesBinge eating disorder (BED): Treatment and long-term outcomesEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00Z7.6000000000000065.6000000000000489.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>How is binge eating disorder treated?</h2><p><a href="/Article?contentid=3791&language=English">Binge eating disorder (BED)</a> is treated with therapy, the most common method being cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). CBT involves working with a therapist and learning to eat regularly, identify what might trigger binges and manage your emotions. Sometimes the therapy will also involve your family, as they can help you regulate your eating and offer support. It can be really hard to receive treatment on your own.</p><p>The main goals of treatment for BED are to:</p><ul><li>reduce the binges</li><li>address the emotions that occur with or just before a binge</li><li>help you eat regularly </li><li>help you feel more in control of your eating</li></ul><p>No medication is regularly prescribed for BED. If you have other mental health issues, such as depression or anxiety, your doctor may suggest medication to treat those.</p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em> <a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)<br></p><h2>References</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>
L’hyperphagie boulimique : traitement et résultats à long termeLL’hyperphagie boulimique : traitement et résultats à long termeBinge eating disorder (BED): Treatment and long-term outcomesFrenchPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00ZFlat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>Comment traite-t-on l’hyperphagie boulimique?</h2><p>L’<a href="/Article?contentid=3791&language=French">hyperphagie boulimique</a> est traitée au moyen de thérapies, la plus courante étant la thérapie cognitivo-comportementale (TCC), où le patient consulte un thérapeute pour apprendre à manger de façon régulière, à cerner les facteurs qui peuvent provoquer une hyperphagie et à gérer ses émotions. Parfois tes proches participeront aussi à la thérapie pour t’aider à régulariser ton alimentation et te fournir un soutien. Suivre un traitement tout seul peut être très difficile.</p><p>Le traitement de l’hyperphagie boulimique vise surtout à :</p><ul><li>réduire les épisodes d’hyperphagie</li><li>aborder les émotions qui se manifestent juste avant ou pendant un épisode d’hyperphagie</li><li>t’aider à manger de façon régulière</li><li>t’aider à maîtriser tes habitudes alimentaires</li></ul><p>Aucun médicament n’est prescrit régulièrement contre l’hyperphagie boulimique. Si tu as d’autres problèmes de santé mentale comme la dépression ou l’anxiété, ton médecin peut te suggérer des médicaments.</p><h2>Ressources</h2><p>(Disponibles uniquement en anglais)</p><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)<br></p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em><a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)<br></p><h2>Références</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>

 

 

 

 

Binge eating disorder (BED): Treatment and long-term outcomes3792.00000000000Binge eating disorder (BED): Treatment and long-term outcomesBinge eating disorder (BED): Treatment and long-term outcomesBEnglishPsychiatryTeen (13-18 years)NANAConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2019-03-25T04:00:00Z7.6000000000000065.6000000000000489.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<h2>How is binge eating disorder treated?</h2><p><a href="/Article?contentid=3791&language=English">Binge eating disorder (BED)</a> is treated with therapy, the most common method being cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). CBT involves working with a therapist and learning to eat regularly, identify what might trigger binges and manage your emotions. Sometimes the therapy will also involve your family, as they can help you regulate your eating and offer support. It can be really hard to receive treatment on your own.</p><p>The main goals of treatment for BED are to:</p><ul><li>reduce the binges</li><li>address the emotions that occur with or just before a binge</li><li>help you eat regularly </li><li>help you feel more in control of your eating</li></ul><p>No medication is regularly prescribed for BED. If you have other mental health issues, such as depression or anxiety, your doctor may suggest medication to treat those.</p><h2>How to help yourself as you receive treatment for BED</h2><h3>Talk to others</h3><p>It can be really difficult to share your worries about your eating or concerns about your body, but talking to a trusted adult is the first step in helping yourself.</p><h3>Gradually change your eating patterns</h3><p>There is no short-cut to recovery from an eating disorder. The best way to decrease bingeing is to eat regularly. Creating a schedule of three meals and snacks will help to make sure your body is getting the nutrition it needs. Don’t skip meals; we know this can make the urges to binge stronger later in the day. If you do binge, try to get back on track with your eating as soon as you can rather than skip later meals. </p><p>Eating a <a href="/Article?contentid=3773&language=English">variety of food</a> is also important. People tend to binge on foods that they’re generally trying not to eat, such as cookies or cake. But having these foods in moderation as part of a balanced nutrition plan will help make bingeing less likely.</p><h3>Have a regular sleep schedule</h3><p>It’s also important to get enough <a href="/Article?contentid=3632&language=English">sleep</a>. When we are tired, our bodies can get confused and sometimes make us feel like we need to eat more the next day to stay awake and have energy.</p><h3>Get treatment for any other mental health conditions</h3><p>If you’ve been experiencing depression or anxiety, it’s important to get treatment for those conditions. This too can help decrease bingeing.</p><h2>Is there any way to prevent binge eating?</h2><p>The best way to prevent binge eating is to make sure you are eating a variety of foods regularly. Remember that binge eating is most often linked with dieting in the past.</p><h2>What can I expect in the future?</h2><p>Treatment for BED will usually involve therapy once or twice a week in the beginning. Over time, therapy sessions may spread out. Your therapist may suggest you see your family doctor for a medical check few times during the therapy.<br></p><h2>Resources</h2><p> <a href="http://www.nedic.ca/">NEDIC – National Eating Disorder Information Centre</a> (Canada)</p><p> <a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/">NEDA – National Eating Disorder Association</a> (United States)</p><p>American Academy of Pediatrics – <em> <a href="https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/emotional-problems/Pages/Is-Your-Teen-at-Risk-for-Developing-an-Eating-Disorder.aspx">Eating Disorders in Children</a> </em></p><p> <a href="https://www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk/">B-EAT – Beating Eating Disorders</a> (United Kingdom)</p><p> <a href="https://keltyeatingdisorders.ca/">Kelty Eating Disorders</a> (Kelty Mental Health Resource Centre, BC Children's Hospital)<br></p><h2>References</h2><p>Practice Parameters for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2015;54(5):412–425.</p>