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Your emotions: In the hospitalYYour emotions: In the hospitalYour emotions: In the hospital after scoliosis surgeryEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Sylvia Swan, MSW, RSW;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC5.0000000000000081.0000000000000660.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Immediately following scoliosis surgery, you may feel irritable and frustrated. Read about why you may feel this way, and tips for dealing with it.</p><p>Here are some of the ways you may feel when you are in the hospital. The paragraphs in quotes are what some teens said about how they felt. </p>
Tes émotions : à l’hôpitalTTes émotions : à l’hôpitalYour emotions: In the hospital after scoliosis surgeryFrenchOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Sylvia Swan, MSW, RSW;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC5.0000000000000081.0000000000000660.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Immédiatement après une opération pour la scoliose, tu pourrais te sentir irritable et frustré. Voici pourquoi tu pourrais te sentir comme ça et de conseils pour gérer la situation.</p><p>Voici certaines émotions que tu pourrais éprouver quand tu seras à l’hôpital. Les paragraphes entre guillemets sont des citations d’adolescents sur leurs sentiments. </p>

 

 

Your emotions: In the hospital2808.00000000000Your emotions: In the hospitalYour emotions: In the hospital after scoliosis surgeryYEnglishOrthopaedics/MusculoskeletalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Vertebrae;SpineMuscular system;Skeletal systemConditions and diseasesTeen (13-18 years)NA2008-06-01T04:00:00ZSandra Donaldson, BA;Sylvia Swan, MSW, RSW;James G. Wright, MD, MPH, FRCSC5.0000000000000081.0000000000000660.000000000000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Immediately following scoliosis surgery, you may feel irritable and frustrated. Read about why you may feel this way, and tips for dealing with it.</p><p>Here are some of the ways you may feel when you are in the hospital. The paragraphs in quotes are what some teens said about how they felt. </p><h2>How will you feel in the hospital?</h2><p>You may feel disoriented. The hospital will have many different noises, smells, lighting, and routines.</p><p> <em>"I was trying to sleep and then I’d hear people’s footsteps and it bugged me."</em></p><p>You may feel confused. There will be many health care professionals coming in and out of your room at all hours of the day and night. Often these are nurses coming to check your status.</p><p> <em>"I wouldn’t answer the people when they came in to ask me questions. You’re like ‘what do you want?’ and you just want them to go away."</em></p><p>You may feel grouchy. The anaesthesia, which is the sleep medication you took during the surgery, and pain medication can make you feel irritable.</p><p> <em>"You’re grumpy or you’re really woozy. You’re just like, whatever, I don’t care."</em> </p><p>You may feel scared or embarrassed because the things you normally do for yourself will be difficult. These might include going to the bathroom, getting something to eat or drink, and changing your clothes. You will have to rely on others to help you.</p><p> <em>"The nurses were a huge help. They made me feel very comfortable even though I was really embarrassed because I couldn’t do anything for myself."</em></p><p>You may feel a sense of regret.</p><p> <em>"I was sitting in that hospital bed and was thinking, ‘Why did I do this?’ Like, from that perspective, you really don’t see the reasons why you did it."</em></p><h2>How to manage your feelings</h2><p>Try to visit the hospital before your surgery. You can visit the floor where you will be staying and meet some of the hospital staff ahead of time. The more you know about what’s going to happen, the less anxious you will feel.</p><p> <em>"I thought it was going to be way scarier. I didn’t know what the room was going to look like. I thought operating rooms were like you see on TV, like big rooms with one little bed. It wasn’t like that."</em></p><p>Bring some things from home to make you feel more comfortable in your new surroundings. These might include your pillow, a special blanket, ear plugs, a sleeping eye mask, or some scented hand cream.</p><p>It’s very normal to feel groggy and grouchy because of medication. Don’t worry, you aren’t going crazy. The nurses expect this and your family will too if you tell them ahead of time.</p><p>You will need help from the nurses to do things that you normally do yourself. Don’t feel embarrassed. Nurses are trained and very experienced in caring for patients following spine surgery. They will do everything they can to make you feel comfortable and maintain your privacy as much as possible. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.</p><p> <em>"The nurse who took care of me on the floor, we had a ‘friend’ kind of relationship. I had her there to help me. I’d even press the intercom to just talk with her, not because I needed to roll over or take medication, or get help to go to the bathroom."</em></p><p>If you want, your parents or best friend can help with some of your care.</p><p> <em>"When my friend had her surgery, I stayed overnight in the hospital with her for a couple of nights. I’d wake up at 2:00 am to get her ice chips or sponge her mouth, help her roll over, and help her stand and go for a walk."</em></p><p>It is important to understand that your time in the hospital and the first few months at home may be difficult. Things will improve with time. </p><p> <em>"The sense of regret of having the surgery went away with time. Once I started getting out more with friends, or even just walking, it helped to remind me that life isn’t over."</em></p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/your_emotions_in_the_hospital.jpg